Thanksgiviing Plans

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thanksgiviing Plans
169
Sun, 11-13-2011 - 6:45am

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 3:29pm

My whole world is a buffet.





Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 3:36pm
Thing is, when you ask "What can I bring?" and the hostess says "nothing", then she means NOTHING. By bringing a dessert (or anything else that isn't a hostess gift or thank you), then you're not listening to your hostess. Or assuming she's not being honest. Neither are good.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 3:36pm
HA!

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 3:51pm

My DH finds it amusing, too.





iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 4:15pm

HA! I've never seen that, thanks for sharing.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 4:16pm
puss_boo_kay wrote:

Ha!

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 4:19pm

HERE is the video version. Enjoy!

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 4:38pm

can i come to your next dinner party?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 4:51pm

Here's Miss Manners on the issue:

One might suppose that Miss Manners would be charmed by the generosity of the Gentle Reader who writes, "I hate it when someone says, 'Don't bring anything' to a get-together. Is it better to honor their request, or to bring something small anyway? And if I should bring it anyway (never arrive empty-handed), do you have any suggestions?"

No, and she is not all that charmed, either. If she were not terminally polite, she would reply, "Do you apply that principle to all aspects of your social life -- that No means Yes?"

The notion that a guest should not arrive at a dinner party "empty-handed" caught on in America only comparatively recently. The European idea from which it evolved has to do with bringing flowers or chocolates -- never wine, which carries the insulting implication that something decent to drink is needed because the host's wine is likely to be inferior. And certainly not dinner.

But here the custom got mixed up with the jolly American tradition of cooperative meals -- picnics, covered-dish suppers, family reunions and improvised parties by students. Nothing wrong with those, as long as everyone understands the deal.

Now guests entering a gala dinner party look as if they are in the express line at the grocery store, each carrying one item.

Some hosts love this. Counting it as less work, they forget that they are obliged to work off the debt and will never be free to visit others without pots sloshing away on their laps.

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 5:03pm
I puffy <3 you!

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

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