Misogyny in the Catholic Church

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Misogyny in the Catholic Church
41
Wed, 04-17-2013 - 12:18am

Since I'm currently taking a history class focused on early religion (pre-reformation, so there is no other church but the Catholic church), I'm repeatedly struck by the absolute misogyny of the Medieval Church. The portrayal of women as she-devils and amount of propoganda (Peter Damian is one to read) positively villifying women culminating with Pope Gregory VII's reforms in the 11th century positively take my breath away. 

While I realize why it was done: get rid of simony & lay investiture (corruption), centralize power & reestablish the papacy as the dominating geo-political force in the region and the patriarichal context of the society at the time, History was rewritten to wipe out the fact that women (deaconesses, wives of priests) served right along side the men for the first millineum of the church's existence. Now, in the third millineum, I am struck by the fact that, women are still second class citizens in the Catholic Church. 

Galatians 3:28  says "There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus." So how do you come to terms with a faith in which you are not equal (or worthy of ordination/performing sacraments) because of your genitalia?

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 04-18-2013 - 2:09pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
As I sit here watching nbc televise the interfaith service in Boston my thoughts are this about the faithful, That we continue to respect all faiths not tear any down.

Have you ever heard of the phrase "constructive criticism?" 

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 04-18-2013 - 11:45am
As I sit here watching nbc televise the interfaith service in Boston my thoughts are this about the faithful, That we continue to respect all faiths not tear any down.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 04-18-2013 - 11:36am
I bow to your knowlege bord... Well written!

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 04-18-2013 - 11:33am
You are compelled to point out? Huh, Lol! Jesus was a jew too.

 


 


Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Wed, 04-17-2013 - 3:07pm
"It's probably the "prettiest" Greek." ---------- Yes, I imagine that it is the reason, that it is the "cleanest" Greek.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Wed, 04-17-2013 - 3:05pm

rollmops2009 wrote:
Bord, not sure why, but for Greek, it is common to use John.

 It's probably the "prettiest" Greek.   It's the prettiest Latin, too, but because of that, more difficult for beginners.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Wed, 04-17-2013 - 3:01pm
Bord, not sure why, but for Greek, it is common to use John.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Wed, 04-17-2013 - 1:58pm

rollmops2009 wrote:
"that's an interesting story right there." ---------- Dh is full of good stories ;) It was because they wanted to learn Greek in order to read the Bible. So dh offered to do the Gospel of John instead of the Plato that you usually do in the 3rd semester. Soon enough they started arguing with him about the text, i.e. that there must be mistakes in the gospel, since it didn't line up with their translation. Dh explained to them that if there was a mistake it was in the translation, not in the original. In the course of explaining this, he introduced them to the Greek church fathers and the rest is history.

John, hunh?  That's an interesting place to start.  I use Luke/Acts when I use the Vulgate to teach Latin.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Wed, 04-17-2013 - 1:26pm

rollmops2009 wrote:
"that's an interesting story right there." ---------- Dh is full of good stories ;) It was because they wanted to learn Greek in order to read the Bible. So dh offered to do the Gospel of John instead of the Plato that you usually do in the 3rd semester. Soon enough they started arguing with him about the text, i.e. that there must be mistakes in the gospel, since it didn't line up with their translation. Dh explained to them that if there was a mistake it was in the translation, not in the original. In the course of explaining this, he introduced them to the Greek church fathers and the rest is history.

DH and I just had a discussion about the accuracy of biblical translations this morning. NeoPlatism is a frequent topic of discussion in class since it had such an impact on early doctrine...

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Wed, 04-17-2013 - 1:15pm
"that's an interesting story right there." ---------- Dh is full of good stories ;) It was because they wanted to learn Greek in order to read the Bible. So dh offered to do the Gospel of John instead of the Plato that you usually do in the 3rd semester. Soon enough they started arguing with him about the text, i.e. that there must be mistakes in the gospel, since it didn't line up with their translation. Dh explained to them that if there was a mistake it was in the translation, not in the original. In the course of explaining this, he introduced them to the Greek church fathers and the rest is history.

Pages