Poor kids - Rich kids

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Poor kids - Rich kids
7
Thu, 04-11-2013 - 4:38am

Saw a blog article today that relates to topics discussed here recently:

"The disparity was staggering. Children whose families were on welfare heard about 600 words per hour. Working-class children heard 1,200 words per hour, and children from professional families heard 2,100 words. By age 3, a poor child would have heard 30 million fewer words in his home environment than a child from a professional family. And the disparity mattered: the greater the number of words children heard from their parents or caregivers before they were 3, the higher their IQ and the better they did in school. TV talk not only didn’t help, it was detrimental.

Hart and Risley later wrote that children’s level of language development starts to level off when it matches that of their parents — so a language deficit is passed down through generations. They found that parents talk much more to girls than to boys (perhaps because girls are more sociable, or because it is Mom who does most of the care, and parents talk more to children of their gender). This might explain why young, poor boys have particular trouble in school. And they argued that the disparities in word usage correlated so closely with academic success that kids born to families on welfare do worse than professional-class children entirely because their parents talk to them less. In other words, if everyone talked to their young children the same amount, there would be no racial or socioeconomic gap at all. (Some other researchers say that while word count is extremely important, it can’t be the only factor.)"

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/10/the-power-of-talking-to-your-baby/

So, perhaps rather than have social workers try to be building inspectors, we should have them do what they are doing in Providence:

"The idea has been successfully put into practice a few times on a small scale, but it is about to get its first large-scale test, in Providence, R.I., which last month won the $5 million grand prize in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge, beating 300 other cities for best new idea. In Providence, only one in three children enter school ready for kindergarten reading. The city already has a network of successful programs in which nurses, mentors, therapists and social workers regularly visit pregnant women, new parents and children in their homes, providing medical attention and advice, therapy, counseling and other services. Now Providence will train these home visitors to add a new service: creating family conversation."

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 04-12-2013 - 3:15am
"This catches my attention, What a wonderful idea for Providence!" ------------- Yes, it seems like a good idea. In Denmark we always had visiting nurses for new babies, and I think we still do. They come visit in the home several times after the birth of a baby, weigh the baby, talk to the mother etc. It is a good way to offer some support and make sure baby starts on the right track.
Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 04-11-2013 - 6:07pm

"The idea has been successfully put into practice a few times on a small scale, but it is about to get its first large-scale test, in Providence, R.I., which last month won the $5 million grand prize in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge, beating 300 other cities for best new idea. In Providence, only one in three children enter school ready for kindergarten reading. The city already has a network of successful programs in which nurses, mentors, therapists and social workers regularly visit pregnant women, new parents and children in their homes, providing medical attention and advice, therapy, counseling and other services. Now Providence will train these home visitors to add a new service: creating family conversation."

 

This catches my attention, What a wonderful idea for Providence! 

In one of my psychology courses our assignment was to create a plan for a 19 yo pregnant girl, The situation was hypothetical but our plans were not and we pulled from the course what care and steps we would apply.   That included family counseling, diet advice, follow up in both pre-natal and post-natal visits, reserving parenting videos for her.  Incentives like what Providence RI won is encouraging.  

 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Thu, 04-11-2013 - 1:23pm

I can't help noticing that the article mentions no observation of households where the child speaks about a zillion words per day and the parents speak about 5 because they usually can't get a word in edgewise. 

Laughing

So true lolololol

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-22-2000
Thu, 04-11-2013 - 12:44pm

I can't help noticing that the article mentions no observation of households where the child speaks about a zillion words per day and the parents speak about 5 because they usually can't get a word in edgewise. 


Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 04-11-2013 - 12:01pm
Or else it is during the time they are with their parents. However, this would indeed be yet another argument for quality, involved childcare.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-2011
Thu, 04-11-2013 - 10:52am

So if professional-parents kids hear more words per hour, it is likely due to the child-care provider or nanny? Adds a new layer as professional-parents could be around less. Just my first thought.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Thu, 04-11-2013 - 10:33am

This is an excellent book on the topic. I've read excerpts in several classes. I've been meaning to read it from end to the other.

Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life