Thanksgiviing Plans

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thanksgiviing Plans
169
Sun, 11-13-2011 - 6:45am

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 7:26pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 7:35pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 7:36pm

Nah

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 7:55pm
We have informal get togethers all the time where close friends/family get together and we all contribute. I think that is different from a formal dinner party.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 7:59pm
I like the idea of brings flowers, chocolates, pretty notecards, wine, some little trinket. Not food to complement the host's offerings. Sometimes over the holidays I will bring a tray of homemade cookies, but I always specify, "That is for your family, later."
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 9:10pm
I agree. There is definitely a difference b/w a dinner party and a casual potluck. It seems like more and more people are hosting potlucks, at least in my social circle, so it's possibly starting to confuse people about the nature of the invitation. Prior to having kids, we hosted and were invited to a lot more dinner parties than now. Typically nowadays, we'll get invited to casual potlucks that include kids. I haven't thrown a true dinner party in a while, but even when I have more casual gatherings, I typically tell people they don't need to bring anything b/c I feel like if I'm inviting them, I should be providing all the food and drink! That's just how I was raised.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Mon, 11-14-2011 - 11:25pm

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There might be a subtle but important difference in wording down here.





Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 3:32am

I can't imagine people showing up with food in either instance. I would definitely find it odd/rude.

Old-fashioned Greeks have the habit of bringing sweets when invited out, and the host is expected to serve them. The result is that the dessert course can consist of 3-4 mismatched, inedible sweets. You either ask guests which sweet they want or serve them a little of each on the same plate. But in the beginning I found it incredibly strange, quite rude and it still bugs me sometimes.

OTOH, I disagree with Miss Manners about wine. IMO, it is perfectly fine to bring wine, and it is not brought to be consumed that evening, but for the host to consume at his/her leisure. Sometimes I will bring cognac or whisky instead as a hostess gift. It is usually appreciated.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 7:59am

every one of those points i can relate to... we hosted a couple grill outs last summer and

 

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 8:48am
My translation of #2 is, "don't bring anything." In that case, I would usually bring a bottle of wine or some god beer. But now you have me wondering if I'm missing something when my mil says, "you don't need to bring anything." It took me a long time to figure out that when she invites you over at 1, that means the food will be on the table at 12:55.

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