!! Monday !!

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
!! Monday !!
168
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 7:52am

If you are married, How many years did you wait- if any - to have children after getting married?

Are there any things you miss doing before kids?  If so, what?

Is your life now what you expected it would be 10 or 20 years ago? 

At what point do you self actualize?  Do you believe in it?

What's on your agenda this week?

 

 

 

 


 


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Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:15am

If you are married, How many years did you wait- if any - to have children after getting married? -- Xh and I waited 4 years.

Are there any things you miss doing before kids?  If so, what? -- Not really anymore.   The Kids don't prevent us from stuff as much as schedules, work, and money do.

Is your life now what you expected it would be 10 or 20 years ago? -- No. Not at all really.

At what point do you self actualize?  Do you believe in it? - Ehh, I've never thought about it in those terms.  I don't overthink my life in general. (Although I'm notorious for overthinking the small things.)

What's on your agenda this week? -- Work, running, kickboxing, Zumba, Lunch with The Boy today after his ortho appt, lunch with The Kids and dh on Wednesday when we renew his vehicle registration. We're going to a local amusement park on Saturday. Will try to find some time to veg by the pool in the evenings. My SIL and her dh and their two kids come in either late Sat night or early Sunday and will spend the day and night with us, heading back out on Monday morning. We'll go to Eskimo Joes for bacon cheese fries with them, and the kids will swim, etc.  It will be really nice to spend that kind of time with them.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
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Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:19am

jamblessedthree wrote:
Self actualization is very real in the psychology world and it's a theory professionals in the field defend.  I agree it isn't something an individual recognizes in him/herself but I do see it as a point of peace instead of chasing some inflated dream or goal anymore. </p>

Is it real like cartoon characters?

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:24am

savcal2011 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>Self actualization is very real in the psychology world and it's a theory professionals in the field defend.  I agree it isn't something an individual recognizes in him/herself but I do see it as a point of peace instead of chasing some inflated dream or goal anymore. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>Is it real like cartoon characters?</p>

Cute.  It's the opposite of pretending you're somebody you're really not. 

 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:28am
In that case, most everyone I know is "self-actualized." The "pretending/posing" bit usually wears off in high school or late teens, IME. I'm thinking that the most content/at peace person I ever observed was the severely autistic daughter of a friend, who at the age of three, had all if her needs met and was blissfully happy and at peace as long as she could sit by the window and sift puzzle pieces through her fingers. Funny how her patents lay siege to that particular state of nirvana.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:29am

Happy birthday, Jamblessed!

If you are married, How many years did you wait- if any - to have children after getting married?

We waited a year to have children ~ which is a few months longer than the time we waited to get engaged and married combined!

Are there any things you miss doing before kids?  If so, what?

Yes, many things.  Obviously, I miss the freedom.  In a strange way, I miss dating!  I had a lot of fun.  And in a strange way, I fondly recall "all-nighters."  Not what you may be thinking.  I miss the rush and panic that came with staying up all night before a paper or finals in school.  And also when I had graduated and started working, I might stay up all night to finish a project, read a book cover to cover, 5 am bike ride to the deli for coffee and bagel to munch by the water. :)

Is your life now what you expected it would be 10 or 20 years ago? 

Pretty much.  I thought with marriage and children, I would still be working.  But this is lovely and probably allowed me to have one more child than I otherwise might have.

At what point do you self actualize?  Do you believe in it?

I had to look that up.  I did go thru a whole "the path to salvation" phase and studied Buddhism and also had my Somerset Maugham fetish.  But I don't think I could be better in tune with my self than I have always kinda been. 

What's on your agenda this week?

I'm finding this summer overwhelming already.  This week is more of the same, cooking, cleaning and mountains of laundry.  I anticipate having 1 to 3 more children (friends of my guys) almost everyday this week ~ sleepovers already scheduled, a water park, a pool function/bbq, the arcade, and anything to get them all away from the Wii and x-box.  DH will take off Friday so that always helps.  Things will improve *for me* when camp eventually starts. Smile

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:30am

bordwithyou wrote:
In that case, most everyone I know is "self-actualized." The "pretending/posing" bit usually wears off in high school or late teens, IME. I'm thinking that the most content/at peace person I ever observed was the severely autistic daughter of a friend, who at the age of three, had all if her needs met and was blissfully happy and at peace as long as she could sit by the window and sift puzzle pieces through her fingers. Funny how her patents lay siege to that particular state of nirvana.

What does that mean?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:34am

Family with autistic children strike me as incredibly at peace and blessed too, Good point. I have a really good friend whose autistic DS and my DS go to school together, She's had the time to write and publish a couple of related books and that boy is one of the most remarkable kids I've ever met. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:34am
It means that her parents used every possible means they could think of to make her interact with a world she was perfectly content to ignore, because at some point, the parental gods would no longer be able to, or be around to, fulfill her every need so that she could remain on that state of perfect contentment.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:37am

Wow, Thank you for that honest reflection about self actualization thardy. Cool is you!

And TY for the Happy Birthday.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 06-24-2013 - 9:38am

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>In that case, most everyone I know is "self-actualized." The "pretending/posing" bit usually wears off in high school or late teens, IME. I'm thinking that the most content/at peace person I ever observed was the severely autistic daughter of a friend, who at the age of three, had all if her needs met and was blissfully happy and at peace as long as she could sit by the window and sift puzzle pieces through her fingers. <strong>Funny how her patents lay siege to that particular state of nirvana.</strong></blockquote></p><p>What does that mean?</p>

A rock band? 

 


 


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