Thanksgiviing Plans

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thanksgiviing Plans
169
Sun, 11-13-2011 - 6:45am

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 9:06am
OMG! The food is on the table early???? In my family, if someone invites you over at 1, it means they were planning to have dinner on the table at 1:30, and it will actually be on the table at around 2.
Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 9:07am
I think hostess gifts are fine - to include wine or chocolate or what have you - and shouldn't be expected to be consumed at the event. That's why I've recently taken to giving the hostess gift AFTER the party ...

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 9:11am
In France if you are, for instance, living in Paris, and you travel somewhere, say to Normandy, you are almost expected to bring back some regional food specialty gift items to share with your Parisian friends. That made sense a hundred years ago, but nowadays, you can get. Camenbert or caramels from d'Issy or pear cider from Domfront at supermarkets anywhere in Paris. Nonetheless, the tradition lives on....
Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 9:14am
Yep! In my family, if you're invited for 1, that means you'll be eating at 2, after an hour of socializing. It took me a while to catch on to being there early for a 1:00 invitation. Of course, in my family, nobody has "dinner" at 1p.m., so it took me a while to figure out that being invited to "dinner" meant in the afternoon.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 9:26am

that's normal for my family, Lol.

 

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 9:48am
usually, even for an informal gathering, I state that ahead of time. "Why don't you come over at 6, and we'll plan to eat around 7." Or "cocktails at 7. Dinner served at 8." etc.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 9:57am

<>

That's bringing something.





iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 10:00am
bordwithyou wrote:
In France if you are, for instance, living in Paris, and you travel somewhere, say to Normandy, you are almost expected to bring back some regional food specialty gift items to share with your Parisian friends. That made sense a hundred years ago, but nowadays, you can get. Camenbert or caramels from d'Issy or pear cider from Domfront at supermarkets anywhere in Paris. Nonetheless, the tradition lives on....

Well, even if you can get all that stuff in Paris now, it's still a better tradition than bringing everyone a novelty keychain ;)

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Kitty

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Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 10:14am
Well, I agree with bord that it's awkward when people bring unexpected food to a dinner party because it may not go with what you've already planned. I don't feel the same way about wine--my guests usually have better taste than I do when it comes to wine anyway.;) I would feel funny bringing over a casserole when I was just stopping by for a visit, but I get that in your circle, it's what people do. I'd rather have chocolate than a casserole though.;)
Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 11-15-2011 - 10:16am
Yeah, that would make it easier. I find people here just say, come at 6, and it's assumed there will be a cocktail hour first. My in-laws don't drink, and having appetizers seems to be taboo, so that's probably part of the reason it's different for them.

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