Starting off Sunday fluff

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Starting off Sunday fluff
364
Sun, 09-29-2013 - 10:46am

We've gone to church, watching Meet The Press, took ground beef out of my freezer for meatballs, jotting notes down for the week then planning for the week ahead, clip coupons, and planning to watch the Cleveland Browns/Bengals game later, Ultimate rivals!  Lol! 

How is your Sunday going? 

 

 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 10:00pm
Oh, Thardy, you will go to any lengths to try to make me look wrong or bad, and it hardly ever works. It's certainly not working this time. I wonder whether it's more tiring to be almost always right, or almost always wrong?
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:58pm
Well, first of all, Thardy, it is not offering up prayers, which. ANYONE can do, but offering a mass, which a monk cannot do unless he happens also to be a priest. And I told you at the beginning that I looked it all up years ago, before I ever bought my first Mass card. Since that was over twenty years ago, I decided to look it up again in case something had changed. It appears your attitude is idiosyncratic to you rather than indicative of a general attitude, which is where etiquette books come in handy. You never know when you just ask someone random whether they are giving you a consensus wander or their own odd take on the issue.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:55pm

Sounds pretty ghoulish to me.  But I also don't enjoy reminding the bereaved of their loss at random times that will make *me* feel better.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:46pm
I mentioned it twice, Thardy, in the context of the discussion on etiquette. In this case, even though the etiquette books say something is okay, it would not be OK if you knew the gesture would be offensive.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:41pm

mortyswife wrote:
<p>Gotcha. I have only seen them at wakes and to tell you the truth, most people don't keep them forever but it is a nice gesture. </p>

It's basically asking a monk somewhere to say prayers instead of the mass card purchaser, lol.  It actually is, when "buying" a mass card for some poor family every time one passes a name church and apparently, until this very day, never quite knew the tradition behind the whole thing.  Talk about insincerity.  Too bad the Catholics are too polite too tell someone to say their own darn prayers!

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:37pm

chestnuthooligan wrote:
Thardy? Masses offered are "tacky"? My mother attended and offered masses by the dozens as an old school Catholic. As a non believer, I can still appreciate how someone could defer to my mom's beliefs in a way she would love. Besides, if mom was right about the Catholic Church, a little spiritual intersession into her afterlife couldn't hurt.

Oh.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:36pm

Curious, Bord, is there a reason you keep bringing up what you would or wouldn't do should a member of my family die? 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:34pm
Thardy? Masses offered are "tacky"? My mother attended and offered masses by the dozens as an old school Catholic. As a non believer, I can still appreciate how someone could defer to my mom's beliefs in a way she would love. Besides, if mom was right about the Catholic Church, a little spiritual intersession into her afterlife couldn't hurt.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-15-2013
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:28pm

Gotcha. I have only seen them at wakes and to tell you the truth, most people don't keep them forever but it is a nice gesture. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 10-01-2013 - 9:23pm
Out of Curiousity, I went and looked up Mass card etiquette. This is typical of what I found: "For a Catholic family, consider getting the family a mass card in lieu of flowers. You don’t have to be Catholic to get a mass card. You make a donation to the Church, and in turn, the Church promises to say prayers or a mass on behalf of the soul of the deceased. The mass card says when the mass will take place, and you can give the card to the deceased family. For fellow Catholics, purchasing a mass card is a gesture of faith, compassion, and solidarity. For non-Catholics, sending a mass card shows your understanding, respect, and thoughtfulness." Now, knowing what Thardy thinks of masses offered by non-Catholics, I would not offend her by offering one for a member of her family, but it doesn't appear her attitude is typical.

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