Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
350
Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

Pages

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 4:21pm
BTW, what do you think about her having a crib in her office?

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 4:18pm

Here is a response from the CEO of DailyWorth, Amanda Steinberg:

http://posts.dailyworth.com/posts/1739-from-one-ceo-mom-to-another#readmore

She stresses that what you need in today's workplace is flexibility.  Allow employees the time to handle school drops offs/pickups, working from home when you have sick children, allow time for school events and doctors appointments, etc.  She also thinks this same type of flexibility needs to extend to anyone that has the primary care of a loved one, including aging parents.  

What do you think about her response?

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 1:27pm

In his current job, my husband does not work from home (though he's just waiting until we get the bad weather, then his boss will likely change her tune).  But, in his last position, he worked from home two days a week.  His commute was horrible, and his working from home was a huge blessing.  I have the ability to do my physical work from home, and often do, but there is a relational aspect to my job that requires face time on a consistent basis.  But, it is nice that if the kids are home from school, or if the roads are bad due to weather, that I don't have to go out.  Even on a relational level, the weather effects us all, so rescheduling appointments and meetings is kind of a no brainer, and we've already scheduled around the school calendar.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-22-2000
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 10:43am

reginageorge2005 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;Regina, The cool thing about "having it all" is that each of us gets to decide what that means for us.  My life isn't for everyone, but I have pretty much all I have ever wanted.  Well, I never got to meet Neil Armstrong, that's one regret....but other than that?  I've been somewhat lucky, extremely blessed, and I have worked hard -- and continue to work hard.  I am content.  I wish that on everyone.  I don't wish some cookie-cutter television series perfect "having it all" life on anyone -- because it might not be even what particular people want.  I don't want to tell my kids they can't "have it all."   Because it they are careful, thoughtful, and lucky, then can have an awful lot. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>It bugs me that no one ever says men "can't have it all." As the mother of a daughter, that drives me bananas.</p>

 

If you came to my office, you'd hear it said about men quite a bit.  It's really not worth the trip just for that, though.  Cool


iVillage Member
Registered: 12-08-2011
Tue, 02-26-2013 - 1:37am

It can go either way.  I worked with some people who "worked" at home and they took major advantage of it.  Others were probably as productive as they were at the office.  I have mixed feelings about working at home because I saw too many people abuse it. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-24-2012
Mon, 02-25-2013 - 3:46pm

Off the bat, I'd think it must be difficult to manage employees when not on site f-t.  There used to be a saying, when the boss is away, employees will play.  

Maybe if companies would actually look at the research insted of just assuming or believing in "sayings",  WAH would be more accepted:

http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2012/08/working-from-home-youre-a-better-worker/

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Mon, 02-25-2013 - 3:17pm

Greeneyes2013 wrote:
Is there now something in the iVIllage TOS that states we can't poke fun at ourselves during a debate? If so, I will go back to Delphi. lol</p>

LOL, well, there's never been any danger I would leave Delphi, but yeah, apparently a little self-fun-poking appears to be quite offensive to some.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Mon, 02-25-2013 - 2:23pm

bordwithyou wrote:
<p>Regina, The cool thing about "having it all" is that each of us gets to decide what that means for us.  My life isn't for everyone, but I have pretty much all I have ever wanted.  Well, I never got to meet Neil Armstrong, that's one regret....but other than that?  I've been somewhat lucky, extremely blessed, and I have worked hard -- and continue to work hard.  I am content.  I wish that on everyone.  I don't wish some cookie-cutter television series perfect "having it all" life on anyone -- because it might not be even what particular people want.  I don't want to tell my kids they can't "have it all."   Because it they are careful, thoughtful, and lucky, then can have an awful lot. </p>

It bugs me that no one ever says men "can't have it all." As the mother of a daughter, that drives me bananas.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 02-25-2013 - 2:13pm

Regina, The cool thing about "having it all" is that each of us gets to decide what that means for us.  My life isn't for everyone, but I have pretty much all I have ever wanted.  Well, I never got to meet Neil Armstrong, that's one regret....but other than that?  I've been somewhat lucky, extremely blessed, and I have worked hard -- and continue to work hard.  I am content.  I wish that on everyone.  I don't wish some cookie-cutter television series perfect "having it all" life on anyone -- because it might not be even what particular people want.  I don't want to tell my kids they can't "have it all."   Because it they are careful, thoughtful, and lucky, then can have an awful lot. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Mon, 02-25-2013 - 2:05pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>  Or perhaps just smart enough to recognize that you can't have it all. </blockquote></p><p>Very wise, Jam.  When it comes to work <em>and</em> family, women just can't have it all.  Thank you.</p>

What about men? Why do they get to have it all but women can't? To hear women say things like this makes my blood boil. I SAH because it works for my family. But as the mother of a daughter, I certainly do NOT want her growing up thinking that she can't juggle work and a family if she so desires. My sister is the breadwinner of her very young and rather large family. She's a great mom and absolutely outstanding at what she does professionally. She would absolutely disagree with the pair of you (who, correct me if I'm wrong, but haven't actually tried to juggle WOH and a family--so how exactly would you know if you haven't done it?). She manages to work FT at a demanding job with crazy hours, raise her four kids with her DH, and do all the normal mommy things the rest of us do, like volunteer at their school. I'd say she's got it all.

When I started on this board, I was a newly minted SAHM who had it all figured out. I was absolutely militant in my beliefs that SAH was the best option. 11 years later--I'm embarrassed by my narrow-mindedness. Most of my mommy friends work. Since I started grad school last fall, I admire their juggling act more than ever. I am glad that my daughter has all sorts of role models in her life: from SAHMs like me to her aunt on tv, to the teachers (working moms, all of them) who've influenced her over her very short academic career.

Comments like this are exactly why the glass ceiling is cracked but not broken. And we, as women, do it to each other. Disgusting.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

Pages