Monday Fluff

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Monday Fluff
156
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 8:34am

What separates private school from public school IYO?

What school memories stand out about your own schooling?  Did you attend public schools or "private"?

What did you want to be when you grew up?

As a side, What's your weather like today? :)

 


 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 9:31pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>Thus, the term "reasonable accomodations." </p>

And were their accommodations for your inability to comprehend the written word sufficiently reasonable, do you think?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 9:30pm

just_another_marla wrote:
<p>Another difference between public and private schools are certification levels of teachers. My brother and his wife are teachers. She just graduated from an education program where she had to meet all kinds of criteria to become certified to teach in public schools. My brother doesn't have a single education class under his belt, just a master's degree in theology and no certifications, but he landed a job as a Catholic high school teacher. </p>

There are some exceptions in the public school too.  My 10 year old's technology teacher has an associates degree in computers or technology, something like that.  She isn't certified but she is on her way there.  But yea, a lot of private schools get around certifications all together, My sister taught in the catholic schools for 8 years.  She has a bachelors degree in education but never became state certified.  That school didn't require it. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 9:26pm

It's not Ronan Catholic. I don't know what you do now but you're no Catholic history teacher.

 

 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 9:24pm

Thus, the term "reasonable accomodations." 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 9:21pm

thardy2001 wrote:
Oh, naive little Grapthars H.  In this day and age, if the Headmaster of a private school were so forthcoming as to say Johnny was turned down because of his handicap, you might have an argument there.  That would never happen.  What happens is a lawsuit, then discovery and it becomes clear Johnny was rejected because of his handicap and how Snow White Academy just didn't feel like retrofitting and installing a ramp or an elevator.  All Johnny's attorney has to prove is "an inference of discrimination" based on his disability.  When Lilly White Academy naturally has a history of accepting siblings, it has accepted all of Johnny's siblings and Johnny has a straight A average upon application, as well as excelling in debate, olympiads and the cello, violin and viola, then there's an inference of discrimination when he's rejected.     </p>

Gracious, I hope you've sued the school which is responsible for your abysmal readings skills. =:o

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 9:19pm
The private school my kids went to was pretty forthcoming about what special needs they could and could not accommodate. They had no provisions for kids with learning disabilities, and unlike the public schools, they didn't pretend that they had.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 8:49pm

grapthars_hammer wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">thardy2001</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&amp;lt;&amp;lt;Private schools are not subject to NCLB and they can hand pick their students, thus limiting or eliminating any need to cater to special needs.  This doesn't mean they DO limit or exclude, simply that they have the absolute right to do so and the parents have no legal recourse should they do so.&amp;gt;&amp;gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;No one has an absolute right to discriminate based on a disability.  A private school can't even suggest it's excluding a child in a wheelchair because he's in a wheelchair.  It has to make reasonable accomodations under federal law.  Nor can a private school turn away an applicant because he has a learning disability or mental impairment.  Again, reasonable accomodations would have to be made.  It's irrelevant who the defendant is.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>Not true; they don't have to give any reason at all for denial of enrollment.  Private schools can exclude where ever and however they choose.  And as they need give no reason at all for doing so, there's no recourse on the grounds of discrimination for the reasons you're suggesting. </p><p>As I said originally (and as you seem to be completely ignoring in your rush to disagree) the fact that such schools CAN do so doesn't mean they WILL do so. But their freedom to handpick their student population at will is a huge difference from public schools.</p>

Oh, naive little Grapthars H.  In this day and age, if the Headmaster of a private school were so forthcoming as to say Johnny was turned down because of his handicap, you might have an argument there.  That would never happen.  What happens is a lawsuit, then discovery and it becomes clear Johnny was rejected because of his handicap and how Snow White Academy just didn't feel like retrofitting and installing a ramp or an elevator.  All Johnny's attorney has to prove is "an inference of discrimination" based on his disability.  When Lilly White Academy naturally has a history of accepting siblings, it has accepted all of Johnny's siblings and Johnny has a straight A average upon application, as well as excelling in debate, olympiads and the cello, violin and viola, then there's an inference of discrimination when he's rejected.    

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 8:30pm

grapthars_hammer wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">thardy2001</em> wrote:</div>Superficially, tuition.  The truth though is that some school districts tax so highly, there's not much difference in the quality of the schools.  Also, a parent's desire for their kid to repeat the academic experience they had.  Or a parent's desire to shield their kid from bad public schools and/or get them into small classes for one-on-one attention&lt;/p&gt;&lt;/div&gt;&lt;/div&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</blockquote></p><p>Even superficially, I would think tuition to be one of the smallest differences between private and public schools.  And I completely disagree that as a general rule private schools are superior to public ones.  Look at the proliferation of private schools that have emerged so that whack job conservative Christians can teach the folk lore of creationism as "science".</p>

That's nice because I never said (and will never say) private schools are superior to public schools.  I never attended public schools.  I went to parochial schools until 9th grade which was a private high school.  I think a good public school is far superior to all of the coddling and hand-holding that goes on at the private schools in California, NY and New England.  A satisfactory (and top notch) public school is just better because it's more real world.  In the real world, there isn't all of this after school one-on-one tutelage for the kids who don't want to study.  And I'm on board with the whole "teaching to the test" because if Johnny doesn't have repeat experience with the standardized test, he'll be at a disadvantage.  Private schools don't prepare kids for all of that.  I hear exactly what Jamblessed is saying and agree where satisfactory to top-notch public schools are concerned.  (Anyone in a run-down public or private is going to be at a disadvantage).

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 7:52pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Yea, Only a rock would assume you don't teach religous education in catholic schools spring.  Lol.  And a nice alternative is religous education sometime during the week.  When DS was preparing for first communion his class was full of both the public school kids + catholic school kids.  That was nice, When I was a kid that was all separated. </p><p> </p><p> </p>

That's such a great idea.  Here, our parish is so large, I think the Catholic school understandably wants the sacraments celebrated separately.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Mon, 06-17-2013 - 7:48pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>&lt;&lt;Private schools are not subject to NCLB and they can hand pick their students, thus limiting or eliminating any need to cater to special needs.  This doesn't mean they DO limit or exclude, simply that they have the absolute right to do so and the parents have no legal recourse should they do so.&gt;&gt;</p><p>No one has an absolute right to discriminate based on a disability.  A private school can't even suggest it's excluding a child in a wheelchair because he's in a wheelchair.  It has to make reasonable accomodations under federal law.  Nor can a private school turn away an applicant because he has a learning disability or mental impairment.  Again, reasonable accomodations would have to be made.  It's irrelevant who the defendant is.</p>

Not true; they don't have to give any reason at all for denial of enrollment.  Private schools can exclude where ever and however they choose.  And as they need give no reason at all for doing so, there's no recourse on the grounds of discrimination for the reasons you're suggesting. 

As I said originally (and as you seem to be completely ignoring in your rush to disagree) the fact that such schools CAN do so doesn't mean they WILL do so. But their freedom to handpick their student population at will is a huge difference from public schools.

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