Speaking of Poverty

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Speaking of Poverty
134
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 9:18am

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130314/NEWS/303140038/IN-DEPTH-Study-County-s-poorer-kids-hit-hard-by-asthma

 

Poor kids have greater chances of asthma, Substandard housing being a contributing factor.  What would you change/add if money was no object?  What are your thoughts and experiences? 

 


 


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Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 12:00pm
"The culture of poverty is a set of beliefs and some of that is the belief is once entitled always entitled," -------- I am not sure you read that right, wherever you got that. But let's say you were right, how would that affect asthma rates in the kids?
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 12:00pm

just_another_marla wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">geschichtsgal</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;just_another_marla&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&amp;gt;&amp;lt;div class="quote-author"&amp;gt;&amp;lt;em class="placeholder"&amp;gt;jamblessedthree&amp;lt;/em&amp;gt; wrote:&amp;lt;/div&amp;gt;Well, The reality is that poverty isn't only an economic conditon but also a culture. No, I really don't mean to bring Romney into this but you just did!&amp;lt;/blockquote&amp;gt;&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;Poverty is a CULTURE? &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;WT HOLY F? &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;Could you please expand on this? Because I think we live in separate realities.&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;There is actually a lot of research in social work about the culture of poverty.  Not people who are poor for a brief time due to specific circumstances, but families and areas where everyone is impoverished and has been for generations.  People who live in this culture tend to relate to the world differently than people who don't. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I understand the concept of generational poverty, but I don't think most people remain in poverty out of choice. I think what is seen academically here as "culture" is really just the consequence of a life lived on the margins. I'm not sure many here would really understand what poverty does to someone's self-esteem and confidence levels. </p>

The culture of poverty is a set of beliefs and some of that is the belief/mentality:  once entitled always entitled, It exists whether you want to believe it or not and I think it's sad.  That's probably why we don't make headway when it comes to helping the poor either.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:55am
Yes, I did PKA, Read it.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:54am

puss_boo_kay wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>You're absolutely right Marla, I AM removed from poverty - no experience in it but we're not so segreated from it either and I don't buy the political nonsense that in orer to help those in poverty we must eliminate poverty!</blockquote></p><p>You don't?  So.....you would prefer to KEEP poverty?</p><p>Why?</p>

No, I'm not saying we keep the poor poor, But there will always be the disparity of wealth.  Do you think that should ever be equal?

 


 


Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:48am
"People who live in this culture tend to relate to the world differently than people who don't." ------- OK, thanks for that explanation. So that would be a side effect, you could maybe call it, of chronic poverty for generations.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:46am

jamblessedthree wrote:
There certainly is the poverty culture on both ends of the spectrum really, What don't you understand? Back to the op please, You have money to burn....

If I have money to burn, I don't have any interest in keeping poverty intact. I think that's where I'm struggling with your question. 

Could you tackle some of the questions I asked about your inspection plans, btw? 

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:46am
"There certainly is the poverty culture" ------- Truly not trying to be snarky here, I genuinely do not know what you mean by this. Is it possible for you to explain what a poverty culture is and how it would affect something like asthma in kids?
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:41am
"DH has asthma, and we were both kind of shocked when his $5 inhalers started costing $50!" -------- That is so crazy! here it IS an OTC drug and it costs a few euros. We always have 3-4 of them lying around, just in case.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:38am
Tougher building regulations would be a place to start. My Danish BIL who is a carpenter worked in the US for a while and he was aghast at what passed for acceptable building standards stateside.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:38am

geschichtsgal wrote:
I completely agree, Marla.  And briefly scanning some articles, it looks like "culture of poverty" was coined in the 70s and there are lots of articles supporting parts of the original theory and lots of articles refuting it.  But, I do think that the intention is/was to describe the effect of poverty on things like self-esteem and confidence.  I have never bought the idea of the welfare queen popping out more babies so her check is larger each month.  It's not too bad being poor when you have parents who can lend you money if you get in a real bind or when you know it is temporary.  It's something else entirely when you know that if you make one slightly risky move and it turns out badly that you and your kids will be living in a car.

It's really difficult to think about long term choices when you live day to day. 

My 18 year old niece just became a mother a month ago. She always struggled in school and ended up dropping out. She's dropped out of GED prep, too. School makes her feel dumb. This however, does not mean that she lacks any aspirations in her life. She wants to live a life with the man of her dreams and have children. She wants to have a family, just like many other people. She had no reason to delay childbirth into her mid or late 20s. She's already got the guy, and she has no other life plans, so what's the point in waiting? Mind you, I'm not trying to justify her teen parenthood and her probable lifetime of poverty here, I'm simply trying to it explain it from the bottom up instead of the top down. 

We tell kids from day one that they need to get good grades so that they can get into the right college so that they can get the right job to be successful in life. This is a great message, until you consider that the kids who find that school is a constand struggle, finally accepts the fact they're pretty much shut out of a successful life. Unfortunately, we allow the poor to live in standards so low that we end up with threads like this, asking what to do with all those filthy poor kids whose homes aren't even conducive to thriving.

Sorry to use your post to springload my soapbox on.

I took offense because the way the term culture was being thrown around seemed to imply that people who live in poverty aren't deserving of help. 

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