Mundane Monday

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Mundane Monday
548
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 9:22am

Welcome to a new week :)

1. Has spring "sprung" by you yet?

2. What are you wearing today?

3. Do you make a special menu for Easter (if you celebrate it)? 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:55pm

pumpkinangel wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">cruisingchick20111</em> wrote:</div>If the host would like to make a separate dish for the person, then yes. Eliminate the trigger for that one person in everyone's dish, then no.</blockquote></p><p>Why not?</p>

Because evidently having to eat a salad without tree nuts constitutes suffering for Cruise.  And no one should have to suffer in order to keep a five year old alive.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:55pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
For a salad, I would have made a separate one for the person BEFORE making the one with the nuts.

Regina has explained why it would still be dangerous to do so.  Are you not familiar with cross-contamination?

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:57pm
So ALL of your families do NOT know about the severity of your dd's allergies. Is that what you are saying Regina?
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:57pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
I don't get how she could "forget" though if you spend holidays with her and she KNOWS how allergic your child is. Especially if when you eat at other's homes, they accommodate her.

If someone comes to my house for dinner and I've accomodated their allergy, I don't make a huge deal.  "NOW I AM SERVING THE NUT FREE ENTREE."  "NOW WE WILL ALL BE EATING THE NUT FREE DESSERT."  I mean, my guess is that the SIL has been told that her niece has this allergy, but they don't make it out to be a HUGE deal at every single family gathering-- because it's not a big deal to not serve something you know will cause a life-threatening allergic reaction.  

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:57pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
No, I personally would probably ask the parent if I should make a separate dish similar to what everyone else was eating (if they did not insist on doing it first) but I would not eliminate things from everyone's dish to accommodate one person.

My guess is that the other guests wouldn't even know the offending dish had been eliminated. 

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:58pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
I don't get how she could "forget" though if you spend holidays with her and she KNOWS how allergic your child is. Especially if when you eat at other's homes, they accommodate her.

Are you going to come out and accuse me of lying or what, Hazel? I don't know how she forgot. What I know is that when I pointed it out, she told me she forgot. I don't know why you keep harping on this. But it does go to show that food allergy parents can not ever let their guards down. EVER.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:58pm

cruisingchick20111 wrote:
Sorry to hear that Littlemiss but what happens when her dd gets older and goes to friends homes and other places that might have these things? Should she expect everywhere she goes to accommodate her allergies? What happens when she gets a last minute invite to a friends for dinner and they already cooked with things she can't eat? Do you expect them to throw away the food and re-make it with items that she can eat?

IF the alternative was death....why on earth not?   Do you not know the meaning of a deathly allergy?

PumpkinAngel

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:59pm

lauren1063 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">cruisingchick20111</em> wrote:</div>No backpedaling Littlemiss. I do think that if there is no person who has an allergy, everyone should not suffer though. Should they be aware and considerate, yes but IMO,<strong> if my child had an allergy that bad, I would bring my own food</strong> and if I had to, I would find something similiar that everyone else was eating without the harmful ingredients so they didn't feel left out. THAT is what I meant. Thanks.</blockquote></p><p>Bringing one's own food does not solve the problem, though.  If I knew that one guest was allergic to a certain food then you're <a href="mailto:d@mn" rel="nofollow">d@mn</a> skippy I wouldn't serve something that contained that food.  All it takes is for one person to accidentally set their serving spoon on top of the "safe" food, and suddenly that food is unsafe.  That is not a risk that I'm willing to take with my guests. </p><p>I totally don't get the part about people suffering because a food isn't there.  It's just food.  There will be other food there.  What's to suffer from?</p>

My BFF in VA had to keep her coffee cups and spoons separate from the others at work; she's allergic to somethingorother in the artificial sweeteners that many people used.  And if she even got some of the dust from the package in her coffee it could send her into seizure.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-10-2011
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:59pm
That is surprising Geschigtal because she has made a HUGE deal out of it here, on a messageboard on several threads with NO food involved. I think if that was MY child, I would be making SURE there was no life-threatening food at the gathering I was going to and I would think they would know by know since she said they have been accommodating her for years. How do you "forget"?
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 03-25-2013 - 2:59pm

reginageorge2005 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">cruisingchick20111</em> wrote:</div>Have you had her tested Regina for everything?</blockquote> <blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">cruisingchick20111</em> wrote:</div>Have you had her tested Regina for everything?</blockquote></p><p>How do you think we found out about her allergies? ESP? Spidey sense? Of course we had her tested. For some reason, latex is not one of the things they test for. Her first dentist trip (initial exposure) was uneventful. Second trip (reaction) almost killed her. Now her dentist uses latex-free gloves on her. </p><p>She is under the care of a fabulous allergist. Who, when told the story of our Thanksgiving dinner w/nuts, actually commended me for my reaction to the tree nut salad. I quote, "I really wish I had more parents like you. Are you available to give lessons on advocacy?"</p><p>I'm not ever going to apologize for doing whatever it takes to keep my kid safe. And if that's seen as rude or bitchy, so be it. I'd rather be a bitch with a healthy kid than a "nice person" with a dead one.</p>

I don't see why this is an issue with some posters, parents advocate for the well being of their kids in all kinds of ways.  

Why should food get a pass?  

PumpkinAngel

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