Thrifty Thursday

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Thrifty Thursday
149
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 10:03am

1. What is one thing you will spend money on? One thing that you won't?

2. Retirement money-I was watching Suze Orman the other night (don't really care for her lol) and she does a segment of "How well am I doing" and there was a 38 year old woman, married with 3 kids and she gave her a low grade. She had about $100,000 in her retirement fund and she said at her age, that was too low. Is there a goal (no need to put $ amounts down as I know that is a very personal thing) you have by a certain age or goals you had by certain ages and do you think that amount is good or bad for that age?

3. Weekend plans?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 8:38pm

bordwithyou wrote:
Well, I don't like spending money where I don't need to, either. But when my kid was growing up, I pretty much knew he would lose coats, hats, gloves, etc. I learned it was a lot easier to say, buy three pairs of identical gloves at the beginning of the season and hope you had at least one intact pair at the end rather than buy three pairs that are different and end up with one of each. I learned to request email copies of school handouts if they weren't also posted on the web. I learned you can get perfectly nice winter coats for five dollars at Salvation Army, and I was much less upset at a lost five dollar coat than a lost $45 dollar one. I also learned my kid felt like crap when he "messed up," and any negative reaction I had to him messing up only made him feel worse. I learned that it was just as cruel to punish a kid with no working memory for forgetting stuff as it would be to punish a kid who had dyslexia for misunderstanding written directions from time to time. Yes, you have to deal with the consequences of your limitations, and replace stuff you lost. But you don't have to take snotty attitudes from people about those limitations without speaking up.

Exactly bord, exactly.  Really, it's just stuff and as I said earlier those who live with kids/adults with adhd learn to cope and manage, sometimes better than others.  I'm thankful that I have a great support system of moms who have bt/dt and don't judge.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 8:39pm

<<As I said," You didn't.  I got the impression that it is for Spring's daughter.   Why? Probably because she did not follow up with a consequence as you did when explaining how your son makes good on lost objects."  >>

What exactly do you think should have happened because clearly you aren't happy with the situation,

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 8:40pm

turtleemom wrote:
<p>From your comments I assume your son has more going on than just ADHD.  Obviously I have hit a hot spot.  I apologize for offending you which was not my intention. </p><p>My orignial comments were to Spring and her daughter and her ADHD.  My guess is that your son's dx are not the same as hers   As I am sure you know, ADHD does not maninfest the same in every child nor does it .  Not all parents respond to the ADHD the same way.  Some do see it as an excuse for poor behavior.  I am not saying that Spring does, but I was wondering.</p><p>Other than apologize for hitting one of your buttons, there is nothing I can do.  You can move on or stay miffed.  It is up to you.</p>

Who are you talking to and why on earth do you think you can diagnois from what is said on an internet debate board.  You might try to have a genuine apology instead of making excuses...

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 8:41pm

bordwithyou wrote:
Crap, Turtlenom, you don't stop with the assumptions, do you? Of course my son had more going on than "just" ADHD. He's like everybody else, a whole human being with strengths, weaknesses, gifts, talents, whatever. He's not a walking diagnosis. And the problem isn't that you "hit one of my hot spots." The problem is that you asked a bunch of snotty, rude questions about a kid with memory problems. Your questions implied irresponsibility/disrespect on the kids' part, rather than a disability.

Well said.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 8:46pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px">What's her consequence for losing your shoes? </span></p><p><span style="font-size:small"><strong><span>Well since the year is not up yet and I am thinking they are in either her regular or gym locker, I will have to figure that out at the end of the school year.</span></strong></span></p>

I do find it amazing as to what comes up at the end of the school year.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 9:16pm

I do find it amazing as to what comes up at the end of the school year.

Yep.

Avatar for turtleemom
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-25-2007
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 9:39pm

I'm not teaching other people's children. I'm not saying I am qualified to teach other people's children.  I'm responsible for the education of my child only.  I know his strengths and weaknesses and learning style.  When you turn your child over to others to be educated I would think there would be the expectation that the teachers have similar backgrounds.  When my son takes a class outside the home, I am aware of the degrees or practical experience (as in the EMT that taught the personal safety class) of the teachers.   

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 10:05pm
Turtleemom, you make sending a kid to school sound like sending a sweater out to be dry cleaned. I used schools to help educate my kids, but I never turned their education over to others.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 10:14pm

turtleemom wrote:
<p>I'm not teaching other people's children. I'm not saying I am qualified to teach other people's children.  I'm responsible for the education of my child only.  I know his strengths and weaknesses and learning style.  When you turn your child over to others to be educated I would think there would be the expectation that the teachers have similar backgrounds.  When my son takes a class outside the home, I am aware of the degrees or practical experience (as in the EMT that taught the personal safety class) of the teachers.   </p>

Well, I'm responsible for the education of my children, know their strengths, weaknesses and learning style...do you find that unique or something?  While I may use traditional school (because I have that standard of qualifications) in no way am I "turning my child over", lol.  What a strange choice of words, do you feel that way with the variety of subjects that you don't teach your child?  Or do you feel that way since you use someone else's curriculum, a co-op and outside instructors to teach?  

I find it unusual that you are not willing to maintain the standard that you expect of others.  

PumpkinAngel

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 3:12am
"Turtleemom, you make sending a kid to school sound like sending a sweater out to be dry cleaned. I used schools to help educate my kids, but I never turned their education over to others." ------------ Ditto. I did seriously consider homeschooling a few times, but there were some distinct advantages to the school setting for my child. Instead I looked for a school that would teach the stuff I did not feel like teaching myself, or that I did not feel I would do a good job teaching (given my kid's personality). But "school" was just one part of teaching my kid.

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