Speaking of Poverty

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Speaking of Poverty
134
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 9:18am

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130314/NEWS/303140038/IN-DEPTH-Study-County-s-poorer-kids-hit-hard-by-asthma

 

Poor kids have greater chances of asthma, Substandard housing being a contributing factor.  What would you change/add if money was no object?  What are your thoughts and experiences? 

 


 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 4:28am

No bother mack, I know when these debates do 180s and turn into something else, Lol. But it's a good time to be a Catholic christian, Isn't it? God bless our new pope!

edited. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 6:23am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>I'm not in social work, But I'm taking classes towards it. Or is this a test? That's cute, Lol, You're no teacher.</p>

I'm genuinely curious why you've chosen social work? This board has been hopping for a few weeks and I haven't seen any kind of indication from your posts that you believe in social justice. You come across as anti-feminist, anti-poor poverty, and to be completely honest: elitist. Granted, I'm only at the tail end of the sophomore level of a sociology degree, so my experience is limited to just my classmates in the three sociology classes I've taken beyond intro, but I don't remember anyone sticking out as not being passionate about social justice, especially the students who have introduced themselves as heading toward a social work major transfer.

I understand that sociology and social work are two separate disciplines (and even in separate departments in most colleges and universities) and to be doubly fair, I haven't taken any specific social work courses, though you explained that you're taking them, it makes me curious how wide those differences really are. 

How far into your studies are you?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 6:51am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>I'm not in social work, But I'm taking classes towards it. Or is this a test? That's cute, Lol, You're no teacher.</p>

I'm genuinely curious why you've chosen social work? This board has been hopping for a few weeks and I haven't seen any kind of indication from your posts that you believe in social justice. You come across as anti-feminist, anti-poor people, and to be completely honest: elitist. Granted, I'm only at the tail end of the sophomore level of a sociology degree, so my experience is limited to just my classmates in the three sociology classes I've taken beyond intro, but I don't remember anyone sticking out as not being passionate about social justice, especially the students who have introduced themselves as heading toward a social work major transfer.

I understand that sociology and social work are two separate disciplines (and even in separate departments in most colleges and universities) and to be doubly fair, I haven't taken any specific social work courses, though you explained that you're taking them, it makes me curious how wide those differences really are. 

How far into your studies are you?

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 7:03am
Don't be silly, Jambles. I have never "tried" to read your Facebook posts. But we do have mutual friends, and until you hid me, I would occasionally see your posts on their walls. That's how Facebook works. You might have reason to be afraid, but not of me.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 7:33am

geschichtsgal wrote:
<p>My elementary school and the elementary school where my mom taught were both Title 1 schools.  Most of the kids were clean and well-fed.  Sure, there were always a few kids who were grubby and ate everything in sight at lunchtime, but they were few and far between.</p>

Yes I've worked or currently work in 3 Title 1 schools-have no idea what she's talking about. I don't even live in an area that is mostly Title 1 schools and to think that they are all grubby...I think it's called a big fat assumption.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 10:06am
This thread didn't do a 180.... It never got off of the ground, because you refused to answer some very basic questions for clarification purposes, but instead would make snide comments that make absolutely no sense at all. There is absolutely no way to debate with that.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sat, 03-16-2013 - 9:50am

Jam? Do you not want to engage in discussion with me about your studies?

I'm genuinely curious if your views are somewhat unique for someone pursuing social work, or if my experience and perception is simply too limited. I was thinking about this after I posted yesterday--in the past two years, roughly a third of my higher level sociology classmates were pursuing a degree in social work. A conservative number would be 50. These classes were discussion intensive, so during the course of the class, it became obvious who viewed poverty as a symptom of society and who viewed poverty as a symptom of deficient people. I've observed and made note of the fact that all of the social work majors were solidly unified on the social injustice front, they believed that poverty was a societal problem. The portion of the class that brought the counterpoint arguments, meaning that they believed that the lack of wealth and resources were the fault of the individual, have been primarily criminal justice majors (and really, just a handful of them.)

Like I said, my observations are limited to that so far, so I'm wondering how your views are received in your social work courses (or I assume sociology-heavy pre-requisites.) Based on my prior observations, I would conclude that you must find yourself in the heat of debate within the classroom often. Is that true? 

I have a brother who worked in a social work capacity for the Catholic church in downtown Detroit. He watched people line up everyday for bus passes and vouchers for food and toiletry gift bags. One homeless man told him what he enjoyed more than the food and supplies he received from the church, he enjoyed the human interaction with the people. In the street, no one looks you in eye. No one wants to admit that you're human. You are in fact, human garbage, and quite invisible. He just wanted someone to look him in the eye, talk to him and confirm that he was a real person.  

Social work isn't about scoring some kind of points in your own personal social circle or your church for pursuing a noble path, or for patting yourself on the back. It requires a humbling dose of humanity and you have to believe that all people are worthy of basic dignities. 

I just wonder how that kind of work is going to work out for you considering that you feel that people who wear fake Uggs or who make less than $80k a year are somehow beneath you. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Sat, 03-16-2013 - 12:40pm

just_another_marla wrote:
<p>Jam? Do you not want to engage in discussion with me about your studies?</p><p>I'm genuinely curious if your views are somewhat unique for someone pursuing social work, or if my experience and perception is simply too limited. I was thinking about this after I posted yesterday--in the past two years, roughly a third of my higher level sociology classmates were pursuing a degree in social work. A conservative number would be 50. These classes were discussion intensive, so during the course of the class, it became obvious who viewed poverty as a symptom of society and who viewed poverty as a symptom of deficient people. I've observed and made note of the fact that all of the social work majors were solidly unified on the social injustice front, they believed that poverty was a societal problem. The portion of the class that brought the counterpoint arguments, meaning that they believed that the lack of wealth and resources were the fault of the individual, have been primarily criminal justice majors (and really, just a handful of them.)</p><p>Like I said, my observations are limited to that so far, so I'm wondering how your views are received in your social work courses (or I assume sociology-heavy pre-requisites.) Based on my prior observations, I would conclude that you must find yourself in the heat of debate within the classroom often. Is that true? </p><p>I have a brother who worked in a social work capacity for the Catholic church in downtown Detroit. He watched people line up everyday for bus passes and vouchers for food and toiletry gift bags. One homeless man told him what he enjoyed more than the food and supplies he received from the church, he enjoyed the human interaction with the people. In the street, no one looks you in eye. No one wants to admit that you're human. You are in fact, human garbage, and quite invisible. He just wanted someone to look him in the eye, talk to him and confirm that he was a real person.  </p><p>Social work isn't about scoring some kind of points in your own personal social circle or your church for pursuing a noble path, or for patting yourself on the back. It requires a humbling dose of humanity and you have to believe that all people are worthy of basic dignities. </p><p>I just wonder how that kind of work is going to work out for you considering that you feel that people who wear fake Uggs or who make less than $80k a year are somehow beneath you. </p>

I'm legitimately curious about this as well. I had a very good friend in college who came from a wealthy family. She majored in social work--even went on to get her MSW. She has sold high end real estate in a major midwest market for years. As it turns out, she was waaaaay too much of a Republican to acutally be a social worker. High end condo sales feed her Ferragamo shoe habit much better. Her reaction to what a social worker actually makes a year during finals week our senior year remains one of the funniest moments of my college experience.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sat, 03-16-2013 - 2:03pm

For me, it's not so much about the income that she may make after she gets into the field, but more about the callous regard for the people who are in need of social work. 

If the first word that pops into your mind when you see a person wearing a $20 pair of perfectly functionable boots that mimic another design without the brand label is wannabe, I just don't know that you're equipped with the kind of empathy to do social work.

I'm totally comfortable with the possibility that I could be completely wrong and that all of my assumptions are baseless, however. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 03-17-2013 - 12:27pm

bordwithyou wrote:
Don't be silly, Jambles. I have never "tried" to read your Facebook posts. But we do have mutual friends, and until you hid me, I would occasionally see your posts on their walls. That's how Facebook works. You might have reason to be afraid, but not of me.

Ok Bord, You win, I must have changed my settings then..  It must have been after you turned down my friend request but I'm over it, Seriously I am. 

 


 


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