Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
350
Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 5:49pm

<It's hard to work and be at the gym.  I'm not sure what kind of job you have, but do you really think an employer who has to answer to stockholders, pays employees to go to the gym?  It's sanctioned, but is the employer paying for gym time?>

I am a WAH and have been one for 13 years. My last physical workplace had an on site gym. I will often take a break during the day to run or workout, and I often use this time to outline proposals, work through ongoing problems, or just clear my head from work clutter that's affecting my productivity.

I get paid for doing my job and my job does not require eyesight supervision with my manager. It also does not require fixed hours 9-5hrs. Personal work ethic and professional skill are the drivers of productivity in my profession, and it does not matter if you work in an office, at a client site, or at home.

I do have profit targets to meet and I've met or exceeded all targets every quarter that I've worked at this position.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 5:13pm

demontespan wrote:
  I work from home one day a week.  While I cannot speak for others, I find that I am more productive at home.  I enjoy the flexibility, such as going to the gym during mid-morning when it is less crowded instead of first thing in the morning (I hate to break my day at the office by half with a trip to the gym).  Because my job has a fitness requirement, a certain amount of gym time is "sanctioned".  My employer has strings attached (as well as exceptions) to working at home.  For example, if I am aboslutely needed at a face to face meeting, they can call me back in the office with an hour or two's notice. ......

I've been out of the workforce many years, but are you really more productive on the day you WAH?  It's hard to work and be at the gym.  I'm not sure what kind of job you have, but do you really think an employer who has to answer to stockholders, pays employees to go to the gym?  It's sanctioned, but is the employer paying for gym time?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 5:06pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
My brother's wife was a WAHM but the company went through a buyout and she accepted some package and left herself, They had a nanny when she worked and I think the reality is that you can't give it all to your job and your kids at the same time!  If WAH has backfired and Mayer sets an example for other women moving up the ranks, Good for her.

Mayer says it's a phenomenon special to Yahoo only, not an industry wide thing.  I think that was a good way for her to handle it.  Clearly, at Google and her previous jobs, she's seen abuse by those WAH.  I say this because she's only been on the job a short time and this ban is truly a sea change in policy.

I bet other tech companies ~ if not many companies ~ will follow suit.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-29-2007
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 2:56pm

WAH is a wonderful option for both men and women. With todays technology, business is conducted at all hours of the day regardless of location.  Look at the increase with online schooling and banking. People work differently with different styles, this should definitely be an option for the anyone interested in working from home.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 2:38pm

I've read some speculation that Yahoo needs to downsize its workforce, and of course if you change working conditions, some people may leave voluntarily.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Wed, 02-27-2013 - 2:28pm

I think this is a more complex issue than just wanting to increase the productivity of each worker. She's head of a struggling company and is probably searching for anything that will increase not only productivity, but creativity. Sometimes the creative energy needed to turn a company around can only be generated when a lot of employees are together in an office (or in the case of Yahoo, many offices), bouncing ideas back and forth. You can do that via technology, but it's not as spontaneous as a bunch of people all talking at once in a conference room.

I do feel bad for the people whose lives this will disrupt, but I bet if Marissa Mayer succeeds in turning Yahoo around, she'll ease up on the WAH restriction.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 10:15pm

I work from home one day a week.  While I cannot speak for others, I find that I am more productive at home.  I enjoy the flexibility, such as going to the gym during mid-morning when it is less crowded instead of first thing in the morning (I hate to break my day at the office by half with a trip to the gym).  Because my job has a fitness requirement, a certain amount of gym time is "sanctioned".  My employer has strings attached (as well as exceptions) to working at home.  For example, if I am aboslutely needed at a face to face meeting, they can call me back in the office with an hour or two's notice. This has happened a few times.  On the other hand, during the recent snow storm, I was allowed to work at home more than one day a week. 

As to whether my employer trust me to actually getting any work done, I travel about 50% for work.  If they trust me when I am 2000 miles away from the office, why won't they trust me 20 miles away from the office?

Many of my male colleagues also take advantage of the option to work at home 1 - 2 days per week for various reasons.  Even those who are single appreciate the ability to reduce commute time, save gas, and work in the comfort of their own home.  So regardless of the family status of an employee, Mayer's move may eventually turn away employees who value that flexibility.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 6:11pm

Cmmelissa wrote:
BTW, what do you think about her having a crib in her office?

I don't have an issue with it.  Think of movies where the executive has a putting set up in the office.  (and I don't object to the idea of something like that, either, as a means of redirecting one's self during the day.  Sometimes if you're mulling over an issue, changing focus can lead you to a solution that's eluded you--I've done it often enough while sewing.)

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 5:17pm
Yes it is. I wish she could relate to the challenges that her employees face on a daily basis, trying to juggle parenting, work, etc.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 4:36pm
It's evidently not just a crib she's got in her office. She's got a whole nursery suite and nanny. It's good to be queen.

Pages