Paying for College

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Paying for College
265
Mon, 04-07-2014 - 3:18am

Since the subject has been debated here often enough, this article may be of interest to some:

"A lot of Internet ink has been spilled over how lazy and entitled Millennials are, but when it comes to paying for a college education, work ethic isn't the limiting factor. The economic cards are stacked such that today’s average college student, without support from financial aid and family resources, would need to complete 48 hours of minimum-wage work a week to pay for his courses—a feat that would require superhuman endurance, or maybe a time machine."

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/04/the-myth-of-working-your-way-through-college/359735/?google_editors_picks=true

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Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 7:57am

Uhm, Money wasn't just floating around, Lol but the government did spend more and that's been cut back, I wonder why.  Of course my anecdotal story is just that - nor am I claiming abuse is the only reason for high college costs - but if there is a pattern of people using government student aid for the wrong reasons then guess what, schools themselves have to/are making up the difference in higher costs. 

There are many intersting articles about the rise of college tuition, This discussion is a good one:

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424127887324549004579068992834736138

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 8:09am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;jamblessedthree&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;If by cohort you mean molly how is she less savvy than you? She's not expressed lack of knowledge or experience about the college process. I'm actually surprised, given your experiences and education, that you'd hire a private consultant, What in return did you get for that? Perhaps there is something someone less schooled could learn from you, And the expense for it could be raised via charity or fund raiser.&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;. Blacksndwhitemollly has nothing to do with this.  I was speaking of the percentage of first-generation or otherwise disadvantaged students iamong the many hundreds that a high school counselor is responsible for.  If there are just a few students among them who require significant help in negotiating the college selection and admissions process, that's manageable.  If there are a significant number, that could be a problem.  I have no clue why you jumped to the conclusion I had hired a college admissions counselor.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>That's good.  So the college process is a problem that starts at the high school level, What do you do about?  </p>
.  I'm not sure what you are asking, but at the very least I would expect that a counselor would sit down with each kid in the freshman year and talk about post-secondary dreams and aspirations, and make sure that the kid is aware of various options and the path to getting there.  The initial conversation should begin to identify the talented kids who might need extra help on the path to university or college.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 8:14am
Both of my kids have gotten introduced to a high school counselor in 9th grade as she has prepared (and has had to modify b/c of one daughter's special needs) schedules at this grade, They are pretty much the go to for schedules and for college planning down the road but I'm not so convinced they have the time for college planning the way they used to anymore.

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 10:56am

If I owned a business where customers were lining up around the corner, even after I raised prices, why would I keep them same or lower them?

Demand is increasing. This is runaway pricing. The government needs to fund more to state universities, not less. The future health of our country's economy and national security is at stake. (Political aside:) Perhaps we should focus more on education, and less on military spending. I'll give you that a strong military is essential to protect our economic interests, but if those interests continue to wane with our lack of competitiveness and growing inequality, what will be left to protect?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 11:00am

I am feeling suddenly extra grateful for the intense college counseling that my children are getting their schools. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 11:28am

In Texas there is a cap on tuition so tuition itself for a state college is very reasonalble but that cap does not carry over to other fees and expences so that is where the colleges get you.    Room and board at the private college DD1 and DD2 attended was half of what it was at  many state universities.  The cost of a parking pass at the state college that DD3 attended was I think 10 times what it was where her sisters attended. 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 12:42pm

emptynester2009 wrote:
<p>In Texas there is a cap on tuition so tuition itself for a state college is very reasonalble but that cap does not carry over to other fees and expences so that is where the colleges get you.    Room and board at the private college DD1 and DD2 attended was half of what it was at  many state universities.  The cost of a parking pass at the state college that DD3 attended was I think 10 times what it was where her sisters attended. </p>

Texas has a great reputation insofar as in state tuition.  I'd often hear tuitions compared to and ranked lower in cost than many/most private primary schools. 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 10:28pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
My daughter and I were just talking about college last night, Eek, She told me she doesn't want to stay here and we'll probably explore a college or two next year in her junior year then look at a couple more before she decides for sure, It's an exciting time, I think getting to talk to somebody and seeing a campus in person is going to be very beneficial for her, I hear more and more how high school counselors aren't really doing their jobs in helping kids prepare for college and all the way they used to.

Has she not ever seen a college campus yet?  Ime, it is very common for kids of all ages to have been on campus for a variety of things from athletic to academic to summer experiences, overnight visits as well.  Outside of the college counselor sending documents to colleges, we haven't really used the school counselor and I don't anticpate using them for my younger child either, they start too late, imo.

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 10:31pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;jamblessedthree&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;If by cohort you mean molly how is she less savvy than you? She's not expressed lack of knowledge or experience about the college process. I'm actually surprised, given your experiences and education, that you'd hire a private consultant, What in return did you get for that? Perhaps there is something someone less schooled could learn from you, And the expense for it could be raised via charity or fund raiser.&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;. Blacksndwhitemollly has nothing to do with this.  I was speaking of the percentage of first-generation or otherwise disadvantaged students iamong the many hundreds that a high school counselor is responsible for.  If there are just a few students among them who require significant help in negotiating the college selection and admissions process, that's manageable.  If there are a significant number, that could be a problem.  I have no clue why you jumped to the conclusion I had hired a college admissions counselor.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>That's good.  So the college process is a problem that starts at the high school level, What do you do about?  </p>

I don't know why you are calling it a problem but it is a question that starts at the high school level, if not before.  The college process can start at any time for someone, but I think for high school students the best time to start is freshman year and do a little bit more each year. 

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 12-22-2013
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 10:57pm

So what is the point to start seeing colleges when kids are freshmen when they could possibly and do drop out of the school after the first year? 

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