Mental health fluff

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mental health fluff
106
Tue, 10-22-2013 - 11:12am

Since some questions were left unanswered on the other thread, here goes:

1. Do you have personal experience, yourself or someone close to you, of going through a mental illness, either severe like bipolar or schizophrenia, or less serious like anxiety or PPD that required treatment?

2. Do you consider it stigmatizing to have a mentally ill family member? IOW, if you have been in this situation, is it something you talk to others about or do you try to avoid the subject?

3. Do you consider mental illness to be a controversial subject, and if so, in what way?

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Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:39am

rollmops2009 wrote:
Of course each illness has its particularities. However, it also seems to me that most chronic illnesses, whether cancer, diabetes, heart disease or mental illness, have many things in common beyond just being illnesses.

You said this much better than I did. 

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:40am

rollmops2009 wrote:
"Opening up a topic of conversation like this with somebody like MIL would probably hinder the cause b/c her views are so closed minded. That is why, for us anyway, we've become very careful about what we do and don't share." ----------- That is really horrible, but I can understand why you leave it alone.

Agreed.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:42am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>That's probably why I like walks/rallies/marches for breast cancer, for diabetes, for NAMI and such. You are around like minded people that want to support the cause.  Even if they donate a dime you know their presense means something and that's far less exhausting than trying to change ignorance or closed mindedness.</p>

I agree that it's far less exhausting - but it's also far less effective.   There's nothing gained in the fight against <<insert cause>> if it is the same supporters all the time.  To really effect change - scientifically, societally -- then you have to change ignorance or closed mindedness.  IMO.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:43am

rollmops2009 wrote:
"That's probably why I like walks/rallies/marches for breast cancer, for diabetes, for NAMI and such. You are around like minded people that want to support the cause." -------- Ok, I can see what you mean, but I admit that I don't really see the point of hanging around people who already get it. Those things often seem more like pep rallies, and often it is questionable what they accomplish.

Okay, I need to just follow you around with a big "thumbs up - what she said" sign

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:49am
Blaming parents is a myth, emphasis on blame. Children with MI are less likely to improve without supportve and involved parents in the process however, and I believe that is easier said than done b/c there are a lot of parents living in denial of said illnesses or that claim the problem only belongs to their child.

 


 


Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:51am

jamblessedthree wrote:
Blaming parents is a myth, emphasis on blame. Children with MI are less likely to improve without supportve and involved parents in the process however, and I believe that is easier said than done b/c there are a lot of parents living in denial of said illnesses or that claim the problem only belongs to their child.


Blaming parents is a myth, emphasis on blame -- A myth in what way? It is a myth that parent are to blame - they are not.  But it is not a myth that some people still believe that - I've experienced  it. 

with MI are less likely to improve without supportve and involved parents in the process however, and I believe that is easier said than done b/c there are a lot of parents living in denial of said illnesses or that claim the problem only belongs to their child -- which is exactly why we need to educate people, and talk about it, and change that closed mindedness and ignorance.   This is exactly why it needs to be viewed as an illness/disease like cancer or diabetes.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:55am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<That starts with you.  There is no way you can change somebody else's mind until you change the way you look at things too.  I disagree and I think these rallies/marches and all do a wonderful job raising awareness, JMO. </p>

But if I'm already supportive, and educated, and open-minded ... MY mind doesn't need to change.  I think those things do raise some awareness ... and they definitely raise funds (some more than others ... don't get me started on "mail your yogurt lid in and we'll donate 1/10th of a penny!" crap.)   But I think one-on-one conversations, real-life experiences and personal connections raise a lot more awareness and effect a lot more change than a 5k walk does.    I participate in some of theose walks, etc - but I do it because my money is needed - not because the walk makes me more aware.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:55am

savcal2011 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;That's probably why I like walks/rallies/marches for breast cancer, for diabetes, for NAMI and such. You are around like minded people that want to support the cause.  Even if they donate a dime you know their presense means something and that's far less exhausting than trying to change ignorance or closed mindedness.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I agree that it's far less exhausting - but it's also far less effective.   There's nothing gained in the fight against &lt;&lt;insert cause&gt;&gt; if it is the same supporters all the time.  To really effect change - scientifically, societally -- then you have to change ignorance or closed mindedness.  IMO.</p>

That starts with you.  There is no way you can change how somebody else thinks until you change the way you are or see things too.  While not the ONLY way to raise awareness these rallies/marches do a wonderful job reaching out to others, We disagree about that there. 

 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:56am

rollmops2009 wrote:
"That's probably why I like walks/rallies/marches for breast cancer, for diabetes, for NAMI and such. You are around like minded people that want to support the cause." -------- Ok, I can see what you mean, but I admit that I don't really see the point of hanging around people who already get it. Those things often seem more like pep rallies, and often it is questionable what they accomplish.

I get what she's saying to a certain degree, I have taken the time to educate my friend group (that also includes a lot of kids the same ages as mine) because it's easier for them to help my kid in social situations, about ADHD but every once in awhile I still get a flaky or uneducated comment about my kids behavior that is due to ADHD.  It can be frustrating at times but it's also frustrating to read comments from others who have children with different issues making uneducated comments.  I get my friends lack of understanding at times but those who have been on the receiving end of those types of comments, I don't get.  Thankfully I didn't have to educate my family but I can also see why Queen spends time and effort to continue to educate her family about life threatening allergies because it's not just frustration, close mindness or ignorance that she would have to deal with if they choose not to listen.  


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Wed, 10-23-2013 - 11:58am

savcal2011 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;That's probably why I like walks/rallies/marches for breast cancer, for diabetes, for NAMI and such. You are around like minded people that want to support the cause.  Even if they donate a dime you know their presense means something and that's far less exhausting than trying to change ignorance or closed mindedness.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I agree that it's far less exhausting - but it's also far less effective.   There's nothing gained in the fight against &lt;&lt;insert cause&gt;&gt; if it is the same supporters all the time.  To really effect change - scientifically, societally -- then you have to change ignorance or closed mindedness.  IMO.</p>

Well said.  

PumpkinAngel

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