Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
350
Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:19am

Do you teach online classes too, Bord?

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:16am

I remember meeting a neighbor who told me she "telecommuted", That was 10+ years ago and I had no clue what that meant, Lol.  She traveled SOME but mostly WAH. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:08am

Yes puss, Many moms with minor children are blessed to SAH! 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:07am

hazeleyes, It's one thing to do work from home now and then and another thing all together to do your job from home and expect = benefits and pay as someone that goes to the office, IMO that's what Mayer was getting at and I doubt it was a decision she made overnight.  There was a segment on the today show yesterday about this (but I missed it b/c I had to be at school, darn, Lol!)

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 2:37am

@Thardy2001:  Yes, it is completely transparent to all parties, including stakeholders, that my employer has a written policy which allows people in my group paid gym time because of the specific physical fitness requirements.  Do you have a problem with that?  Too bad.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-09-2009
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 10:38pm
I haven't investigated it, so this is just anecdotal, but the majority of people that I know who work at home don't even have kids, so the issues are not about childcare. More often than not, it's the commute. I work from home time to time, and it's usually not about childcare at all.... I can take my kids to work with me if I need to (but I can't remember the last time I did that, lol).

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Ducky

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 8:54pm

double post

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 8:52pm

As I've stated previously. I actually have worked at home for 13 years. All successful WAH employees with small children that I know (many), have childcare or nannies. I am also a manager of WAH employees.

If WAH employees have no childcare and small children, then can not do their jobs, and it is readily apparent.

Some in office employees with less than adequate childcare, are equally inept.

My company is pretty successful with its business model. WAH for some, in office required for some collaboration, and customer facing as often as possible for most.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 8:25pm

ashmama wrote:
<p>I think this is a more complex issue than just wanting to increase the productivity of each worker. She's head of a struggling company and is probably searching for anything that will increase not only productivity, but creativity. Sometimes the creative energy needed to turn a company around can only be generated when a lot of employees are together in an office (or in the case of Yahoo, many offices), bouncing ideas back and forth. You can do that via technology, but it's not as spontaneous as a bunch of people all talking at once in a conference room.</p><p>I do feel bad for the people whose lives this will disrupt, but I bet if Marissa Mayer succeeds in turning Yahoo around, she'll ease up on the WAH restriction.</p>

Very complex.  The more reading I do, the more it seems the few companies allowing WAH have employees who want to combine childcare and work.  I just don't see that as a good thing ~ in the end the employer, by way of the stockholders, pay for the childcare.  It doesn't seem like a company many would want to invest in, even if it works for other tech companies.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 8:19pm

If it's a "break" from the workday, I gather your employer is not paying you to go to the gym.  He is however paying you (and Desmontespan??) for the time you choose to take off and go to the gym.  That's a nice set up you've made for yourself.  Enjoy.

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