Thrifty Thursday

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Thrifty Thursday
149
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 10:03am

1. What is one thing you will spend money on? One thing that you won't?

2. Retirement money-I was watching Suze Orman the other night (don't really care for her lol) and she does a segment of "How well am I doing" and there was a 38 year old woman, married with 3 kids and she gave her a low grade. She had about $100,000 in her retirement fund and she said at her age, that was too low. Is there a goal (no need to put $ amounts down as I know that is a very personal thing) you have by a certain age or goals you had by certain ages and do you think that amount is good or bad for that age?

3. Weekend plans?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 10:51am

bordwithyou wrote:
Turtleemom, you make sending a kid to school sound like sending a sweater out to be dry cleaned. I used schools to help educate my kids, but I never turned their education over to others.

Yep.  There are a wide range of options in education and I think that I've used most of the ones available to me here.  Education is important, how not so much.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 10:37am

turtleemom wrote:
<p>No, I don't find it unique that parents would know their child's strengths, weaknesses and learning styles.    What I find unique in my situation that does not happen in a school is that I can pick and choose curriculum to meet each of his needs. If something isn't working,  I can change it in the matter of time it takes for me to do research and for the new order to get shipped-within a week.  O mor ethan one occassion I ahve contacte the curriuclum develper or publiher for clarification before purchasing  A school teacher can not just stop teaching the district's curriculum because a few students would be better served by a change (at least in my district).  I can say your needs are better served by the community college for science, but yo uget middle schoo lcredit for it.   I can also change scheduling to fit it all in. There is no confilct of class times or classes being filled.  We can school in the evening and have the day free or take Monday and Tuesday off and work on the weekend.  That is unique.   </p><p>When I outsource a class, I do know the curriuclum being used, the teacher's qualifications, and have  met with the instructor ahead of time and we often times we have sat in on a class. There are so many class opportunites available but there is only so much time.  I don't want him to be in class that isn't meeting his needs because it is a waste of his time and mine. </p><p>Back to subs and teaching degrees...  In a school setting, I would expect the teachers and subs to have had classes on following IEPS, and 504s. classroom management, classroom differentiation, and a myriad of other things that multi children classroom teachers need to know.  I would expect a sub to be able to step in for the teacher and have a similar knowlege base of classroom management.  I appreciate Jams explaining that in her district a long term sub would, but a sub for a day may not.  </p>

Well you certainly phrased is as you thought it was unique to yourself and situation, which seemed to be your basis as to why your standards were lower than what you expected of a public school.  You seem to think that parents who use traditional school are bound by many restrictions, I have not found this to be true, ime and my children are in high school currently.  When I outsource my children's education (and well, really anything else) I research quite well before I enroll my child, again this is not unique.  You are in a school setting, as you say you are a private school, where the qualifications and standards are lower than what you expect in a public school. 

Honestly, I would expect anyone who homeschools to have a teaching degree because after all, they are the primary source of education for their child and I find it fascinating that a homeschool teacher would not have a teaching degree.  I do know many homeschoolers and they all have teaching degrees. I have pretty high standards for the education of my children and I am not qualified by those standard to be the primary teacher of my children.  I (and dh) do and have over the years supplemented the education in many of the ways you described earlier in your listing of curriculum.  

PumpkinAngel

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 10:25am

geschichtsgal wrote:
When I hear someone is "working for retirement," to me that means they are primarily working to save for retirement-- not that they are getting a retirement benefit from working.  Or have I misunderstood what you mean? </p>

I can see that, but in the context of this discussion, working for the retirement benefits themselves was pretty apparent, imo.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for turtleemom
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-25-2007
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 9:42am

No, I don't find it unique that parents would know their child's strengths, weaknesses and learning styles.    What I find unique in my situation that does not happen in a school is that I can pick and choose curriculum to meet each of his needs. If something isn't working,  I can change it in the matter of time it takes for me to do research and for the new order to get shipped-within a week.  O mor ethan one occassion I ahve contacte the curriuclum develper or publiher for clarification before purchasing  A school teacher can not just stop teaching the district's curriculum because a few students would be better served by a change (at least in my district).  I can say your needs are better served by the community college for science, but yo uget middle schoo lcredit for it.   I can also change scheduling to fit it all in. There is no confilct of class times or classes being filled.  We can school in the evening and have the day free or take Monday and Tuesday off and work on the weekend.  That is unique.   

When I outsource a class, I do know the curriuclum being used, the teacher's qualifications, and have  met with the instructor ahead of time and we often times we have sat in on a class. There are so many class opportunites available but there is only so much time.  I don't want him to be in class that isn't meeting his needs because it is a waste of his time and mine. 

Back to subs and teaching degrees...  In a school setting, I would expect the teachers and subs to have had classes on following IEPS, and 504s. classroom management, classroom differentiation, and a myriad of other things that multi children classroom teachers need to know.  I would expect a sub to be able to step in for the teacher and have a similar knowlege base of classroom management.  I appreciate Jams explaining that in her district a long term sub would, but a sub for a day may not.  

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 9:38am

savcal2011 wrote:
OH, but that, imo, is different. She's owrking for the pay - but using it as a retirement fund. I was answering the question as if they were only working for the retirement benefit (pension, 401k, matching plans, etc)

When I hear someone is "working for retirement," to me that means they are primarily working to save for retirement-- not that they are getting a retirement benefit from working.  Or have I misunderstood what you mean? 

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 9:03am

jamblessedthree wrote:
When the quotes become 1/2 a page long they just look like scrambled words on a page.  This one, Not so much, Lol. </p>

that's why I usually delete all the preceding quotes and leave only the last quote - the one I'm replying to. The Delete and Backspace keys and highlight function are great for that.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 9:02am

geschichtsgal wrote:
blockquote></p><p>I do know one woman, who at least the rumor mill says is working only for retirement.  They live off of her husband's salary and she puts her entire paycheck into retirement.</p>

OH, but that, imo, is different. She's owrking for the pay - but using it as a retirement fund. I was answering the question as if they were only working for the retirement benefit (pension, 401k, matching plans, etc)

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 9:01am

jamblessedthree wrote:
What would "other" mean?  Some work for only the pay and benefits, Retirement is a benefit right? </p>

Other might mean free tuition for oneself, or for one's kids.  Yes, retirement is a benefit, but I've not known someone who was working only for the retirement benefit.

And really "Some work for only the pay and benefits" -- ummm, almost everyone works for the pay ...

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 5:57am

I know schools (here anyway!) do call from a poll of certified teacher subs for long term assignments (that require a teacher replacement for more than a few weeks - months), That does have to do with nclb compliance.

A sub that fills in for one day here or there is not going to pick up on students strengths and weaknesses the way the normal educator can.

 


 


Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 05-03-2013 - 3:12am
"Turtleemom, you make sending a kid to school sound like sending a sweater out to be dry cleaned. I used schools to help educate my kids, but I never turned their education over to others." ------------ Ditto. I did seriously consider homeschooling a few times, but there were some distinct advantages to the school setting for my child. Instead I looked for a school that would teach the stuff I did not feel like teaching myself, or that I did not feel I would do a good job teaching (given my kid's personality). But "school" was just one part of teaching my kid.

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