Oprah and Education?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2010
Oprah and Education?
112
Fri, 09-24-2010 - 5:10pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 8:37am

My dh can speak these languages i know enough to communicate the basics. They can write some spanish, portuguese much more difficult for them. As I said, my children were raised with the culture and language. In my dh's career/business we have generations of family members who come to the states and work for us on a work visa, some have/will stay with us or live in our rental properties. Some have eventually became citizens, they are all like "family." If my children were raised near my mother and her family they would understand more Norweigian, < i can speak, but im rusty> my mother and her sisters would make sure of that...;)

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 8:37am

Sorry double post.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 9:02am
I love this post. This is one of the reasons my mom quit teaching. She really liked teaching the kids. But once they started mainstreaming kids with learning and behavior problems she had a lot of trouble. When you have a class of 20 first graders, 5 of whom have learning and/or behavior problems, most of them low income, with no aide, it's extremely hard to make sure everyone is learning. Add in the teacher politics and the paperwork, etc. and it's overwhelming.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 9:06am
I agree that it is way to hard to fire bad teachers, but tenure does have its purposes. Imagine if you were a science teacher in Kansas who wants to teach science instead of creationism. A tenured teacher would probably be more free to do that than one who is not.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2010
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 9:50am

I agree with you and then add to that budget cuts in the schools, lack of supplies and so forth and those problems just continue to grow.



iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 11:05am
I am going to take a break from the boards. I don't have the time to post a adequate response and I need to allow my emotions to quite down. This post makes very very upset.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 1:08pm
I know I understand it has it's purpose. Would that teacher be able to teach that anyway, if the school has a curriculum that does not include evolution?

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2010
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 1:27pm

As far as NCLB, not being able to speak English IS a problem.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 1:58pm

I do understand that the situation you describe can be difficult for the teacher. I thought there was some allowance in NCLB for ESL students, but I could easily be wrong about that.

As for the rest, you make a lot of assumptions, assumptions that many people make and that I used to make myself, I hate to say.

Just because someone has been in-country for 10 years and still can't speak the local language well (or seemingly at all) does not mean that the person does not want to or hasn't tried.

When you are young, eager and unattached, it is not that hard to learn a new language. Once you are older and have pressing responsibilities it becomes a lot harder, please believe me. I have lived both experiences, since I have been an immigrant twice.

Lastly, even if the parents do not speak the local language and cannot participate in the school meetings etc, that in itself would not prevent their kids from learning the language and doing well in school. The real problem is that the parents are poor, uneducated etc, exactly the same problem you typically get with under-performing native-speaker kids.

Kids tend to learn a new language quickly and to the level of their native language. This means that if a kid has Spanish as his native language, as long as he speaks Spanish at a good level for his age, he will learn the next language well too. The problem with non-native speaker kids from poor and uneducated homes is usually that their native language is not well developed. It is not that their native language is a foreign one. Again, this is typically the problem that kids from under-privileged native-speaker homes have as well. So, the problem is one of poorly developed language, period. At age 5, it is almost irrelevant what that specific language is.


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Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
– George Orwell
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 2:50pm
In my state every public school, that iam familiar with has a ese dept certified special ed teachers and paras to go with children who need who need them. Which means if you are not trained and licensed in special ed you cannot have a child mainstreamed in your classroom. When the boys went to charter they had just opened the school and they had no ESE dept and paras to accompany special needs kids, this changed within 2 years b/c of the concerns related to the needs of the children with special needs.
I volunteered every friday to do "friday folders" I can honestly say, i had not heard one teachers complain about having special needs kids in her classroom, the complete opposite their concerns were pointed to the needs if the child/ren b/c they were unable to give the children what they needed.

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