Talking about food

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Registered: 02-24-2009
Talking about food
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Fri, 02-05-2010 - 6:14am

From the NYT. I like Michael Pollan's ideas.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/02/health/02brod.html?em

Rules Worth Following, for Everyone’s Sake

By JANE E. BRODY
Published: February 1, 2010
In the more than four decades that I have been reading and writing about the findings of nutritional science, I have come across nothing more intelligent, sensible and simple to follow than the 64 principles outlined in a slender, easy-to-digest new book called “Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual,” by Michael Pollan.

Mr. Pollan is not a biochemist or a nutritionist but rather a professor of science journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. You may recognize his name as the author of two highly praised books on food and nutrition, “In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto” and “The Omnivore’s Dilemma.” (All three books are from Penguin.)

If you don’t have the time and inclination to read the first two, you can do yourself and your family no better service than to invest $11 and one hour to whip through the 139 pages of “Food Rules” and adapt its guidance to your shopping and eating habits.

Chances are you’ve heard any number of the rules before. I, for one, have been writing and speaking about them for decades. And chances are you’ve yet to put most of them into practice. But I suspect that this little book, which is based on research but not annotated, can do more than the most authoritative text to get you motivated to make some important, lasting, health-promoting and planet-saving changes in what and how you eat.

Reasons to Change

Two fundamental facts provide the impetus Americans and other Westerners need to make dietary changes. One, as Mr. Pollan points out, is that populations who rely on the so-called Western diet — lots of processed foods, meat, added fat, sugar and refined grains — “invariably suffer from high rates of the so-called Western diseases: obesity, Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer.” Indeed, 4 of the top 10 killers of Americans are linked to this diet.

As people in Asian and Mediterranean countries have become more Westernized (affluent, citified and exposed to the fast foods exported from the United States), they have become increasingly prone to the same afflictions.

The second fact is that people who consume traditional diets, free of the ersatz foods that line our supermarket shelves, experience these diseases at much lower rates. And those who, for reasons of ill health or dietary philosophy, have abandoned Western eating habits often experience a rapid and significant improvement in their health indicators.

I will add a third reason: our economy cannot afford to continue to patch up the millions of people who each year develop a diet-related ailment, and our planetary resources simply cannot sustain our eating style and continue to support its ever-growing population.

In his last book, Mr. Pollan summarized his approach in just seven words: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” The new book provides the practical steps, starting with advice to avoid “processed concoctions,” no matter what the label may claim (“no trans fats,” “low cholesterol,” “less sugar,” “reduced sodium,” “high in antioxidants” and so forth).

As Mr. Pollan puts it, “If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don’t.”

Do you already avoid products made with high-fructose corn syrup? Good, but keep in mind, sugar is sugar, and if it is being added to a food that is not normally sweetened, avoid it as well. Note, too, that refined flour is hardly different from sugar once it gets into the body.

Also avoid foods advertised on television, imitation foods and food products that make health claims. No natural food is simply a collection of nutrients, and a processed food stripped of its natural goodness to which nutrients are then added is no bargain for your body.

Those who sell the most healthful foods — vegetables, fruits and whole grains — rarely have a budget to support national advertising. If you shop in a supermarket (and Mr. Pollan suggests that wherever possible, you buy fresh food at farmers’ markets), shop the periphery of the store and avoid the center aisles laden with processed foods. Note, however, that now even the dairy case has been invaded by products like gunked-up yogurts.

Follow this advice, and you will have to follow another of Mr. Pollan’s rules: “Cook.”

“Cooking for yourself,” he writes, ��is the only sure way to take back control of your diet from the food scientists and food processors.” Home cooking need not be arduous or very time-consuming, and you can make up time spent at the stove with time saved not visiting doctors or shopping for new clothes to accommodate an expanding girth.

Although the most wholesome eating pattern consists of three leisurely meals a day, and preferably a light meal at night, if you must have snacks, stick to fresh and dried fruits, vegetables and nuts, which are naturally loaded with healthful nutrients. I keep a dish of raisins and walnuts handy to satisfy the urge to nibble between meals. I also take them along for long car trips. Feel free to use the gas-station restroom, but never “get your fuel from the same place your car does,” Mr. Pollan writes.

Treating Treats as Treats

Perhaps the most important rules to put into effect as soon as possible are those aimed at the ever-expanding American waistline. If you eat less, you can afford to pay more for better foods, like plants grown in organically enriched soil and animals that are range-fed.

He recommends that you do all your eating at a table, not at a desk, while working, watching television or driving. If you’re not paying attention to what you’re eating, you’re likely to eat more than you realize.

But my favorite tip, one that helped me keep my weight down for decades, is a mealtime adage, “Stop eating before you’re full” — advice that has long been practiced by societies as diverse as Japan and France. (There is no French paradox, by the way: the French who stay slim eat smaller portions, leisurely meals and no snacks.)

Practice portion control and eat slowly to the point of satiation, not fullness. The food scientists Barbara J. Rolls of Penn State and Brian Wansink of Cornell, among others, have demonstrated that people eat less when served smaller portions on smaller plates. “There is nothing wrong with special occasion foods, as long as every day is not a special occasion,” Mr. Pollan writes. “Special occasion foods offer some of the great pleasures of life, so we shouldn’t deprive ourselves of them, but the sense of occasion needs to be restored.”

Here is where I can make an improvement. Ice cream has been a lifelong passion, and even though I stick to a brand lower in fat and calories than most, and limit my portion to the half-cup serving size described on the container, I indulge in this treat almost nightly. Perhaps I’ll try the so-called S policy Mr. Pollan says some people follow: “No snacks, no seconds, no sweets — except on days that begin with the letter S.”

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

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Registered: 12-07-2003
Fri, 02-05-2010 - 9:00am
Despite my love of corn chips, I have read all of Michael Pollan's books (except this new one). I love him and can't wait to read Food Rules. I've eliminated most of the processed food we used to eat, but I think I need to concentrate on fewer snacks and more deliberate eating (i.e. at a table). I just signed up for a CSA for spring-- a full share this time, so we are going to have a TON of veggies and will hopefully be getting a quarter of a locally pastured beef sometime this weekend or next week (stupid snow!).
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 02-05-2010 - 9:12am

It's funny because as kids, we always ate at the table. After school and for breakfast at a table in the kitchen, and for all other meals in the dining room. The dining room was extremely INformal, but every night the table would be set properly etc.

With dd I always did the same, and I remember many friends over the years who thought this was somehow mean or overly strict. But it works for us, and even now, when she makes herself a snack, she puts it on a plate, then goes to sit down at the table.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

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Registered: 12-07-2003
Fri, 02-05-2010 - 9:39am
We always (well, almost always) eat dinner at the table, but we all tend to eat breakfast and lunch elsewhere. DH is actually better at eating at the table for lunch than I am. I like eating breakfast in front of the computer. When I was a kid, I ate most things at the table, because my mom had a strict no food outside of the kitchen rule for me and my sister. We didn't usually have strict mealtimes, and once I could make stuff for myself I was pretty much on my own for breakfast and lunch. I'm kind of toying with the idea of talking to DH about having more formal mealtimes. Really cooking something for breakfast each morning and for lunch. It wouldn't work quite as well for days I'm working, but on the weekends at least we could sit down and eat together.
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Registered: 08-22-2009
Fri, 02-05-2010 - 9:50am

When the kids were young we ate all of our meals at the table. As they got older and started making their own breakfasts and lunches we got more lax with those meals but dinner was always at the table.

Since our nest has emptied out even dinner at the table has become a rare event but something we are working on getting back in the habit of doing.

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Registered: 12-01-2009
Fri, 02-05-2010 - 9:56am

I get where he's coming from intellectually


but he's taking all the fun out of food...

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 02-05-2010 - 9:59am
Breakfasts tend to be pretty haphazard around here too. In that department, my biggest victory has been to get dh to eat one at all. It took me 15 years to convince him that he would eat and feel better overall, if he started the day with some kind of halfway decent breakfast.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

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Fri, 02-05-2010 - 10:02am
LOL, that all depends how you look at it. My brother and I always have lots of fun cooking together, sharing recipes, talking about food, eating food etc. All the same, we cook stuff that even Pollan would probably OK for the most part. My brother is very fond of his ice cream machine, though, and uses it quite often ;).

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

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Registered: 08-22-2009
Fri, 02-05-2010 - 10:17am
Although I am still a work in progress I have been trying to eat more healthily (with the emphasis in closer to nature) for the last few years. Getting a bit better every year. One thing that makes me proud is knocking 30 points off my cholesterol over the last year on diet alone. Unfortunately 30 points was not enough (still have that gene pool to content with). So last month I also started on drugs. But I am on the lowest does of drug and hope to never have to go to a higher dosage.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Fri, 02-05-2010 - 10:21am
That's really excellent. Many of my Greek friends have genetic problems with cholesterol as well. One of them found that the only way he could keep his numbers in check was to walk for several hours daily, which is probably what his grandpas did every day just to get around.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

Avatar for mommy2amani
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 02-05-2010 - 10:36am

<“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” >


I like that.

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