Parent involvement in school

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Parent involvement in school
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Fri, 03-21-2014 - 2:59am

Interesting new study looks at how useful parental involvement actually is: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/04/and-dont-help-your-kids-with-their-homework/358636/

A few excerpts:

"Do you review your daughter’s homework every night? Robinson and Harris’s data, published in The Broken Compass: Parental Involvement With Children’s Education, show that this won’t help her score higher on standardized tests. Once kids enter middle school, parental help with homework can actually bring test scores down, "

[...]

"they did find a handful of habits that make a difference, such as reading aloud to young kids (fewer than half of whom are read to daily) and talking with teenagers about college plans."

[...]

"What’s more, although conventional wisdom holds that poor children do badly in school because their parents don’t care about education, the opposite is true. Across race, class, and education level, the vast majority of American parents report that they speak with their kids about the importance of good grades and hope that they will attend college. Asian American kids may perform inordinately well on tests, for example, but their parents are not much more involved at school than Hispanic parents are—not surprising, given that both groups experience language barriers."

[...]

"Instead, students described mothers and fathers who set high expectations and then stepped back. “These kids made it!,” Robinson told me. “You’d expect they’d have the type of parental involvement we’re promoting at the national level. But they hardly had any of that. It really blew me away.”"

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 8:01am

Hah! I was just coming here armed with the link to this exact article.

Annette Lareau's research pushed me in the direction of sociology. She exposed the core differences between child-rearing across socioeconomic statuses. Blue collar parents are simply more likely to teach their children to survive as blue collar help, whereas white collar workers tend to instill the kinds of skills that they feel that their children will need to succeed, like problem-solving, independent thinking, etc.

I think that one of the best things that I did for my kids was to allow them to learn how to manage their own homework during elementary school. They suffered mild consequences for missing homework assignments from time to time, but ultimately they learned how to manage their time. I refuse to micromanage my children. Despite not having asked about their homework in years, they've both earned excellent grades and have great test scores. I don't know if this strategy would be universally successful, however. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 8:07am
Goes to show that parenting can't be proven by scientific studies, there are too many other variables. I am reminded of the principal that told a class they were not special, Wouldn't it be interesting to hear their perspectives now as college seniors or/and college graduates, Likewise kids that get in and excel despite poor home environments. I am involved in my kids school and with families that are facing the same challenges my kid does, It's warm and humbling to hear other stories but that's about the extent of it, I don't/can't use a study to determine my own parenting style and you know what, teachers, social workers, administrators aren't cracking the whip and telling parents how to parent either, That's not their job.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-25-2013
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 8:49am

I can see how this would be true. Parents who set the expectations high and then step back allow their children to learn and experience every aspect of success, including failure and disappointment, are teaching their children a critical element for a good life-how to problem solve. Parents who step in and help too often teach their children to depend on others when things get tough.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 8:52am

I grew up in a blue collar world. I always got the feeling that college was for those other people, not for us.  I got good grades and I remember a few mentionings when younger of if she goes to college but that is as far as it got.  I was the first generation in my family where graduating from high school was common so that in itself was seen as a major accomplishment.  Going to college afterwards  was never seen as the next step.  In fact I only remember one cousin, in my generation but a few years younger ,that did so.  I do have other relatives that attended college  but that was a few years after graduating, not right after college.  Because of that I did not know the steps in going to college, did not know about Sats, etc.  The school I attended was of no help there.  There was no guidance on what was needed, I guess the feeling was most of us were not going to college anyway and the ones that were would find out what they needed to know.

Our DDs also grew up in a blue collar world.  Some differences, we always talked about when you go to college not if.  Our kids  saw it as the next step after high school.  The schools they attended were also of that midset so gave the information that  was needed to both the kids and the parents.  A big event every year is College Night where colleges from locally and all over the country come so kids can see what it out there.  Truthfully I think the best thing we did in leading our children to go to college was in retiring where we did. Where a college  education  was looked on as the next step so the schools prepared you for that.  Going to a high school where attending college is the norm rather than the rarity is a possive influenece. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 8:57am

It never occurred to me to review my kids' homework other than to ask if they had any. I really had nothing to bring to the table, because my own study habits were always dismal. (I was shocked when I got to my first semester of college and made a C in an English class). I figured my kids needed to sort this out on their own and develop good habits in elementary school, and they did.

I did volunteer at the school, although I never regarded it as helping my kids specifically, but helping the community in general.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 9:33am

jamblessedthree wrote:
Goes to show that parenting can't be proven by scientific studies, there are too many other variables. I am reminded of the principal that told a class they were not special, Wouldn't it be interesting to hear their perspectives now as college seniors or/and college graduates, Likewise kids that get in and excel despite poor home environments. I am involved in my kids school and with families that are facing the same challenges my kid does, It's warm and humbling to hear other stories but that's about the extent of it, I don't/can't use a study to determine my own parenting style and you know what, teachers, social workers, administrators aren't cracking the whip and telling parents how to parent either, That's not their job.

Why am I not surprised that you missed the point entirely? This is not a study to "prove parenting", but a study to measure outcomes and determine what influenced those outcomes as a general pattern. It found that micromanaging children's studies held often  back achievement and setting expections and stepping aside helped achievement. There are, of course, exceptions but the study proved that the general pattern exists, whether you want to believe it or not.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 12:04pm
Lol chestnut, smh.

 


 


Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 12:55pm
"Lol chestnut, smh." ------ Shaking your head? Why?
Avatar for savcal2011
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Registered: 10-06-2010
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 7:05pm

I was a lot more involved regarding my children's school when they were younger. I volunteered in the classroom occasionally, was involved in PTA etc. that dwindled over time as my children's abilities increased and their passions focused. Now I reserve my involvement for the things they're heavily invested in - in areas where the volunteer pool is smaller, where I can make a bigger impact, and where my time interacts wight that of my kids. I help with homework occasionally, but only when either asked or when there is an obvious need. I've been less supervisory and Naggy this year than ever with The Boy and his grades, behavior and social life are the best they've ever been. Causal or corollary? I dunno. Some of both maybe.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Sat, 03-22-2014 - 7:46pm

rollmops2009 wrote:
"Lol chestnut, smh." ------ Shaking your head? Why?

Because she can't counter my post with a reasoned response?

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