Okay. . totally OT, but gonna ask anyway

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-25-2003
Okay. . totally OT, but gonna ask anyway
13
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 9:43am

I know this has NOTHING to do with SAH/WOH, but I don't participate on any of the other debate boards so I don't feel comfortable raising these questions elsewhere.


I'm sure by know you've all heard of the tragic and heroic death of Spc (now Cpl) Pat Tillman, the former Phoenix Cardinal football player who left the NFL and a 3+million dollar contract to join the Army.


I applaud Cpl Tillman for his service and am humbled by the sacrifice of his life for our country, but what I'm wondering is what message does the media frenzy over his tragic death say to the families of other soldiers who've made the same ultimate sacrifice. . .and are mere numbers to the media?


Are those soldiers less worthy because they weren't 'famous' before their service and death?


Are those soldiers assumed to have had nothing else to live for or other career options other than the Army, as opposed to Cpl Tillman who 'gave up so much'?


And please realize my questions are regarding the MEDIA frenzy regarding the tragedy, not Cpl Tillman, his service, or his sacrifice. . .those stand alone in tribute to patriotism and commitment to something outside oneself.

Virgo

Virgo
 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 9:46am

"Are those soldiers assumed to have had nothing else to live for or other career options other than the Army, as opposed to Cpl Tillman who 'gave up so much'?"


Yes.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-15-2003
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 10:14am
I couldn't agree more. We are in this state of "hero-worship" where one man's life IS viewed as better and more important than others. He was living the (what the media wants us to consider) the "ultimate dream". Fame and fortune, given up to serve his country. Your husband, my brother...if they lost their lives in the war, it would mean nothing to the world at large because they were just "regular people" before they served.

What's the quote? A life out of the spotlight is not worth living? We are teaching the kids (through reality tv and endless media sources) that they are not special or significant if they are not famous for their requisite 15 minutes.

It's so sad.

I will take it one step further.... what about Jessica Lynch? Or Dru Shodin? Were their cases only made popular because they were (are) cute girls? What was so special about their cases otherwise?

Meldi

Meldi
Avatar for my2bestboys
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 10:23am

Hey, today I agree with you ;-)


 

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-2003
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 12:28pm

Did you see the audacity of

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 2:13pm

I was just reading the Washington Post with my lunch, and came upon three full pages of pictures of all service men and women who have died in Iraq in the last two months.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-2003
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 2:45pm
See, we need to know these faces, these names. Why do people think these tributes are anti-war propaganda? If a plane falls, immediately we see those faces in every magazine with a tribute to them. Why must the soldiers not get the same recognition for fear that people will not want to support the war anymore?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 3:09pm

I agree.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-11-2003
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 3:48pm

It's ironic, really,

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-31-2003
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 4:47pm
Not to mention Jimmy Stewart, Clark Gable, Ted Williams, Joe Louis, et al in WW2. It has always been a big deal when a celebrity enters the military, especially wealthy leading actors and sports stars who go into combat. Tillman was very unusual in our era, though, which is why he attracted so much attention. This article, written last year, discusses how much has changed in that respect since WW2: http://www.newhouse.com/archive/melendez041603.html

What I find more interesting is the big fracas over the casket photograph. I'm old enough to remember a time when it was quite common to see flag-draped caskets being taken off cargo planes, it was sobering, too. I don't think it's good to suppress those photographs.

Of course, just lately, I seem to be hearing a faint chorus of "Fortunate Son" playing in the back of my mind rather often. Politics, clothes, gas prices and all, it is beginning to look a lot like 1973.

Avatar for taylormomma
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-23-2003
Fri, 04-30-2004 - 6:44pm

I don't think it has anything to do with a value judgement. It's simply that when someone is in the public eye, more people "know" them than the average citizen, so there's more people to tell.


And sometimes, people can become a symbol for something larger, or for others in a similar situation.

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