Speaking of Poverty

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Speaking of Poverty
134
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 9:18am

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20130314/NEWS/303140038/IN-DEPTH-Study-County-s-poorer-kids-hit-hard-by-asthma

 

Poor kids have greater chances of asthma, Substandard housing being a contributing factor.  What would you change/add if money was no object?  What are your thoughts and experiences? 

 

 

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Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Sun, 03-17-2013 - 2:06pm

This article touches on many of the same issues brought up here:

http://articles.latimes.com/2013/mar/14/local/la-me-jordan-20130315

"A retired elementary school principal in her late 50s, she'd been hired to give parenting tips to mothers at the rundown housing project because of her expertise in education. With a master's degree, a comfortable home in Inglewood and a close-knit family of high-achieving children, she inhabited a different world.

How could she hope to help these women? Only four months into the job, she felt overwhelmed by the unplanned pregnancies and meager job skills, the violence, disease and unnecessary death. In her first weeks of work, she met three mothers who had lost more than one son to murder.

[...]

In time, McMillan could see how hungry the women were to do things differently.

They wanted to help their children do better in school than they had done. They diligently practiced Spanish at the end of every class, smiling shyly as they tried to roll their "rrs," because they thought it would help them get jobs in their increasingly Latino neighborhood.

[...]

Mackey started attending the meetings. She got more involved in church, spending more time with family and friends. She also enrolled in a program at Jordan to get her GED, part of the initiative to transform Jordan. On the day her certificate was awarded last fall, she stood in front of a small crowd to read a poem she had written.

"Can people look inside and see that I have feelings? Do they know it's hard to make my way, to keep on trying every day?""

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Sun, 03-17-2013 - 1:37pm

Jams, thank you for answering some of the questions and explaining better what you meant.

Thing is, we agree that being poor should not have to mean that kids live in houses that make them sick. Rather than send out an army of social workers to inspect these kids, wouldn't it make better sense to make sure the building department does not allow sub-standard housing?

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 03-17-2013 - 12:45pm

To Marla, I do think there is a common element social workers (and those pursuing degrees) share.   There’s no debate but we have gotten into deep discussions at school, it’s not just poverty, its abuse and domestic violence, outreach for all kinds of reasons that sociology/psych majors are preparing themselves for.  A few of us have followed each other and still do.  Society and social justice is complex and I don’t know how far I will go.  What your brother sees is real and I totally agree that all many want is to be treated like human beings not charities, You don’t volunteer your time unless you are prepared for that IMO/E  and it truly is humbling, but there is the flip side whether you want to hear it or not.   I am incredibly certain there are people who are going to judge you b/c you’ve looked at them the wrong way or b/c you aren’t one of “them”, Social workers deal with a lot and there is no room for blinders!  A couple of semesters ago a professor spoke of something that stayed with me:  We were talking about different professions and the topic of right to life came up, she said chose your paths wisely, if you chose the public sector you keep your biases at bay and basically said the same thing about the catholic/private sector b/c you just don’t know what impression you’re making and that ultimate decision is NEVER yours to make - Moral being you aren’t out there to push your personal agenda onto anybody!  Next Fall will be my senior year if I take it that far, There’s methods and internship that I’d like to visit but I won’t bite off more than I can chew. 

You know nothing about me, There is no one exact profile for social work and I don’t believe those that say you’ve got to be like me/think like me or walk a mile in their shoes to do the job well, the field is political that way!   Where you think “feminism” fits in is beyond me too…  

This board is not a fair glimpse of real lives, OTOH it can be platform for a lot of krap people don’t talk about IRL.  Were you not around when I started a debate about fake Uggs?  I took a real life situation and took it to debate which stirred up an inferno about other “fake” things…  It was debatable!  And it was brought up again in this thread when a friendly bordie was being cute and tossed it my way, my reply was in kind.   Further, 80K isn’t some arbitrary number I pulled from the sky.  The link made comparisons b/w asthma at poverty levels and that income bracket which frankly, makes the study in itself…  Debatable!   (All studies are debatable.).   If you want to debate please do continue, Here, I will..  I don’t agree that you eliminate poverty, that’s rhetoric not even politicians have answers for and number 2.  There will always be somebody that makes more than you or less than you, high, middle and low classifications will always exist but just b/c your income falls at a federal low doesn’t mean conditions/standards should be substandard IMO and that’s where both the link and I were going, some purposely had trouble grasping that!   You tell me, what inspections would you change and how.  You tried to test me there and funny enough, you never answered it yourself (or was that ducky?).  What I get to see isn’t perfect but there are some great social programs at our schools and I see it b/c I work in them and b/c my kids are there but I know my own experiences are limited too.  If we have the power to control or fix what is making sick kids sick then why shouldn’t we?   Or do we just wait for routine inspections, cps or sweep it under the rug b/c you’re poor……  

Wow, The ramble of the day, Lol!  Have a great day.   

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 03-17-2013 - 12:40pm

Deleted, double post. 

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 03-17-2013 - 12:27pm

bordwithyou wrote:
Don't be silly, Jambles. I have never "tried" to read your Facebook posts. But we do have mutual friends, and until you hid me, I would occasionally see your posts on their walls. That's how Facebook works. You might have reason to be afraid, but not of me.

Ok Bord, You win, I must have changed my settings then..  It must have been after you turned down my friend request but I'm over it, Seriously I am. 

 

 

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Registered: 05-31-2011
Sat, 03-16-2013 - 2:03pm

For me, it's not so much about the income that she may make after she gets into the field, but more about the callous regard for the people who are in need of social work. 

If the first word that pops into your mind when you see a person wearing a $20 pair of perfectly functionable boots that mimic another design without the brand label is wannabe, I just don't know that you're equipped with the kind of empathy to do social work.

I'm totally comfortable with the possibility that I could be completely wrong and that all of my assumptions are baseless, however. 

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Registered: 02-20-2013
Sat, 03-16-2013 - 12:40pm

just_another_marla wrote:
<p>Jam? Do you not want to engage in discussion with me about your studies?</p><p>I'm genuinely curious if your views are somewhat unique for someone pursuing social work, or if my experience and perception is simply too limited. I was thinking about this after I posted yesterday--in the past two years, roughly a third of my higher level sociology classmates were pursuing a degree in social work. A conservative number would be 50. These classes were discussion intensive, so during the course of the class, it became obvious who viewed poverty as a symptom of society and who viewed poverty as a symptom of deficient people. I've observed and made note of the fact that all of the social work majors were solidly unified on the social injustice front, they believed that poverty was a societal problem. The portion of the class that brought the counterpoint arguments, meaning that they believed that the lack of wealth and resources were the fault of the individual, have been primarily criminal justice majors (and really, just a handful of them.)</p><p>Like I said, my observations are limited to that so far, so I'm wondering how your views are received in your social work courses (or I assume sociology-heavy pre-requisites.) Based on my prior observations, I would conclude that you must find yourself in the heat of debate within the classroom often. Is that true? </p><p>I have a brother who worked in a social work capacity for the Catholic church in downtown Detroit. He watched people line up everyday for bus passes and vouchers for food and toiletry gift bags. One homeless man told him what he enjoyed more than the food and supplies he received from the church, he enjoyed the human interaction with the people. In the street, no one looks you in eye. No one wants to admit that you're human. You are in fact, human garbage, and quite invisible. He just wanted someone to look him in the eye, talk to him and confirm that he was a real person.  </p><p>Social work isn't about scoring some kind of points in your own personal social circle or your church for pursuing a noble path, or for patting yourself on the back. It requires a humbling dose of humanity and you have to believe that all people are worthy of basic dignities. </p><p>I just wonder how that kind of work is going to work out for you considering that you feel that people who wear fake Uggs or who make less than $80k a year are somehow beneath you. </p>

I'm legitimately curious about this as well. I had a very good friend in college who came from a wealthy family. She majored in social work--even went on to get her MSW. She has sold high end real estate in a major midwest market for years. As it turns out, she was waaaaay too much of a Republican to acutally be a social worker. High end condo sales feed her Ferragamo shoe habit much better. Her reaction to what a social worker actually makes a year during finals week our senior year remains one of the funniest moments of my college experience.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

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Registered: 05-31-2011
Sat, 03-16-2013 - 9:50am

Jam? Do you not want to engage in discussion with me about your studies?

I'm genuinely curious if your views are somewhat unique for someone pursuing social work, or if my experience and perception is simply too limited. I was thinking about this after I posted yesterday--in the past two years, roughly a third of my higher level sociology classmates were pursuing a degree in social work. A conservative number would be 50. These classes were discussion intensive, so during the course of the class, it became obvious who viewed poverty as a symptom of society and who viewed poverty as a symptom of deficient people. I've observed and made note of the fact that all of the social work majors were solidly unified on the social injustice front, they believed that poverty was a societal problem. The portion of the class that brought the counterpoint arguments, meaning that they believed that the lack of wealth and resources were the fault of the individual, have been primarily criminal justice majors (and really, just a handful of them.)

Like I said, my observations are limited to that so far, so I'm wondering how your views are received in your social work courses (or I assume sociology-heavy pre-requisites.) Based on my prior observations, I would conclude that you must find yourself in the heat of debate within the classroom often. Is that true? 

I have a brother who worked in a social work capacity for the Catholic church in downtown Detroit. He watched people line up everyday for bus passes and vouchers for food and toiletry gift bags. One homeless man told him what he enjoyed more than the food and supplies he received from the church, he enjoyed the human interaction with the people. In the street, no one looks you in eye. No one wants to admit that you're human. You are in fact, human garbage, and quite invisible. He just wanted someone to look him in the eye, talk to him and confirm that he was a real person.  

Social work isn't about scoring some kind of points in your own personal social circle or your church for pursuing a noble path, or for patting yourself on the back. It requires a humbling dose of humanity and you have to believe that all people are worthy of basic dignities. 

I just wonder how that kind of work is going to work out for you considering that you feel that people who wear fake Uggs or who make less than $80k a year are somehow beneath you. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-14-2011
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 10:06am
This thread didn't do a 180.... It never got off of the ground, because you refused to answer some very basic questions for clarification purposes, but instead would make snide comments that make absolutely no sense at all. There is absolutely no way to debate with that.
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Registered: 02-24-2010
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 7:33am

geschichtsgal wrote:
<p>My elementary school and the elementary school where my mom taught were both Title 1 schools.  Most of the kids were clean and well-fed.  Sure, there were always a few kids who were grubby and ate everything in sight at lunchtime, but they were few and far between.</p>

Yes I've worked or currently work in 3 Title 1 schools-have no idea what she's talking about. I don't even live in an area that is mostly Title 1 schools and to think that they are all grubby...I think it's called a big fat assumption.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

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