Paying for College

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Paying for College
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Mon, 04-07-2014 - 3:18am

Since the subject has been debated here often enough, this article may be of interest to some:

"A lot of Internet ink has been spilled over how lazy and entitled Millennials are, but when it comes to paying for a college education, work ethic isn't the limiting factor. The economic cards are stacked such that today’s average college student, without support from financial aid and family resources, would need to complete 48 hours of minimum-wage work a week to pay for his courses—a feat that would require superhuman endurance, or maybe a time machine."

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/04/the-myth-of-working-your-way-through-college/359735/?google_editors_picks=true

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Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 10:43am

just_another_marla wrote:
<p>Talking about college in general and having the ability to explain different types of schools, majors, and living arrangements are two different things. I know high school students whose parents may do the former, but don't have the knowledge to explain the latter. I was in this camp as a high school student. My parents knew very little about college, so while they encouraged me to go, I never knew that I had any other options other than what I'd picked up myself (which was very little.) </p>

Or you could pay a private consultant.  According to bordwithyou and rollmops, Many parents use them. 

 

 

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 10:52am

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p>So what is the point to start seeing colleges when kids are freshmen when they could possibly and do drop out of the school after the first year? </p>

I don't think anyone said that was a specific point....

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 10:56am

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p>IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. </p>

Most kids I know have been on multiple college campuses way before high school for a variety of things.  They do more formal visits as they get older and figure out what they want to study but it's pretty common to visit colleges at any age, ime.

You are contradicting your lies there, how can I be pressuring my kid into a decision young and be having a hard time with my child going to college?   I'm also curious as to why you believe going to a college campus = pressuring into making a decision?

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 10:57am

bordwithyou wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">blackandwhitemolly</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;So what is the point to start seeing colleges when kids are freshmen when they could possibly and do drop out of the school after the first year? &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote>p. It gives them the experience if different kinds of colleges and universities so they can begin to ask questions such as, "Do I want to go to a major research university or a small liberal arts school?"  "Is maybe a trade school what I am looking for?" "Do I want to try for a place in one of the military academies?"  If they don't know their options, their dreams ae likely to be limited.</p>

Exactly, there are so many options out there.

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 10:58am

jamblessedthree wrote:
You make it sound like age 14 or 15 is too late to plant a seed about schooling after high school bordwithyou, What about that age is less influential than early ages? My experiences in talking to my children from an early age is just my experience, I can't imagine shutting off a kid at 14 or 15 b/c you didn't talk about it sooner.
. Neither can I, which is why I advocate that schools provide extra support for talented students whose parents, for whatever reason, have not shown them the possibilities that might await them.  You have pointed out how your daughter was inspired at an early age by a visit to a college drama production.  That kind of support is beneficial for kids, and not all kids have it.  That's where good counseling can make a world of difference.

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 10:58am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;blackandwhitemolly&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt; &lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;blackandwhitemolly&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;.  Students do not have to start visiting colleges, but certainly the first year of high school is not too early to start making sure that they understand the various options open to them and what it takes to meet certain goals.  Many students do not know much about the different kinds of schools out there, and which might be better for them.  They are planning out coursework for the next four years I their freshman year of high school, and knowing that some universities and certain majors have certain expectations is a good thing.  There are also summer programs and things they can do to get acquainted with university opportunities as early as the summer after freshman year of high school if they qualify.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>My kids, knock wood, know that college is a natural progression after high school, We've spoken about college long before their 9th grade year, The notion otherwise is funny, Lol.  Of course there are programs at colleges as are there sport camps there too, I enrolled DS in a soccer camp at Colgate one year, Now that was fun.  Molly is right, Kids don't technically start visiting campuses until later on when they are closer to applying to colleges, YMMV. </p>

It is funny since I didn't say anything about talking about college, I specifically asked if she had been on a college campus before, so I guess this is your passive agressive way of answering that yes, she has been on a college campus before?  Kids can visit college campuses at any age, many have different tours for different ages.

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 10:59am

jamblessedthree wrote:
Really good point molly, What is the % of college drop outs and why? Maybe they learned early that life is their oyster and all about them.

That seems like an illogical conclusion, do you have any facts or are just just personally attacking someone?

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 11:01am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">just_another_marla</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;<strong>Talking about college in general and having the ability to explain different types of schools, majors, and living arrangements are two different things. I know high school students whose parents may do the former, but don't have the knowledge to explain the latter</strong>. I was in this camp as a high school student. My parents knew very little about college, so while they encouraged me to go, I never knew that I had any other options other than what I'd picked up myself (which was very little.) &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>Or you could pay a private consultant.  According to bordwithyou and rollmops, Many parents use them.  </p>
. Children whose parents can not or will not provide the support and inspiration most kids need will likely not be in a position to understand how a consultant can help, nor be in a position to pay said consultant.

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 11:04am

savcal2011 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">pumpkinangel</em> wrote:</div>&lt;pHas she not ever seen a college campus yet?  Ime, it is very common for kids of all ages to have been on campus for a variety of things from athletic to academic to summer experiences, overnight visits as well.  Outside of the college counselor sending documents to colleges, we haven't really used the school counselor and I don't anticpate using them for my younger child either, they start too late, imo.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>That's one of the nice things about living in a college town and working for the University. Both my kids have a very good idea of what OSU is all about, what it's like, etc.  Having done concurrent enrollment this semester furthered that knowledge for The Girl.  She knew pretty early on that she didn't want to go to school here.  We didn't even do an official college visit or tour or even do an official application here. </p>

We are lucky as well to have a number of colleges in the area and that my kids have been exposed to a number of different type of colleges as they have grown up, this gives them a good idea of the type, size and location of colleges that they are interested.  There are a lot of colleges out there and neither dh or I wanted to limit them just based on what is around where we are living so we have specifically shown them different types of colleges.  More formal tours for the oldest started the summer before his junior year and that's when we will start with the youngest.

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Mon, 04-14-2014 - 11:07am

savcal2011 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">blackandwhitemolly</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;IME, kids go visit colleges closer to graduation. Many dont even know what they want to study until jr. or sr. year. There is no need to pressure them into making a decision that young. Wonder why you are having such a hard time with your child going to college. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>IME, the decision isn't made that young ... but the gathering of the information and experiences that will be used to make that decision in a few years starts that young. </p>

Exactly.

PumpkinAngel

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