Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

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Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
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Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

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Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 2:48am
"Many moons ago, I graduated from law school almost $200K in debt. Never lost one night's sleep." A law degree is not an advanced degree in the humanities, it is a professional degree and a completely different animal. 200K in debt would still be a real bummer though if you failed to pass the bar or could only find a job in a small, provincial office somewhere writing will for farmers and shopkeepers.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 2:37am
"I thought you said you did things to ensure that daughters have the same opportunities as sons, That's a kind of helicoptering to me" Did it really not occur to you that she might have meant that she works politically, for example, to improve opportunities for women, and that on the personal level she means that she will pay for just as much college for a daughter as for a son, as one example.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 2:28am
Regina, yes to all that about Ph.D programs. Also, the student teaching you do as a "peachy D" candidate is part of your training, since you are supposed to go out and teach others when you are done.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 2:22am

Jam, I am always upfront with dd about possible roadblocks to her plans, but then we brainstorm solutions. We do not dwell on the roadblock aspect, we dwell on the solutions.

When she was 3, she wanted to be an evzone:

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I told her the only problem was that they do not take girls. But since her grandmother was from a warrior clan, in which the women also fought, the evzone guys were clearly mistaken about this male requirement, and I felt quite sure, I told her, that if it really mattered to her, she would be able to set them straight on that. She was quite happy with this idea and spent the next 6 months practicing marching with her gun, using a large stick as a gun and chanting the name of her grandmother's warrior clan.

Then she became a pacifist and forgot about the evzones. I meant it, however, if she had wanted to start a court case, for example, and go to the European court or whatever, I would have backed her. If she wanted to go meet with the defense minister about it, I would make sure dh made that happen and so on. 

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 2:11am
"This thread has produced a division b/w women who think we can have it all and those who don't believe there is such a thing," I really don't think that is the issue. Of course there are trade-offs in life. The trick is to know what "all" is to you. Apart from that gender inequality is a real thing and it is still a factor in the everyday lives of lots of women.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 2:06am
Dd was going to become a vet, then get a boat with a vet office onboard, and then she would go from island to island taking care of all the sick and mistreated animals. I discussed with her completely seriously how she would go about organizing fundraisers for such a project. Why not? It was a good idea.
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Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:05pm

nt

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Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:47pm

<I've said many times that we are prepared to help our kids through school, We don't touch but add to the investments we've had set up for them, And my points over the years have never changed.  I really don't know what your plans are, All I know is that your kids are older than mine, Isn't one in college by now? >

My oldest daughter is a hs senior. She has been accepted at 6 of 8 of her college choices (brag on) so far (Mar 28 decision for the 2 Ivys she applied). She has a full ride at two of her choices, and lots of merit aid at 2 others, . We're kind of screwed at need only based colleges, because we have saved lots for our kids.

So we could pay 0 - 60K per year for her college tuition.

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Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:34pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>Thanks for the research.  48% of Americans saving for college is pretty good.</p><p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">reginageorge2005</em> wrote:</div>  Moreover, who is stomping on a child's ambition? Aren't most graduate level students 22 or older? Ph.D candidates would be at least what--23 or 24? When did 23 year olds start being classified as children? I've had conversations with (undergrad) advisees in which I've pointed out that if they're failing and miserable in their major classes--they're going to be miserable working FT in that field. That's not crushing dreams, that's reality. &lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;You really don't see the difference in crushing a child's dreams by raising them to believe they can't and helping an adult figure out a reasonable life plan?&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;FWIW, my husband is good at what he does. If our kids want to go to med school at Harvard, we can swing it. But I recognize that we are certainly not normal in that regard.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>The point is, Don't tell children they can have it all if they can't.</p>

Again, since my kids can--where are you going with this? And again, you didn't answer my question: you're classifying 22-24 year olds as children now?

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

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Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:22pm

chestnuthooligan wrote:
<p>&lt;The goal for many parents is to set up a fund from the birth of li'l Junior which will go toward college.  No stats, I just must talk to more parents and read more than you've been reading on the topic.  No worries, but certainly it's not a basis to insult me and call me superior.  Not when it's a common goal ~ just ask about EVERYBODY on this board!  Then look in the Archives ~ a common discussion topic.&gt;</p><p>It may be a goal and a disportionate amount of parents on this board may plan to do it, but it is not the norm. Both Hazzie and Jams are quite adament that they will not be able fund a college ed for their brood. No worries, that is their financial limitation and their choice. College financial aid may make it possible for their kids to go to same same schools as my kids -- I think that's pretty cool.</p><p>I really don't think you're superior in any way. </p>

 

I've said many times that we are prepared to help our kids through school, We don't touch but add to the investments we've had set up for them, And my points over the years have never changed.  I really don't know what your plans are, All I know is that your kids are older than mine, Isn't one in college by now? 

 


 


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