Speaking of Poverty

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Speaking of Poverty
134
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 9:18am

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130314/NEWS/303140038/IN-DEPTH-Study-County-s-poorer-kids-hit-hard-by-asthma

 

Poor kids have greater chances of asthma, Substandard housing being a contributing factor.  What would you change/add if money was no object?  What are your thoughts and experiences? 

 


 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 9:51am

I'm not sure I understand the question.  How should we help eliminate poverty?  Or are you interested in the asthma poverty connection?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:06am
The reality is not all families fall into the income brackets that can afford better care so No, I'm not asking how we eliminate poverty! But to what extent would you go to provide better care for children and for families that are poor... Or are you so removed from this to not know this exists?

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:10am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><a href="http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130314/NEWS/303140038/IN-DEPTH-Study-County-s-poorer-kids-hit-hard-by-asthma" rel="nofollow">http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130314/NEWS/303140038/IN-DEPTH-Study-County-s-poorer-kids-hit-hard-by-asthma</a></p><p> </p><p>Poor kids have greater chances of asthma, Substandard housing being a contributing factor.  What would you change/add if money was no object?  What are your thoughts and experiences? </p>

As an asthmatic, I know that mold, particularly household mold, is a huge trigger.  After the massive Christmas flood of 2008 in the condo building, even with the immediate amelioration efforts, I had problems with my asthma for months afterwards.  And I suspect the repair company didn't get it all, because once I moved to the "new" house (which is 40 years older than the condo), my asthma has cleared to the point that full days go by that I never need my rescue inhaler and I was using it daily at the condo. 

So it's no surprise to me that substandard housing would tend to lead to conditions that create and encourage mold growth. 

What would I change?  I would make albuterol an OTC drug, rather than prescription.  It's insane that albuterol requires a prescription. And I would lower the boom on drug companies who cranked up the price of albuterol in the new dispensers, like it was a brand new drug and not something that's been on the market for DECADES.

And I would make landlords overhaul their properties.  And I would tax ALL real properties of these slum lords at 3 times the rate, such increased revenues to go towards the increased medical costs of their tenants, until such time as their housing maintains a minimum standard.

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Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:11am

jamblessedthree wrote:
. Or are you so removed from this to not know this exists?

That was completely uncalled for.  How rude.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:13am

jamblessedthree wrote:
The reality is not all families fall into the income brackets that can afford better care so No, I'm not asking how we eliminate poverty! But to what extent would you go to provide better care for children and for families that are poor... Or are you so removed from this to not know this exists?

BTW, the problem isn't "lack of better care"; the problem is a society which refuses to hold slumlord responsible for maintaining and repairing their substandard housing properly.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:18am
I'll reply... Schools are title I here, More kids than not live in filth, They come to school dirty, unkept and underfed. If it's really bad hotline numbers are called and social work and HHS is big here, Thank God! I think we need to look more at the children during admissions, If preschool, as example, becomes a mandatory thing then let's make sure these kids are living in environments that enable growth and leanring potential too.. Social work could be a serious contender against more sophisticated professions tagged for tomorrow.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:19am
Who are the slum landlords?

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:23am

Do you mean in general?  Or are you expecting a list by name and address?

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:24am

jamblessedthree wrote:
The reality is not all families fall into the income brackets that can afford better care so No, I'm not asking how we eliminate poverty! But to what extent would you go to provide better care for children and for families that are poor... Or are you so removed from this to not know this exists?

I also don't quite understand the question. In essense, you're asking how people who live in poverty should be helped, but you're specifically NOT asking how to eliminate poverty.

I guess in that case, you'd take your unlimited budget and the power and influence that it affords you to pressure legislators into passing laws that require regular household inspections and fines for not complying with standards that would help alleviate some of the asthma and then also leave poverty intact. Though I suppose one could argue that by imposing inspections and standards that the cost of living would rise to reflect it, which would basically shut out some impoverished people to the dignity of their own living space and leave them with little choice than to double up. 

I guess without tackling poverty itself, it seems like a silly cause.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:24am

jamblessedthree wrote:
The reality is not all families fall into the income brackets that can afford better care so No, I'm not asking how we eliminate poverty! But to what extent would you go to provide better care for children and for families that are poor... Or are you so removed from this to not know this exists?

I definitely know that poverty exists.  The best way to make sure that poor kids have adequate health care is for the government to provide a single payer insurance system for everyone.  Also, schools often bring healthcare professionals into the schools in poorer areas to provide some baseline care-- immunizations, dental cleanings, etc.  Those are also good programs.  In terms of housing, local government needs to come down hard on landlords who rent substandard housing.  In my town (esp. because it is a college town), responsible landlords often get in trouble for stupid violations like one of the 10 fire alarms in a one bedroom apartment doesn't have batteries, but the slum lords basically never fix anything ever and pay someone off to look the other way.  Cities need to make sure that code violations are taken care of promptly, and renters need to form strong tenant unions to protect tenant rights.  I think that there needs to be a good balance between landlord and tenant rights, but now I'm kind of rambling.

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