Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

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Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
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Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:22pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">chestnuthooligan</em> wrote:</div>  Wow - I owed 15K after grad school and agonized over how to pay it (remember I'm very old, it was about year's salary with my first job out of school). The day I sent the last payment, I had hosted party. Debt was not something I ever felt comfortable with. Even so called "good" debt. I lost 5 yrs worth of sleep on living paycheck to paycheck. I'm pretty sure my experience is closer to the norm than yours.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>It takes a certain kind of ego and uber-confidence. <img src="/forums/sites/all/libraries/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/img/smiley-wink.gif" alt="Wink" title="Wink" border="0" />  As a college student and 1L, I knew what my grades were, my schools' reputations and where I was likely heading, short of a major catastrophy.</p>

Most of the Ivy league lawyers I know had zero debt out of school, their confidence in their skills idn't always merit it. (But most were very good).

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:21pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>[quote=jamblessedthree.....<strong>But I get what you mean about encouraging school, Many of my friends' kids are college juniors and seniors who tell me there is no job for them after graduation, So what do they do?  Yes, They stay in school for second degrees and advanced degrees. </strong> My sister's DS finished a pscyh BS program in five years and is moving on to law school, I also have a teacher friend that told me she paid her way through undergraduate school but her parents foot the bill for graduate school b/c it cost more....  Makes &lt;em&gt;I paid for my kid to go to some fancy undergraduate school&lt;/em&gt; sound not so fancy anymore. &lt;/p&gt;
</p><p>Exactly!  It's common for students in this economy to go on for further education.  If they can't afford it, then let's not tell them "they can have it all."  Perpetuating this delusion simply can't be reconciled with the posters here who claim telling children the CAN'T have it all are Debbiedowners.  Nothing could be further from the truth.</p>[/quote]

So since I can afford it, you don't really have a leg to stand on here, do you?

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:20pm
They CAN afford it if they're qualified. They'll get fellowships and tuition waivers. Honest. If they aren't qualified, even if the parents CAN afford it, and they can manage to get admitted somewhere, it's a very expensive gift. It's certainly not an investment in their future.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:19pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>Thanks for the research.  48% of Americans saving for college is pretty good.</p><p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">reginageorge2005</em> wrote:</div>  Moreover, who is stomping on a child's ambition? Aren't most graduate level students 22 or older? Ph.D candidates would be at least what--23 or 24? When did 23 year olds start being classified as children? I've had conversations with (undergrad) advisees in which I've pointed out that if they're failing and miserable in their major classes--they're going to be miserable working FT in that field. That's not crushing dreams, that's reality. &lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;You really don't see the difference in crushing a child's dreams by raising them to believe they can't and helping an adult figure out a reasonable life plan?&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;FWIW, my husband is good at what he does. If our kids want to go to med school at Harvard, we can swing it. But I recognize that we are certainly not normal in that regard.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>The point is, Don't tell children they can have it all if they can't.</p>

That may be your point. It isn't mine. My point is: adults are not children. I'm not going to tell my children they can't have something in adulthood when I have no idea, right now--in their childhood--whether they can have it or not. My five year old wants to be a vet. She won't get grades until fourth grade. At this moment I have no idea, at all, whether her desire to be a vet is achievable or not. I don't know what her propensity for math and science is going to be. She's good at kindy math. But that doesn't mean she'll get calc. At the moment though, it is my job as her mother to encourage her. That's what mothers do.

My oldest is 11 and has no idea what he wants to do. That's okay, too.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:14pm

[quote=jamblessedthree.....But I get what you mean about encouraging school, Many of my friends' kids are college juniors and seniors who tell me there is no job for them after graduation, So what do they do?  Yes, They stay in school for second degrees and advanced degrees.  My sister's DS finished a pscyh BS program in five years and is moving on to law school, I also have a teacher friend that told me she paid her way through undergraduate school but her parents foot the bill for graduate school b/c it cost more....  Makes <em>I paid for my kid to go to some fancy undergraduate school</em> sound not so fancy anymore. </p>[/quote]

Exactly!  It's common for students in this economy to go on for further education.  If they can't afford it, then let's not tell them "they can have it all."  Perpetuating this delusion simply can't be reconciled with the posters here who claim telling children the CAN'T have it all are Debbiedowners.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:12pm

<The goal for many parents is to set up a fund from the birth of li'l Junior which will go toward college.  No stats, I just must talk to more parents and read more than you've been reading on the topic.  No worries, but certainly it's not a basis to insult me and call me superior.  Not when it's a common goal ~ just ask about EVERYBODY on this board!  Then look in the Archives ~ a common discussion topic.>

It may be a goal and a disportionate amount of parents on this board may plan to do it, but it is not the norm. Both Hazzie and Jams are quite adament that they will not be able fund a college ed for their brood. No worries, that is their financial limitation and their choice. College financial aid may make it possible for their kids to go to same same schools as my kids -- I think that's pretty cool.

I really don't think you're superior in any way.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:11pm

Thanks for the research.  48% of Americans saving for college is pretty good.

reginageorge2005 wrote:
  Moreover, who is stomping on a child's ambition? Aren't most graduate level students 22 or older? Ph.D candidates would be at least what--23 or 24? When did 23 year olds start being classified as children? I've had conversations with (undergrad) advisees in which I've pointed out that if they're failing and miserable in their major classes--they're going to be miserable working FT in that field. That's not crushing dreams, that's reality. </p><p>You really don't see the difference in crushing a child's dreams by raising them to believe they can't and helping an adult figure out a reasonable life plan?</p><p>FWIW, my husband is good at what he does. If our kids want to go to med school at Harvard, we can swing it. But I recognize that we are certainly not normal in that regard.</p>

The point is, Don't tell children they can have it all if they can't.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:06pm

chestnuthooligan wrote:
  Wow - I owed 15K after grad school and agonized over how to pay it (remember I'm very old, it was about year's salary with my first job out of school). The day I sent the last payment, I had hosted party. Debt was not something I ever felt comfortable with. Even so called "good" debt. I lost 5 yrs worth of sleep on living paycheck to paycheck. I'm pretty sure my experience is closer to the norm than yours.</p>

It takes a certain kind of ego and uber-confidence. Wink  As a college student and 1L, I knew what my grades were, my schools' reputations and where I was likely heading, short of a major catastrophy.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:01pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">reginageorge2005</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;thardy2001&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&amp;gt;&amp;lt;div class="quote-author"&amp;gt;&amp;lt;em class="placeholder"&amp;gt;bordwithyou&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt; wrote:&amp;lt;/div&amp;gt;  I'm not quite sure what you are asking.  We are prepared to pay for our children's undergraduate college wherever they decide to go.  We are not prepared to pay for graduate school, because it's my belief that if you can't get a tuition waiver and an assistantship for a PhD program, you shouldn't be in it. &amp;amp;lt;/p&amp;amp;gt;&amp;lt;/blockquote&amp;gt;&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;I was curious about your definition of having it all, since you mention applauding kids' ambitions, in the middle of a discussion about "having it all."  &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;I think it's hollow to tell a child he or she can have it all, and at the same time not set aside the tuition, R&amp;amp;amp;B for a postbaccalaureate degree or 2 even in the humanities or when teaching others would be too much of a distraction. You disagree.  And you will tell your children they can have it all? </blockquote></p><p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">reginageorge2005</em> wrote:</div>  Yes, because clearly if you can't afford multiple degrees for your kids, you are a horrible parent. So you're going to fall back on your usual pattern of condescension and economic superiority instead of actually debating the issue at hand? Classic. But I'm going to agree with the academic, who actually has a Ph.D and experience in the field, and her assertation that if you're a candidate who can't get a tuition waiver and assistantship, you shouldn't be in the program. And if you can only handle the program and nothing else, again, I'm going hazard a guess that you shouldn't be in the program. My professor this semester is teaching three graduate level courses, leading an extracurricular course and finishing his book. All while applying for a tenure-track position at the uni (he's currently "visiting") and all of the interviews, presentations, etc involved with that. IOW, he's got a lot going on. In addition to his young family. If he couldn't juggle an assistantship with his studies, he couldn't manage the balancing act he's got going on now. And I know he did that b/c I've seen his CV...</blockquote></p><p>Is it really condescending and "economically superior" to save money for college and an advanced degree?  So many in America are doing the same.  The other part about stomping on a person's ambitions to get a Masters or PhD ~ that's completely foreign to me.  I don't see reconciling the suppression of a child's ambitions  in education with your notion of telling a child she can have it all.  Can you explain?</p>

You'd be surprised how many high income people my DH runs into who have very little savings: for college or otherwise. Do you have any legitimately published statistics to back up your claim here? I found this: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/25/americans-saving-college-tuition_n_1703593.html

Then there is this: http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2012/10/19/survey-40-percent-of-americans-have-500-or-less-in-savings/

The last time I checked, 48% represents a minority, not majority of Americans. So, I wouldn't say that "so many in America are doing the same" when 52% of Americans aren't. 40% of the population doesn't have $500 in savings, much less hundreds of thousands for a possible Ph.D. Moreover, the readily available statistics I just showed you are far more in line with what I hear my husband (a financial advisor) quoting regularly.

Moreover, who is stomping on a child's ambition? Aren't most graduate level students 22 or older? Ph.D candidates would be at least what--23 or 24? When did 23 year olds start being classified as children? I've had conversations with (undergrad) advisees in which I've pointed out that if they're failing and miserable in their major classes--they're going to be miserable working FT in that field. That's not crushing dreams, that's reality. 

You really don't see the difference in crushing a child's dreams by raising them to believe they can't and helping an adult figure out a reasonable life plan?

FWIW, my husband is good at what he does. If our kids want to go to med school at Harvard, we can swing it. But I recognize that we are certainly not normal in that regard.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 9:00pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>   If "teaching others" while in pursuit of a degree in the humanities is "too much of distraction," perhaps one ought to consider a different career..... </blockquote></p><p>Me:  Ooh, bad advice.  I know of 2 PhD grads who found teaching students to whom English was a second language onerous.  Obviously, they didn't consider a different career which would be insane just because their teaching responsibilities were distracting.</p><p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author">Quote:</div> One should also not be paying for an advanced degree in the humanities.  If someone isn't paying you to get it, something is wrong.  </blockquote></p><p>Me:  Ooh, wrong again.  It's 2013.  People pay for law school themselves.  People pay for PhDs in many humanities because they are not being asked to publish, a professor doesn't need another grad student doing research, etc.  Lots of students have to pay.  I never heard of advising someone NOT to pursue his dream of getting a PhD.  I thought that was your thing too ~ your ambitious while others might not be, you pursue your goals and can't envision life any other way even if the goals won't be met.</p><p>In this instance, advising someone not to pursue his dream of getting a PhD strikes me as odd.  These days and in this job market, more than before, some students will have to pay for their advanced degrees themselves.</p>

 

But you don't just decide to get a PhD, Aren't you selected from a poll of applicants?  Please explain..  But I get what you mean about encouraging school, Many of my friends' kids are college juniors and seniors who tell me there is no job for them after graduation, So what do they do?  Yes, They stay in school for second degrees and advanced degrees.  My sister's DS finished a pscyh BS program in five years and is moving on to law school, I also have a teacher friend that told me she paid her way through undergraduate school but her parents foot the bill for graduate school b/c it cost more....  Makes I paid for my kid to go to some fancy undergraduate school sound not so fancy anymore. 

 


 


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