Spinoff: Housing upgrades/changes.

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Spinoff: Housing upgrades/changes.
21
Wed, 10-30-2013 - 7:13pm

The other thread just makes me curious.  How long ago did you buy your house, and what upgrades/changes have you done to it since you purchased it? And what else do you need or want to do?

 

We bought ours in Jan of 2007.  As part of the contract, the previous owners added a new balcony upstairs, a new shower enclosure in the master bath, and repainted The Boy's room.  When we moved in we repainted the rec room, added a gas line in the kitchen, put in a new gas stove, and a new refrigerator.  Since then we have repainted The Girl's room, the downstairs bathroom, the guest room, and the master bedroom; put in new carpet in the downstairs and on the stairs; put in a new patio; put in a new sidewalk and redid the front porch; took the (godawfully ugly) wallpaper out of the kitchen and repainted; and put in one new AC/heating unit (we have two-zone heat/air). 

The most pressing things we need to do are put in a storm shelter (in progress, due to a FEMA grant) and have some work done on the ducts.  Other things we want to do are replace the kitchen floor, repaint/reface the kitchen cabinets, and redo the countertop.  The kitchen is structurally sound and has a great workflow - it's just ugly.  We'd also like to have new gutters - again, functional, just not very pretty.  Oh, and we have a dead tree in the backyard that needs to come down (stupid drought).

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

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Registered: 01-08-2009
Wed, 10-30-2013 - 9:51pm
We bought the house in 2000, moved in in 2001. Put in new floors in entryway, bathrooms and kitchen, took down a wall between living room and dining room, raised ceiling and put in four skylights. Took down wallpaper, painted pretty much entire house. In later years, rebuilt deck and took out wooden play structures, landscapes back yard, extended patio. Put in new water heater and air conditioning motor. Have gradually replaced laundry and kitchen appliances except still have one old refrigerator. Painted wooden trim and garage door on exterior. Replaced barroom counters and have new sinks and fixture in four bathrooms. Moulded out ugly fiberglass tub and surround in kids' bathroom and put in new tub, tile and shower. Put in new shower surround and toilet stall in downstairs bathroom. Upgraded lighting fixtures in exterior of house, stairwell, and hallways. Put in ceiling fans in three bedrooms. Probably more that I am forgetting. Next: New flooring in carpeted areas, repajnting some rooms, upgrading furniture in den and family room.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Wed, 10-30-2013 - 9:51pm

><p>I only see problems with water leaking with a sky light.  But I'm a pessimist when it comes to home repairs and it's not my house.  I hope you check the floor can support a wider island.  </p>[/quote]

That is my one concern about a sky light, water leakage. 

We are on a concrete slab so weight is not an issue.

In the picture the counter to the left is what I am talking about.  I would like it cut off even with the sink and then widened to make it more usedful. 


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Avatar for savcal2011
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Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 10-30-2013 - 9:58pm
Actually it is often more than 20 minutes. $3000 is pretty standard. It's permitting, installation, and the shelter itself. Which is about a bazillion pounds of concrete, rated to withstand a F5 tornado. An investment well worth it - that will add well more than $3000 value to our home. We were going to install one anyway; it's important enough to do so. But now it will simply cost us less.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Wed, 10-30-2013 - 9:59pm

Forgot most of the outside stuff.   New driveway, landscaping bricks added around flower beds.  In ground water sprinklers.   Storage shed in back yard.

Also did an upgrade of the master bath about 3 years ago,  Got rid of the molded shower surround and put in tile,  painted the cabinets, replaced the mirror and light fixture.


Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Wed, 10-30-2013 - 10:00pm
We had a skylight in the laundry room in our house in AZ. No leakage problems - except when it got cracked by large hail. We have one in our guest bath now and, again, no leakage problems.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Wed, 10-30-2013 - 11:05pm

emptynester2009 wrote:
<p>&gt;&lt;p&gt;I only see problems with water leaking with a sky light.  But I'm a pessimist when it comes to home repairs and it's not my house.  I hope you check the floor can support a wider island.  &lt;/p&gt;
</p><p><span style="font-family:comic sans ms,sans-serif; font-size:medium">That is my one concern about a sky light, water leakage.  <br /></span></p><p><span style="font-family:comic sans ms,sans-serif; font-size:medium"> We are on a concrete slab so weight is not an issue.</span></p><p><span style="font-family:comic sans ms,sans-serif; font-size:medium">In the picture the counter to the left is what I am talking about.  I would like it cut off even with the sink and then widened to make it more usedful.  <br /></span></p><p><span style="font-family:comic sans ms,sans-serif; font-size:medium"><br /></span></p>[/quote]

Oh, I see.  It's a good counter for chargers and maybe a ceramic rooster (my favorite!) and vase.  But definitely hard to seat and eat at.  That change to lower counter where you can eat would be much better imo.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 10-31-2013 - 7:01am

TMI

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 10-31-2013 - 8:07am
We've had the driveway repaved and we've replastered some of the walls that were caving in. The house was in pretty good mechanical condition when we bought it, Many old homes in the area have oil heat but the previous owner had updated to gas and replaced the siding with vinyl before we moved in. We were lucky the roof was fairly new when we bought it too, I've only added cosmetic touches mostly.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 10-31-2013 - 8:27am

You've not seen old newspapers b/w the walls have you thardy? That's what people in the old days insulated with, Oh the stories I've heard..... And parts of trees used as support columns..  There was newspaper scrap my neighbor found when they updated that dated back to the very early 1900s. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 10-31-2013 - 2:10pm

We bought this house 2 years ago precisely because it needed nothing done to it. It's an 1848 Greek revival and the previous owners completely renovated it. However, there is no such thing as a perfect house, so we replaced some carpet in the upstairs hall, and put maple floors in our D's room because she didn't want carpet in her bedroom. (Most of the house has maple, cherry or oak floors, anyway--they knew how to build in those days!.) We took down some girly wallpaper in our son's room and painted it green (way too dark, IMO, but he likes it). At some point, we'll get rid of the ceramic sink in the kitchen and put in stainless steel.

We did something almost every year to our old house, a 1790 Federal with a carriage house and barn, including remodeling the kitchen twice, adding on a breakfast room and patio and replacing the porch stairs; ripping out all the carpet everywhere, remodeling 2 bathrooms, painting just about every room in the house at least once, insulating and replacing the roof. We still had a problem with ice dams the entire 11 years we lived there, but we loved that house and would buy it again!