Picturing Hunger in America

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Picturing Hunger in America
438
Sat, 02-22-2014 - 9:08am

Warning: these images may shatter your firmly-formed stereotypical ideas about those who struggle in America.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/breaking-stereotypes-women-use-cameras-aim-at-hunger/

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Wed, 02-26-2014 - 7:46pm

Jams wrote: "I'll give that generalization all the credit it deserves, smh.  I know somebody whose depression got changed to a pre-existing condition and I'm not even a fan of prescribed anti-depressents but those pills cost her more now.  I know people really affected by obamacare, I thought you did by what you wrote."

So here is Paul Krugman's response to your anectdotal data that Obamacare is screwing the the unfortunate (BTW Krugman is not a just blogger, he's a Nobel Prize winning economist who teaches at Princeton):

So here’s what you need to understand. The Affordable Care Act isn’t magic — it produces losers as well as winners. But it’s not black magic either, turning everyone into a loser. What the Act does is in effect to increase the burden on fortunate people — the healthy and wealthy — to lift some burdens on the less fortunate: people with chronic illnesses or other preexisting conditions, low-income workers.

Suppose, then, that someone comes to you with an anecdote about a cancer patient, or just an older person in poor health, and tells you that this person is about to lose the care she needs, or face a huge increase in expenses, under Obamacare. Well, it’s almost certainly not true — people like that are overwhelmingly beneficiaries of health reform, thanks to community rating, which means that they can’t be discriminated against because of their condition.

Here's the link but you may need a paid subscription to see it.

http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/26/a-general-theory-of-obamacare-fiction/

Jams, feel free to produce factual example  ACA unfortunates. Depression as a pre-existing condition is not an example, because pre-existing conditions are covered under ACA.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Wed, 02-26-2014 - 7:58am
Larger quantities don't save me $$, it is just more convenient which I suppose is a savings in itself, Lol.

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Wed, 02-26-2014 - 7:48am

We dealt with Express Scripts for a lot of years and Prime Mail for the last couple.   I have found mail order to always be cheaper,  often three months worth for about the same cost as one month through the pharmacy.  Keeping track of re-ordering has never been a problem they always e-mail me with plenty of tme to order.  Usually it only takes 4-5 days to get an order if it is done by fax or on line a few days longer if I mail it in. 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Wed, 02-26-2014 - 5:51am

Express scripts are required in my plan, not optional. It's is really inconvenient if we don't keep up and order several weeks before we run out. Just another thing to track.

I bet.  Express scripts does ship in larger quantities than what I can pick up at a time at my local pharmacy but I'd rather deal with my local pharmacy. 

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Wed, 02-26-2014 - 5:40am

emptynester2009 wrote:
<p>My insurance does not require mail order but they do encourage it (cost being one way).   We use mail order for long term ongoing medicaton and the local pharmarcy for acute illnesses and when trying a new drug that may or may not become long term.  </p>

Our insurance encourages it too and they've been incredibly helpful providing me the knowledge of what now is covered and what isn't b/c of aca.  But mail order is optional, the costs for my daughter's prescriptions are the same that way as filling it at the pharmacy with my drug card.   

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 02-25-2014 - 10:21pm

Thanks all.  I figured that was the case, but I wasn't sure.

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 02-25-2014 - 10:19pm

geschichtsgal wrote:
<p>When insurance requires mail order scripts-- does it require mail order for everything?  Or just ongoing medication?  Like, if I need antibiotics for strep throat can I just go to a local pharmacy?  Or do I have to wait for it to be mailed?</p>

IME, (going back almost 20 years when I worked in healthcare), mail order RX are only used for, or required for, maintenance meds. not for acute meds. (i.e. mail order for HRT, blood pressure meds, etc.  not for antibiotics, etc)

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Tue, 02-25-2014 - 10:19pm

My insurance does not require mail order but they do encourage it (cost being one way).   We use mail order for long term ongoing medicaton and the local pharmarcy for acute illnesses and when trying a new drug that may or may not become long term. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Tue, 02-25-2014 - 10:17pm

geschichtsgal wrote:
<p>When insurance requires mail order scripts-- does it require mail order for everything?  Or just ongoing medication?  Like, if I need antibiotics for strep throat can I just go to a local pharmacy?  Or do I have to wait for it to be mailed?</p>

Ours requires mail-order filling after three months. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 02-25-2014 - 10:09pm

When insurance requires mail order scripts-- does it require mail order for everything?  Or just ongoing medication?  Like, if I need antibiotics for strep throat can I just go to a local pharmacy?  Or do I have to wait for it to be mailed?

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