Speaking of Poverty

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Speaking of Poverty
134
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 9:18am

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130314/NEWS/303140038/IN-DEPTH-Study-County-s-poorer-kids-hit-hard-by-asthma

 

Poor kids have greater chances of asthma, Substandard housing being a contributing factor.  What would you change/add if money was no object?  What are your thoughts and experiences? 

 

 

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:41am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Inspections are already in place, How would you change that or make them more effective? The link compared poverty to incomes at or greater than $80K, Are you saying that all families deserve to be in that latter+ category?</p>

I'm saying that no matter a family's income they have a right to safe housing and medical care.  I don't think everyone has a right to a 2000+ sqft house in a fancy HOA regulated neighborhood, but everyone should have a house or apartment without mold or structural damage, or that is bug-infested (there have been studies that link asthma with the presence of cockroaches and silverfish, as well), with working plumbing, etc.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:41am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Inspections are already in place, How would you change that or make them more effective? The link compared poverty to incomes at or greater than $80K, Are you saying that all families deserve to be in that latter+ category?</p>

ROFL.  You may want to try reading that one again. And asking for help if you still think it said that.

"...The median household income in communities with the top 20 percent of admissions was near the federal poverty level, $23,908 for a four-person household. Median income in the communities ranked at the bottom 20 percent of admissions was more than $80,000..."

So, that doesn't AT. ALL. state that poverty level is $80K and below.  The paragraph is talking about the top 20% of admissions for asthma treatment--not the top 20% of income.  Those who had the highest rates of asthma had a median income of $23,908.  Those who had the lowest rates of asthma had a median income of $80K.

Perhaps you should apologize to Geschichtsgal for suggesting she's the one who is too stupid to understand the topic.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:44am
Aye, Lol, Night Puss.

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:45am

geschichtsgal wrote:
We kind of lucked out, because his asthma has really improved over the last year or so.  He went from going through one inhaler a month to three per year.  </p>

That's right about where I am ever since I moved.  I've also only had one sinus infection since moving, whereas at the condo I was getting them nearly 6 times a year.  It probably also helps that since moving, I don't share walls and venting systems with smokers (there were several smokers in the condo building).

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:46am

jamblessedthree wrote:
I'll reply... Schools are title I here, More kids than not live in filth, They come to school dirty, unkept and underfed. If it's really bad hotline numbers are called and social work and HHS is big here, Thank God! I think we need to look more at the children during admissions, If preschool, as example, becomes a mandatory thing then let's make sure these kids are living in environments that enable growth and leanring potential too.. Social work could be a serious contender against more sophisticated professions tagged for tomorrow.

Whose homes get inspected? All the students? Or just the ones who show up looking like street urchins from the poor neighborhoods? Or would you subject every incoming student?

What happens if a kid's home fails inspection? Are they removed and placed with someone in a better, cleaner zip code? Or are they given funds for household repairs? If so, would those funds be distributed to families who rent? Live with other family members? Live in cheap trailers? What if the home structure is old and in need of other repairs, will each home be assessed for return on investment?

What happens when kids move? Will you require a new inspection? 

What about kids whose parents live separately? What if one home passes and the other does not? What if one has a ream of brand new construction paper and a shelf full of books and the other one has a PS3 and a pantry full of Doritos. Will the school then champion for the termination of parental rights of the parent that you find offensive?

What is your plan for all of the parents who opt out of school out of fear in facing whatever the consequences are of not meeting your standards? 

And one personal question, have you ever lived in poverty? I have. I have significant experience with poverty. Maybe before you go asking people how removed they are, you should ask yourself the same. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:49am

jamblessedthree wrote:
Well, The reality is that poverty isn't only an economic conditon but also a culture. No, I really don't mean to bring Romney into this but you just did!

Poverty is a CULTURE? 

WT HOLY F? 

Could you please expand on this? Because I think we live in separate realities.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:50am

puss_boo_kay wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;Inspections are already in place, How would you change that or make them more effective? The link compared poverty to incomes at or greater than $80K, Are you saying that all families deserve to be in that latter+ category?&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>ROFL.  You may want to try reading that one again. And asking for help if you still think it said that.</p><p>"...<em>The median household income in communities with the top 20 percent of admissions was near the federal poverty level, $23,908 for a four-person household. Median income in the communities ranked at the bottom 20 percent of admissions was more than $80,000</em>..."</p><p>So, that doesn't AT. ALL. state that poverty level is $80K and below.  The paragraph is talking about the top 20% of admissions for asthma treatment--not the top 20% of income.  Those who had the highest rates of asthma had a median income of $23,908.  Those who had the lowest rates of asthma had a median income of $80K.</p><p>Perhaps you should apologize to Geschichtsgal for suggesting she's the one who is too stupid to understand the topic.</p>

Also, people with well-managed asthma rarely need to visit the emergency room.  I didn't read the whole article, but it seems that some of the reason that there are more kids from poor families who visit the emergency room with asthma symptoms is that poor people tend to put off medical care until it is an emergency, because they can't afford a doctor's visit.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:51am
You're absolutely right Marla, I AM removed from poverty - no experience in it but we're not so segreated from it either and I don't buy the political nonsense that in orer to help those in poverty we must eliminate poverty!

 


 


Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:54am
There certainly is the poverty culture on both ends of the spectrum really, What don't you understand? Back to the op please, You have money to burn....

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 10:54am

just_another_marla wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>Well, The reality is that poverty isn't only an economic conditon but also a culture. No, I really don't mean to bring Romney into this but you just did!</blockquote></p><p>Poverty is a CULTURE? </p><p>WT HOLY F? </p><p>Could you please expand on this? Because I think we live in separate realities.</p>

There is actually a lot of research in social work about the culture of poverty.  Not people who are poor for a brief time due to specific circumstances, but families and areas where everyone is impoverished and has been for generations.  People who live in this culture tend to relate to the world differently than people who don't. 

Pages