Teenagers working

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Teenagers working
32
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 12:16pm

Scenario:

Teenager is two months from turning 14. All on his own, he's started helping out at a local agricultural type business doing things like filling bags. It's his best friend's family business and the best friend helps out in the same way - long tradition in this rural community though the child in question is not part of that family. He has helped out here and there in the past, very infrequently. Now that school is out he is getting himself up early Saturday, showering, eating breakfast and heading over to the business to help out with his friend, showing a great deal of initiative, and responsibility. Teen works from 4-6 hours one day a week and is paid cash, and one other local kid does this with them, then they all come back to the teens house to swim, ride bikes and hang out so there is a social aspect to this (he's working with his friends for a while, then taking it easy with his friends the rest of the day). He's not obligated to work, if he has other plans and doesn't feel like he doesn't need to go over there, he's only going because he wants to (this is the parents observation as the child does not always go when something more interesting comes up).

State law says no child under 14 years old can work, a child over 14 years old can work as long as it's not a school day and no more than 4 hours per day, with a permit. Obviously the state is not keen on people being paid under the table.

Do you think a tradition of children working on farms and in agricultural businesses say, one 6-hour day a week in the summers is bad in general, bad only because it's against a state law, or not bad at all? Would you intervene and tell the child he can't do it anymore?

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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Edited 7/2/2010 1:07 pm ET by harmony08
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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 12:48pm
6 hours one day a week sounds better than 4 hours a day/5 days a week to me..but

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 1:02pm
I don't think it's bad for kids to work, period. No, I don't think they should be working 12 hours a day in a sweatshop or something, but I have nothing against kids having jobs and learning how to earn, save, and spend money. My younger one has had some kind of job or business going since he was about ten. The older one has little initiative and only works when someone approaches him about a job to do.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-10-2009
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 1:16pm
I thought farms and family businesses were exempt from this regulation.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 1:41pm
I have the impression a farmer might be able to have his own children working there, but not hire other people's children, not legally. But from the child's perspective this probably feels just like babysitting or mowing the lawn, shoveling or other tasks he's done that he's sometimes paid to do.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 1:50pm
I don't see a problem with it.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 2:04pm

IME, there are usually exemptions to those rules....is there a farm exemption?


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 2:11pm

I found this...


http://www.stopchildlabor.org/USchildlabor/fact1.htm


Minimum Age for Non-hazardous Work


In jobs that are not considered particularly hazardous, the FLSA sets the normal minimum age for employment in agriculture at 14 years, whereas in every other industry the normal minimum age is 16 years.


In agriculture there are three exceptions to the normal age 14 minimum age:


(1)

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 2:25pm
i don't mean to hijack the thread esp if the OP isn't going there but about a job teaching a kid how to save, spend money..my kid is dying for her own horse, at dinner the other night she asked how much she had in her savings, we told her a few thousand in the bank alone, her eyes lit up and she said gee, i could buy a horse with that, um, no..do you think when she has her own job she should be allowed to buy a horse with her own earnings?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 2:52pm
Well, it's not just buying a horse, it is boarding the horse, vet care for the horse, buying tack for the horse and all the other expenses involved, which are ongoing expenses. I didn't get horses for my kids when they wanted them because I didn't think they could afford all that on an ongoing basis, and I didn't want to assume the expense. I guess it would be a decision to be made among you, your husband, and your daughter. But it's not like a car; if my kid wanted a car and couldn't pay for gas and insurance the car could sit in the driveway until he could afford to pay the costs associated with driving it. A horse needs to eat and have medical care all the time.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Fri, 07-02-2010 - 3:09pm

I wouldn't for the same reasons bordwithyou stated. It's not just the purchase but the ongoing expense. I don't think I'd ever agree with any of our kids owning horses, it's just too much money for an activity.

I think the money kids earn is mostly theirs to spend. In the OP situation the child doesn't seem to be saving for anything specifically, probably going to use the money for pizza with his friend and paintball supplies.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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Ten Rules for Being Human


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"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink

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