Oprah and Education?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2010
Oprah and Education?
112
Fri, 09-24-2010 - 5:10pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-10-2009
Fri, 09-24-2010 - 5:26pm

My initial thoughts: in short bursts:



<
"That's a heartbreaking moment," Oprah says.

Nakia says she tried to find the right words to help Bianca understand the situation. "I told her: 'You did graduate. You just weren't a part of the ceremony. You mattered just as much as anyone else did,'" Nakia says.>>



Really? Really?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Fri, 09-24-2010 - 5:58pm

I did not see Oprah, but the news have been talking about this movie coming out. Obviously I haven't seen it--one thing they did say is that this movie is all about the state of our schools etc, but not one teacher (I thought he said principal and/or student too, but not sure) in a public school is interviewed.

So . . . seems like it will be private & charter schools trash talking the pubic schools? (yes to borrow the phrase from the above thread).

Ok and on tracking . . . how else are they to determine which student can handle which classes? My dd is on a gifted track and took pre-algebra in 6th grade (and it was very difficult for her). My younger dd is more of an average student and there is no way she could have done pre-algebra this year. How else should the school decide which student gets which classes?

Also my dh (way back in the 70's) was on a lower track than he should have been and a teacher noticed and said, why are you in these classes and fixed it and put him in a higher track. So yes it would have been really bad if he had stayed on the lower track, but again that doesn't mean you will always stay there.

And I'm against tenure for teachers in elementary, middle & high school.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Fri, 09-24-2010 - 6:47pm

one link took a while to upload, 13 pgs of story i may catch up with another time..i lost interest at kids being left behind at failing school, anyway, sigh.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Sat, 09-25-2010 - 12:28am

The entire article could have been on 1-2 pages if it weren't for the ads, Oprah information, and comments on each page. I almost gave up reading it because of having to click to the next page ever 30 seconds or so. And I was struck by the lack of input from real teachers with classroom experience.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Sat, 09-25-2010 - 3:13am
Thanks. I parked my ditto with the author of the second link.

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Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 09-25-2010 - 3:16am

The article is a hodge-podge of superficial and random thoughts. Does Oprah get paid to push certain lines, like the superiority of charter schools or the abolition of teachers' unions? (serious question)

Yes, American education is slipping, and has been slipping for quite some time. The reasons for that are most likely quite complicated and defy easy solutions.

Yes, this is a problem when you are trying to run a highly technological, industrialized society.

My own impression is that Americans first of all tend to get overly excited by new-fangled ideas, like, for example, charter schools, Whole Language, NCLB or TERC. There seems to be a stampede tendency in American education, which means that by the time somebody figures out that an idea was actually really bad and puts on the breaks, that idea has already been widely adopted and implemented as gospel all over the place. The decentralization of US education aids this tendency.

That way the bad ideas become cumulative, in the sense that you end up with a whole bunch of teachers who do not know grammar, for example, or math or whatever, because they came of age during one of the misguided stampedes. As a result they can't teach these things to their own students and meanwhile some other stampede is destroying some other aspect of the process.

Another problem is that there is too much emphasis on everyone graduating HS and going to college. It is unrealistic to send everyone off to college, and it should not be "failure" if you don't. It would make more sense (as some districts are beginning to do) to offer genuine alternatives and at the same time deal with the consequences of mass education for those at the top of the scale. This means intelligently designed vocational programs and the option for academically inclined kids to take classes at the local CC while still in HS.

Concerning the tenured teachers, I really can't get too excited about that and I think it is a giant red herring. Whatever problems there are with teachers are not in their tenure, IMHO.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
– George Orwell






Edited 9/25/2010 11:55 am ET by rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Sat, 09-25-2010 - 9:07am
Oh jeeze way to much advertsiment and mubble jumble ...it was difficult to
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Sat, 09-25-2010 - 11:21am

"Another problem is that there is too much emphasis on everyone graduating HS and going to college. It is unrealistic to send everyone off to college, and it should not be "failure" if you don't. It would make more sense (as some districts are beginning to do) to offer genuine alternatives and at the same time deal with the consequences of mass education for those at the top of the scale. This means intelligently designed vocational programs and the option for academically inclined kids to take classes at the local CC while still in HS."

I agree. And the results is that when/if I ever retire, there is no one to replace me.

Chris

edited to correct a typo.






Edited 9/25/2010 11:22 am ET by sewchris703

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2010
Sat, 09-25-2010 - 11:26am
Yes.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sat, 09-25-2010 - 12:56pm
There was an article in the local paper a couple of years ago about the lack of qualified seamstresses. One couple's solution to the problem was to recruit them from Mexico. They worked with a trade school down there and then helped the graduating students get their green cards.

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