Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
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Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

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Registered: 03-01-2013
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:34pm

We also get a lot of, "Our EFC is over six thousand dollars a year! Where are we going to get an extra six thousand dollars a year?" And I'm thinking...this kid is eighteen years old. You've known he was going to get to this age for eighteen years, unless something awful happened. EFC isn't the money you are supposed to have "extra." It's the money you were supposed to have saved over the last eighteen years. Twenty five thousand dollars is just a little over $115 a month since the kid was born, not counting any interest that might have accrued.

----------So you are assuming that everyone that wants to sent their kids to college are able to save every.single.month for 18 years? You do realize things happen, right? You do realize that people lose their jobs, right?, You do realize medical problems come up, right? You do realize that family problems come up, right? You do realize that life happens, right?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2013
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:35pm
No, they are going to look at your asset statements and tax returns for the last several years, and any outstanding "fixed" bills that you have, and how many kids you are trying to put through college at the same time, and they are going to come up with a number that says at such-and-such an income, your child qualifies for X amount of grant, X amount of guaranteed loan, and the family will be expected to contribute X amount. ------------Thanks for the info. This is for financial aid, correct?
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:41pm

rosenylund wrote:
<p>We also get a lot of, "Our EFC is over six thousand dollars a year! Where are we going to get an extra six thousand dollars a year?" And I'm thinking...this kid is eighteen years old. You've known he was going to get to this age for eighteen years, unless something awful happened. EFC isn't the money you are supposed to have "extra." It's the money you were supposed to have saved over the last eighteen years. Twenty five thousand dollars is just a little over $115 a month since the kid was born, not counting any interest that might have accrued.</p><p>----------So you are assuming that everyone that wants to sent their kids to college are able to save every.single.month for 18 years? You do realize things happen, right? You do realize that people lose their jobs, right?, You do realize medical problems come up, right? You do realize that family problems come up, right? You do realize that life happens, right?</p>

Sure life happens.  So in the good months, you put away MORE than the minimum, so that when bad times come, you can put in less and still be on track for meeting your financial goals.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:42pm

rosenylund wrote:
No, they are going to look at your asset statements and tax returns for the last several years, and any outstanding "fixed" bills that you have, and how many kids you are trying to put through college at the same time, and they are going to come up with a number that says at such-and-such an income, your child qualifies for X amount of grant, X amount of guaranteed loan, and the family will be expected to contribute X amount. ------------Thanks for the info. This is for financial aid, correct?

Yes.  This is for financial aid.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2013
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:44pm
Sure life happens. So in the good months, you put away MORE than the minimum, so that when bad times come, you can put in less and still be on track for meeting your financial goals. -------------Again, you are assuming how everyone's financial lives are without being there every single month when they do their bills.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2013
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:46pm
Yes. This is for financial aid. -----Ok, thanks. I know there are other ways to pay for college too so it is not always black and white.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:53pm

rosenylund wrote:
Sure life happens. So in the good months, you put away MORE than the minimum, so that when bad times come, you can put in less and still be on track for meeting your financial goals. -------------Again, you are assuming how everyone's financial lives are without being there every single month when they do their bills.

Yes, the FAFSA assumes your financial situation is pretty "typical."  You can appeal an EFC, and like I said, if you have some disaster or heavy health bills, or something like that, it can be lowered.  But nobody is going to lower an EFC based on appeal about heavy consumer spending.  It just doesn't work that way.  If you don't have any savings, you have to show where the money went.  Basically, when you ask for need-based financial aid, you are saying you COULD NOT possibily be expected to contribute.  If the issue is you don't WANT to, you'd rather spend the money elsewhere, it really isn't fair to ask other people to finance your child's education.  At least not in this country, where we don't provide no-charge higher education to all students who qualify for admission.

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:53pm
Rose: "Thanks for the info. This is for financial aid, correct?" Not only. It is also for student loans.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2013
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:56pm
Yes, the FAFSA assumes your financial situation is pretty "typical." You can appeal an EFC, and like I said, if you have some disaster or heavy health bills, or something like that, it can be lowered. But nobody is going to lower an EFC based on appeal about heavy consumer spending. It just doesn't work that way. If you don't have any savings, you have to show where the money went. Basically, when you ask for financial aid, you are saying you COULD NOT possibily be expected to contribute. If the issue is you don't WANT to, you'd rather spend the money elsewhere, it really isn't fair to ask other people to finance your child's education. At least not in this country, where we don't provide no-charge higher education to students who qualify. ---------------Gotcha thanks. I think people have many different resources for paying for college too. You are aware of grandparents college accounts too, right?
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:59pm

rosenylund wrote:
Yes, the FAFSA assumes your financial situation is pretty "typical." You can appeal an EFC, and like I said, if you have some disaster or heavy health bills, or something like that, it can be lowered. But nobody is going to lower an EFC based on appeal about heavy consumer spending. It just doesn't work that way. If you don't have any savings, you have to show where the money went. Basically, when you ask for financial aid, you are saying you COULD NOT possibily be expected to contribute. If the issue is you don't WANT to, you'd rather spend the money elsewhere, it really isn't fair to ask other people to finance your child's education. At least not in this country, where we don't provide no-charge higher education to students who qualify. ---------------Gotcha thanks. I think people have many different resources for paying for college too. You are aware of grandparents college accounts too, right?

I am aware there are any number of ways that people pay for college.  I do not understand why someone whose parents are paying for their childrens' education would be claiming they can't afford to pay for college.  Obviously in that case, the college would be paid for.

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