Mental health fluff

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mental health fluff
106
Tue, 10-22-2013 - 11:12am

Since some questions were left unanswered on the other thread, here goes:

1. Do you have personal experience, yourself or someone close to you, of going through a mental illness, either severe like bipolar or schizophrenia, or less serious like anxiety or PPD that required treatment?

2. Do you consider it stigmatizing to have a mentally ill family member? IOW, if you have been in this situation, is it something you talk to others about or do you try to avoid the subject?

3. Do you consider mental illness to be a controversial subject, and if so, in what way?

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Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 10-28-2013 - 1:31pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
I don't thik there's ever too much awareness or education about any one subject or illness like talked about here. When you limit it or compare one against another like mops is doing I think you hit a slippery slope, If I'm going to wear a tshirt to support somebody with a MI I'm also going to wear a tshirt to support somebody with cancer, diabetes or another illness too.

Well then you better be prepared to wear nothing but supporting t-shirts everyday ...

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 10-28-2013 - 1:35pm

rollmops2009 wrote:
"If I'm going to wear a tshirt to support somebody with a MI I'm also going to wear a tshirt to support somebody with cancer, diabetes or another illness too." ------ If it just about support, take the ten bucks you would spend on the T-shirt and donate it to an appropriate research foundation. If it is about raising awareness, figure out something that will actually be meaningful and worthwhile.

Tangentially relevant. The organization through which I donate blood usually has a free t-shirt, zoo tickets, etc for donors.  Sometimes I take the freebie (especially the zoo tickets!), but often I don't ... and they have a form where you can ask to have $10 donated to a related cause instead.  (I forget what the cause is ... and their website keeps crashing today).

 

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 10-28-2013 - 2:07pm
"and they have a form where you can ask to have $10 donated to a related cause instead." ----- That's a good idea.
Avatar for BeaArthurisMyReligion
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 1:00pm

'No evidence of said illness doesn't make someone a survivor?  Well, golly, tell that to many many women who are five, ten, twenty + years cancer free. '

one of my best friends in the whole world was 17 years cancer free.. and it came back and metastasized to her bones and killed her in 6 months.  She was one of the first to tell you that the term 'cancer survivor' is inaccurate in most cases...and that the spectre of cancer never goes away... she was saying that years before her cancer came back...

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 2:22pm
"one of my best friends in the whole world was 17 years cancer free.. and it came back and metastasized to her bones and killed her in 6 months." ------ Yep, unfortunately that has to be part of the picture. It is not to be a total downer, but just the reality. Thanks to new and better treatments, patients are living longer and better and many, many women who have been through breast cancer will achieve a long life and a non-cancer death.The other aspect of this is that in order to live longer/better, many of us never finish treatment. Which is another reason to think of breast cancer as a chronic disease. In my case, for example, I take a pill every day to keep the cancer dormant. It is working and I am very grateful that I have this little, yellow pill to take, but I will be taking it for at least 10 years, and possibly longer, unless they come up with something better in the meantime.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2013
Wed, 11-20-2013 - 3:33pm

My sister was just recently diagnosed bi-polar after having a terrifying psychotic manic episode.  My family is now having to face her mental illness head on and try to get her some help.  I believe the stigma around mental inllness is why my parents waited so long to seek help for her.  She finally got to a point where her behaviour could not be ignored.

I would love to hear from other people who have experienced bi-polar success stories.  I guess the big thing is that she does not want to take her medication.  This makes sense...she is manic right now and feeling on top of the world.  How do we help someone come to terms with their own mental illness?  It's such a delicate subject... 

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