Super Sunday

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Super Sunday
590
Sun, 04-14-2013 - 1:03pm

1. What's for dinner?

2. When invited to BBQ's in the summer, what signature dish do you usually bring?

3. Where did your parents meet?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Sun, 04-14-2013 - 10:08pm

I was raised that if you issue an invitation to dinner, you provide the meal you invited your guests over for. The idea of inviting someone over for a meal and then asking them to provide part of the meal you just asked them over for is just odd to me. My Bunco group agrees. Every month there are between 12-16 of us. Hostess provides dinner, snacks & drinks. I've gone over to a close friend's house and helped her bake before it and she's stayed after and helped me clean up--but this is one of my very closest friends. Quite honestly, we all really enjoy it. I made two soups and salad (that dressing recipe from Hammer was DELICIOUS and quite a hit) and chocolate cupcakes. I spent a few hours in the afternoon in the kitchen then enjoyed the evening w/my girlsfriends. It wasn't spectacularly difficult...

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Sun, 04-14-2013 - 10:14pm
My friends do different types of get togethers. We do dinner parties where the host makes some dishes and then everyone brings a side. Most other parties and bbq's the host will make the majority of the food and then everyone will bring a dessert or an appetizer.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 04-14-2013 - 10:16pm
We have a couple of potluck-type events every year that we go to. Annual church picnic in May. Neighborhood association picnic at the neighborhood park in August. A cookie exchange with a dozen or so friends the first weekend in December. When the kids were in private school, there was a back to school picnic where the PTO provided burgers and brats and different grades were assigned sides, drinks, and desserts. But other than these, I tend to avoid the potluck type parties.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sun, 04-14-2013 - 10:24pm

I have an aunt who loves backyard summer parties. She has a pool, a trampoline, yard games, a fire pit, a really nice grill, and a ton of comfortable outdoor furniture. She absolutely loves throwing these little parties, and we love attending them. We contribute with passing dishes so that she can keep costs down and have more parties. She has these parties every other weekend or so through the summer, so the expense would add up quickly.

When I host dinner I don't ask for passing dishes but I always appreciate wine. I'd rather plan the meal from start to finish. If I'm making something heavy and creamy for dinner, I don't want cheesecake for dessert. If I'm making something like homemade pizza for guests, I don't want a cheese plate beforehand and chocolate cake might prove to be too much afterward, I'm more likely to offer fresh sliced fruit instead. I'm not a foodie and I don't prepare or eat a lot of exotic dishes, but I don't want to try to have to figure out how to work in something that isn't paired well with what I've already planned and prepared. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Sun, 04-14-2013 - 10:39pm
My gf is a chef so we love when she has dinner parties and such as she makes all different kinds of things.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sun, 04-14-2013 - 10:47pm

I guess in my circle it is about evenly divided between pot puck and host provided.

It tends to lean more to pot luck when there really isn't a host as much as a host house.  A group plans something,  someone offers to have it at their house. That is generally a pot luck.

If it a straight invitation where someone invites guests to their house it is generally not a pot luck, but host provided. 

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 04-15-2013 - 4:21am
"Yeah, If I am seriously trying to lose weight I won't eat just anything." --------- I am not trying to lose weight. In fact, until 2-3 months ago, I was trying to gain a little. I still used the same approach, because I do not want to eat empty calories for no good reason. I will spring for them for the sake of 2-3 homemade sweets that I love, like my southern friend's incomparable lemon-meringue pie, but that is about it.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 04-15-2013 - 7:31am
am trying to lose weight. And so I am constantly making food choices. And I seldom choose sugary or fatty things. When I do, it's something very special such as my trifle at Christmas or some good quality chocolate at Easter. At potlucks or when I am at someone's house, and eating "off plan," I will usually choose an interesting main dish or a glass of wine over dessert. I personally do not care for store bought baked goods or desserts that are a compilation of processed ingredients (such as the infamous "cherry dump cake," which is the favorite of potlucks here.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Mon, 04-15-2013 - 7:58am
Bord, I am exactly the same way. I would rather have some yummy potato, for example (which I don't usually eat), a great piece of bread or a glass of wine than some repulsive sugar bomb.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
In reply to: merella
Mon, 04-15-2013 - 8:49am

That's pretty much how things work here.  My neighborhood is pretty casual and friendly - at our end of the block, we are always having impromptu gatherings on weekend nights.  Someone might say - "Hey, want to get together on Friday night?" which then means everyone chips in to bring something.  We also have a block party for 4th of July - potluck for that too.  My kids all play sports so at the end of the season, someone offers to host the team party (usually a house with a pool) and then everyone brings things.

Now, dinner parties or dinner invitations are a completely different thing.  When we host or are invited to someone else's house for dinner, the host always provides the entire meal.  The polite thing to do is ask if the host would like guests to bring anything, but the host politely declines and provides the meal.  In those cases, the guests bring some sort of hostess gift.

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