Mundane Monday

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Mundane Monday
548
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 9:22am

Welcome to a new week :)

1. Has spring "sprung" by you yet?

2. What are you wearing today?

3. Do you make a special menu for Easter (if you celebrate it)? 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:50pm
So they HAVE accommodated for her in the past? Was this for a huge gathering or just one on one dinner?
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:51pm
I am really not sure what "tree nuts" and in what food she is speaking about to tell you the truth Bord.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:53pm
There's a big difference between not liking a food and potentially dying if you eat it. I absolutely do accommodate my guests' deadly allergies. Having somebody die in the middle of the meal would spoil it for everyone, don't you think?
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:54pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
No backpedaling Littlemiss. I do think that if there is no person who has an allergy, everyone should not suffer though. Should they be aware and considerate, yes but IMO, if my child had an allergy that bad, I would bring my own food and if I had to, I would find something similiar that everyone else was eating without the harmful ingredients so they didn't feel left out. THAT is what I meant. Thanks.

It is easy to say "what you would do" when it's not your kid or your reality, Hazel. In reality, you have no idea what you would do until it is actually the reality you are living.

My daughter had an anaphylactic reaction to latex after a trip to the dentist. We had no idea she was even allergic to latex until she presented w/the anaphylaxis. Ever watch your kid almost die from anaphylactic shock? Because I have. When your kid is the kid who can't eat the pretty cake (or the pizza) at birthday parties, or what everyone else is eating at snack at school, when you fear every trip to the dentist, or doctor or hospital because latex almost killed her once...When you can honestly that say you've lived the special hell that is life with life threatening allergies, and you've watched your kid slide down the slippery slope that is anaphylactic shock, you can tell me "what you would do." 

Until you have lived it, you have no freaking clue.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:56pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
Littlemiss I am going by the perspective of someone cooking for many people at a holiday dinner. Just like if you don't like chicken and there are 20 other people there that will eat chicken, do you want the host to make you a separate meal because you don't like it? I know she said she brings something different for her that she can eat. I suggested to see if there recipes that the host does not eliminate tree nuts from that her dd could feel like she was eating the same thing as the others so she doesn't feel left out. I would never expect someone who was cooking for a crowd to cater to me or my child's allergies.

Comparing someone who doesn't like chicken to a child with an allergy that could make her throat close up is absurd.  You never suggested she look for similar things until you suggested she look for nut & butter recipes on Pinterest.  Then you beckpedaled to this other suggestion.  I know you can't admit you backpedaled.  You are also saying you would  not even give a thought to accommodating a child with a severe allergy.  That's sad.  If it was my family I would expect them to give a crap enough to omit tree nuts from food served, when we were there.  If they did not, it would be very telling to the relationship for my family/child.  There is no nut in any recipe that is so important that anyone consume it in any given meal.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:56pm
If I have 20 people for dinner and I KNOW that one of them does not like chicken, then I cook something other than chicken. If there are several people who dislike something and it is therefore difficult to find a main course, I cook 2 different things so everyone has something to eat. I also try to make several different substantial sides, when I have that many people. That way, if someone dislikes the mains, they can eat the sides. Dh does not eat chicken, so I do not serve it when he is home, and if one of my guests is a vegetarian, then the meal will be vegetarian and so on.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:57pm
DS went through a period of food aversion, b/w the ages of 4 and 5 and just last year. He'd throw up in the morning a lot and mid-afternoon - often after lunch. I kept a diary of it and tried to follow it back to his diet but doctors are very careful NOT to call reactions to food allergies unless you're willing to go through a huge battery of tests, The doctor also threw out possible celiac disease or early krohns and a friend of mine had to scare me with this horror story about a kid at her childrens' school who dropped dead on the football field that had a history of chrons, Nice, Sigh! DS is 10 now and he's still a picky eater but he's safe and thank God his aversions aren't deadly. ---------------------------------- Does this mean that you never had him tested for celiac or allergies? How often does he throw up and what are the food he is averse to?
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:58pm
If the host would like to make a separate dish for the person, then yes. Eliminate the trigger for that one person in everyone's dish, then no.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:59pm
"Having somebody die in the middle of the meal would spoil it for everyone, don't you think?" ---------- It does tend to put a damper on things, yes.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 1:59pm
Have you had her tested Regina for everything?

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