Spring has sprung!!!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Spring has sprung!!!
46
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 8:45am

1.  What plants are sprouting or blooming in your yard?

2. Forsythia: love it? Hate it?

3. When will you be planting this summer's herbs and kitchen garden veggies?

4. How many days last week were you able to leave the windows open?  Or at least turn off the heat for the day?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 5:12pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
You can determine if you know what it is or isn't from a picture. SMH

And when Emptynester looks at some Google images to see what it is, you know what she might post?  "Don't know what that is."  Which is what she posted in the first place.

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 6:03pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">Probably not, a picture would not give me enough to go on to form an opinion of love/hate.</span></p><p><span style="font-size:small"><strong><span style="text-align:left">You are not serious, are you? You couldn't determine from a picture what something is and if you like it or not? <img src="/forums/sites/all/libraries/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/img/smiley-surprised.gif" alt="Surprised" title="Surprised" border="0" /></span></strong></span></p>

Is it a perennial? or an annual? How large is it? Does it ovedtake your lawn? Does it need full sun or parital sun? Does it smell? Does it attract insects? Is it hard to get rid of? Does it spread? There are lots of things that factor in ...

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2013
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 7:35pm

And when Emptynester looks at some Google images to see what it is, you know what she might post?  "Don't know what that is."  Which is what she posted in the first place.

Maybe she will know what it is after seeing a picture. Hence, the reason I suggested googling a picture. SMH.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 8:01pm

emptynester2009 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">grapthars_hammer</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;1.  What plants are sprouting or blooming in your yard?&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;2. Forsythia: love it? Hate it?&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;3. When will you be planting this summer's herbs and kitchen garden veggies?&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;4. How many days last week were you able to leave the windows open?  Or at least turn off the heat for the day?&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>Actually spring will not be her officially until DD1 birthday on Thursday,</p><p>1, A lot of our stuff does not actually die off in the winter.  Our holly bushes have bloomed all winter, in fact one of our best years yet.  Our lilies are coming up, rose bushes are turning green.</p><p>2, Do not know what that is,</p><p>3. DH does that.  As soon as he can get the ground ready.  It has been too wet for the last couple of weeks to get it tilled.  Worked on it yesterday and his tiller died..  Today will probably be a trip to Lowes.</p><p>4. We do not keep our windows open because of allergies.  It was a bit cold I think last Tuesday and this last weekend but the other day temp wise we could have opened our windows.  We do not usually actuallly turn off the heat until it get hot enough to tuen on the air conditioner because it only runs when cold anyway. </p>

It's a shrub.  It's sole claim to fame (in my opinion, which may not even be worth the full 2 cents!) is that it flowers very very early.

It's also, imo, a nuisance plant.  They will take over a yard quickly if you don't keep them cut back and they grow so thickly, they provide cover for nuisance wildlife, like woodchucks, and rats and other not-so-appealing forms of nature.  I cut the ones I have left down to the ground a couple times throughout the summer.  Which means I don't get the yellow flowers in early spring, because they form on older growth, but it keeps the plants manageable size where the woodchuck who wants to live under my shed can't hide.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forsythia 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 8:04pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<blockquote><div style="font-weight:bold"><em>blackandwhitemolly</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"&gt;2, Do not know what that is,&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"&gt;Google it lol&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote><p style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"></p><p style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">Why, if I do not know what it is then obviouslly I neither  love it or hate it.</p><p style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"><strong>If you google it and go and see what it is, you might then have an opinion. smh</strong></p>

It's a nuisance shrub; this is a fluff thread.  It's really not so important that anyone actually has to go google the stupid thing before they're entitled to have an opinion (or refuse to have an opinion) on it.  Seriously.  You may take your fluff threads so much more seriously, but this is MY fluff thread and I just fuqqing don't.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 8:05pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px">And when Emptynester looks at some Google images to see what it is, you know what she might post?  "Don't know what that is."  Which is what she posted in the first place.</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:13px">Maybe she will know what it is after seeing a picture. Hence, the reason I suggested googling a picture. SMH.</span></strong></p>

It's a fluff thread!  This is NOT that critical.  Good lord, woman; find something constructive to do.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2013
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 8:18pm

It's a fluff thread!  This is NOT that critical.  Good lord, woman; find something constructive to do.

ummm...I did, I went to kickboxing class so I can get into a bikini this summer :)

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 8:24pm

When we moved here we had what ended up being nuisance plant.  We never did find out what it was,  it was a tall, about 8 foot bush.  It did not flower but was kind of pretty because the leaves were varigated. 

It was in the front of the house near the front door.  It grew so quickly that DH had to trim it a couple of times a month otherwise people walking up to our front door would get slapped in the face by it.  He finally got so frustrated we took it out. 

In another setting we may have liked it and did talk about moving it but he was so tired of it he just wanted it gone. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 8:27pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p><span>It's a fluff thread!  This is NOT that critical.  Good lord, woman; find something constructive to do.</span></p><p><span>ummm...I did, I went to kickboxing class so I can get into a bikini this summer :)</span></p>

Oh, I'm so sorry you porked up so hugely over the winter!  That must be terribly embarrassing and discouraging, considering how hard you worked to get into a swim suit for your cruise last year!!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Mon, 03-17-2014 - 8:31pm

I have 3 burning bushes that I dearly dearly love--if only they weren't right by the front door.  Like your former bush, these have to be carefully pruned to keep them from taking over the whole house.  I generally chop them down to about 18" every winter while they're dormant, although this year, could be tricky getting it done, since every time it's cold enough to be safe to prune them, we've had butt-tons of snow on the ground, but I'm hoping to get to them this week. before the growing season really hits.

I'm considering hiring a landscaping company to come in and move the three of them to my back fence, where they can grow to their little heart's desire, pull all the rest of the shrubs in front of the house and install shorter perennials, like hydrangeas, native grasses and put in more gladiolus.