Teenagers working

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Teenagers working
32
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 12:16pm

Scenario:

Teenager is two months from turning 14. All on his own, he's started helping out at a local agricultural type business doing things like filling bags. It's his best friend's family business and the best friend helps out in the same way - long tradition in this rural community though the child in question is not part of that family. He has helped out here and there in the past, very infrequently. Now that school is out he is getting himself up early Saturday, showering, eating breakfast and heading over to the business to help out with his friend, showing a great deal of initiative, and responsibility. Teen works from 4-6 hours one day a week and is paid cash, and one other local kid does this with them, then they all come back to the teens house to swim, ride bikes and hang out so there is a social aspect to this (he's working with his friends for a while, then taking it easy with his friends the rest of the day). He's not obligated to work, if he has other plans and doesn't feel like he doesn't need to go over there, he's only going because he wants to (this is the parents observation as the child does not always go when something more interesting comes up).

State law says no child under 14 years old can work, a child over 14 years old can work as long as it's not a school day and no more than 4 hours per day, with a permit. Obviously the state is not keen on people being paid under the table.

Do you think a tradition of children working on farms and in agricultural businesses say, one 6-hour day a week in the summers is bad in general, bad only because it's against a state law, or not bad at all? Would you intervene and tell the child he can't do it anymore?

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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Edited 7/2/2010 1:07 pm ET by harmony08
"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 3:20pm
My children have been taught since birth that when they get money they have to save some and share some as well as spend some. They currently tithe and put another ten percent of any income into their personal savings accounts, where they clear "big expenses" with me. The older one currently uses his savings to pay for his car insurance every six months and the younger one is saving for a laptop. But his is a tight-fisted little guy and usually when he gets 500 dollars he wants to open a CD for the higher savings rate rather than spend it.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 3:25pm
That's great. Our kids save and all have savings accounts, but it's not that structured where they have to save something of everything they earn. I think both ways can be effective.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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Ten Rules for Being Human


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"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 4:22pm

since birth and starting it first ourselves ( we still make month contriubtions a/w quarterly contriubtions to an investment each has ) we've taught them that a portion of money they get for special occassions like birthdays, christmas goes into the bank adn a portion they can have for spending too.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 4:35pm

well, she wants to be a veternarian so if later on she decides that's what she really wants and is determined,

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-12-2004
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 4:40pm

State law says no child under 14 years old can work, a child over 14 years old can work as long as it's not a school day and no more than 4 hours per day, with a permit. Obviously the state is not keen on people being paid under the table.


Do you think a tradition of children working on farms and in agricultural businesses say, one 6-hour day a week in the summers is bad in general, bad only because it's against a state law, or not bad at all? Would you intervene and tell the child he can't do it anymore?


I don't see anything wrong with teenagers working, esp. if it is the kid who is initiating the work, even if he is only 13 (apparently almost 14).

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 4:42pm
I think this is both healthy and legal. I don't see this as any different from a girl who babysits a lot for the neighbors. He's not an employee.











iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 5:21pm

In many states, there are exemptions for agricultural work, so check to make sure before assuming it's illegal. And I'm not sure it's the same as being paid under the table, either, unless babysitting is also considered the same way. DD occasionally had a long babysitting gig before she was 14. These types of jobs may be exempt.


I'd check if I were you.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2010
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 11:00am

I had

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 4:53pm

I don't think I'd let my teens do this. It is a business, not private work like babysitting, mowing lawns, washing cars. Businesses paying workers under the table is not something I want to teach my teens is acceptble, but as a small business owner I may be taking a harsher stand than most.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Sat, 07-03-2010 - 5:00pm
You were right. The link I had originally listed one exception, it wasn't babysitting or farming, but I tracked down the actual law and there is an exception for farmers as long as it's not a company and the farmer is the one hiring the teen (I guess then it's more like a parent hiring a babysitter). Which is good, because he worked way longer than 6 hours yesterday (again, his choice). He earned $142 and put $100 in savings (nobody asked him to, this was what he decided). He isn't paid by the hour, he's paid by the bale, which I did not know either (I thought it was by the hour before). So I guess as far as I can tell now it's legal, though I have to check more on the number of hours if there's a limit with farmers, I couldn't tell from my glancing at it yesterday and then I got interrupted and hadn't gotten back to it.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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Ten Rules for Being Human


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"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink