Paying for College

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Paying for College
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Mon, 04-07-2014 - 3:18am

Since the subject has been debated here often enough, this article may be of interest to some:

"A lot of Internet ink has been spilled over how lazy and entitled Millennials are, but when it comes to paying for a college education, work ethic isn't the limiting factor. The economic cards are stacked such that today’s average college student, without support from financial aid and family resources, would need to complete 48 hours of minimum-wage work a week to pay for his courses—a feat that would require superhuman endurance, or maybe a time machine."

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/04/the-myth-of-working-your-way-through-college/359735/?google_editors_picks=true

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Registered: 12-22-2013
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 11:05pm

IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. 

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Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 11:35pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p>IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. </p>
blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p>IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. </p>
.  Students do not have to start visiting colleges, but certainly the first year of high school is not too early to start making sure that they understand the various options open to them and what it takes to meet certain goals.  Many students do not know much about the different kinds of schools out there, and which might be better for them.  They are planning out coursework for the next four years I their freshman year of high school, and knowing that some universities and certain majors have certain expectations is a good thing.  There are also summer programs and things they can do to get acquainted with university opportunities as early as the summer after freshman year of high school if they qualify.

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Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 04-13-2014 - 11:40pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p>So what is the point to start seeing colleges when kids are freshmen when they could possibly and do drop out of the school after the first year? </p>
p. It gives them the experience if different kinds of colleges and universities so they can begin to ask questions such as, "Do I want to go to a major research university or a small liberal arts school?"  "Is maybe a trade school what I am looking for?" "Do I want to try for a place in one of the military academies?"  If they don't know their options, their dreams ae likely to be limited.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 5:38am

bordwithyou wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">blackandwhitemolly</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote> <blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">blackandwhitemolly</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote>.  Students do not have to start visiting colleges, but certainly the first year of high school is not too early to start making sure that they understand the various options open to them and what it takes to meet certain goals.  Many students do not know much about the different kinds of schools out there, and which might be better for them.  They are planning out coursework for the next four years I their freshman year of high school, and knowing that some universities and certain majors have certain expectations is a good thing.  There are also summer programs and things they can do to get acquainted with university opportunities as early as the summer after freshman year of high school if they qualify.</p>

My kids, knock wood, know that college is a natural progression after high school, We've spoken about college long before their 9th grade year, The notion otherwise is funny, Lol.  Of course there are programs at colleges as are there sport camps there too, I enrolled DS in a soccer camp at Colgate one year, Now that was fun.  Molly is right, Kids don't technically start visiting campuses until later on when they are closer to applying to colleges, YMMV. 

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 5:51am
Really good point molly, What is the % of college drop outs and why? Maybe they learned early that life is their oyster and all about them.

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 5:59am

bordwithyou wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">blackandwhitemolly</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;So what is the point to start seeing colleges when kids are freshmen when they could possibly and do drop out of the school after the first year? &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote>p. It gives them the experience if different kinds of colleges and universities so they can begin to ask questions such as, "Do I want to go to a major research university or a small liberal arts school?"  "Is maybe a trade school what I am looking for?" "Do I want to try for a place in one of the military academies?"  If they don't know their options, their dreams ae likely to be limited.</p>

I'd have to ask my sister when her son first considered West Point an option for college but it wasn't your typcal college application process. 

 

 

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Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 6:26am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;blackandwhitemolly&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt; &lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;blackandwhitemolly&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;.  Students do not have to start visiting colleges, but certainly the first year of high school is not too early to start making sure that they understand the various options open to them and what it takes to meet certain goals.  Many students do not know much about the different kinds of schools out there, and which might be better for them.  They are planning out coursework for the next four years I their freshman year of high school, and knowing that some universities and certain majors have certain expectations is a good thing.  There are also summer programs and things they can do to get acquainted with university opportunities as early as the summer after freshman year of high school if they qualify.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>My kids, knock wood, know that college is a natural progression after high school, We've spoken about college long before their 9th grade year, The notion otherwise is funny, Lol.  Of course there are programs at colleges as are there sport camps there too, I enrolled DS in a soccer camp at Colgate one year, Now that was fun.  Molly is right, Kids don't technically start visiting campuses until later on when they are closer to applying to colleges, YMMV. </p>
. That is nice about your children but I thought we were speaking of children whose parents might not be capable of  giving them the expectation that college is the natural progression from high school.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 6:36am

I thought we were speaking of children whose parents might not be capable of  giving them the expectation that college is the natural progression from high school.

So what is your point..  Keep those parents you call not savvy where they are?  How do you empower parents to plant that seed early themselves?  It's not the high school counselor that should be entirely shamed like you said earlier either... 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 6:36am

jamblessedthree wrote:
Really good point molly, What is the % of college drop outs and why? Maybe they learned early that life is their oyster and all about them.
. The national freshman retention rate is around 67%.  It is highest at highly selective colleges such as Ivy League schools, where it is over 95%.  It is lowest at open and liberal admissions policy colleges, which suggests that it is statistically not the highly-privileged youth who are most vulnerable to not returning at all or taking a break after their freshman year.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 6:55am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><em>I thought we were speaking of children whose parents might not be capable of  giving them the expectation that college is the natural progression from high school.</em></p><p>So what is your point..  Keep those parents you call not savvy where they are?  How do you empower parents to plant that seed early themselves?  It's not the high school counselor that should be entirely shamed like you said earlier either...  </p>
. I did not "shame" high school counselors.  I pointed out that it is difficult for counts lies to identify talented students who need extra suppirt when they are in charge of hundreds of students.  No one can go back in time when a child is fourteen or fifteen and empower the parents to do something earlier.

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