Thrifty Thursday

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Thrifty Thursday
149
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 10:03am

1. What is one thing you will spend money on? One thing that you won't?

2. Retirement money-I was watching Suze Orman the other night (don't really care for her lol) and she does a segment of "How well am I doing" and there was a 38 year old woman, married with 3 kids and she gave her a low grade. She had about $100,000 in her retirement fund and she said at her age, that was too low. Is there a goal (no need to put $ amounts down as I know that is a very personal thing) you have by a certain age or goals you had by certain ages and do you think that amount is good or bad for that age?

3. Weekend plans?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:20pm

turtleemom wrote:
<p>No, but I do not need one to teach at a private school in IL which is what we are classified as.  I had no idea that substitues do not need teaching degrees.  I thought for a state funded institution, teaching staff and sunstitues would have teaching degrees.  </p>

Nope and if you don't need one, why do you think someone that substitutes needs one?  The substitute is following a plan laid out by a degreed teacher, but you are teaching.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:17pm

geschichtsgal wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">savcal2011</em> wrote:</div>Health insurance and other, yes. But retirement? No.</blockquote></p><p>I do know one woman, who at least the rumor mill says is working only for retirement.  They live off of her husband's salary and she puts her entire paycheck into retirement.</p>

Now that's a good point, I hadn't thought of that and I could see doing that in a few years when the kids are in college or after.  But it wouldn't be the only reason I worked, I enjoy working.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:15pm

turtleemom wrote:
<p>No, but I do not need one to teach at a private school in IL which is what we are classified as.  I had no idea that substitues do not need teaching degrees.  I thought for a state funded institution, teaching staff and sunstitues would have teaching degrees.  </p>

Depends on the state, but in my state, subs only need the equivalent of an associates degree. I subbed as an undergrad.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:14pm
You're right chestnut, University benefits are awesome for some! My friend works at Colgate U, She said something about free tuition for her kid if she stays there 7 years which I think is fantastic!

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:13pm

pumpkinangel wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">turtleemom</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;You orginally put borrowed in quotes as if to imply she took them without permission.  Why doesn't she wear her own shoes for track and gym? How do you lose shoes? DId she come home barefoot that day? &lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Does she turn in homeworK?  Does she remember things to do with her friends?  Is she just forgetful when it comes to you?    If her ADHD is under control wouldn't she not be forgetting things? &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I don't know that adhd can ever be fully under control, kids/adults learn to manage and cope, sometimes better than others.  Those who live with kids/adults who have adhd also learn to manage and cope, sometimes better than others. The most important thing I have found is to be consistent with consquences and structure, it would be easier to do things for them but that is not always the best thing.</p>

This. This is exactly what I try to do. With both of them. And their parents. ;) Bc going thru the diagnosis process w/DH and doing the research once he got his diagnosis made me realize that DH & I both would likely qualify for DXs today. One of my very favorite former advisees has ADHD. I can always tell when she skips her meds. She's a perfectly well functioning adult, in grad school now, doing a fellowship. You learn to cope. But it never "goes away." Or is cured. You learn to function in spite of it. And hopefully, you harness the good parts (multitasking/creativity) for your advantage.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:13pm

turtleemom wrote:
<p>As a mom of a kid who has co-morbid Aspergers/ADHD, I am familiar with atypical neurological behavior.  I do not see ADHD as an excuse or get out of jail free card.  Kids need to learn how to cope and find ways to keep track of their things.  Spring said it is under control.  To me that means coping mechanisms are being used.  If she is constantly forgetting things (which is the impression I got), I wonder how it is under control. </p>

Nobody said anything about a "get out of jail free" card.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:12pm

savcal2011 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>These quote features are pointless.</blockquote></p><p>On the mobile app, yes. On the regular interwebz? I have no problem with the quote feature. Works extremely well for me.</p>

When the quotes become 1/2 a page long they just look like scrambled words on a page.  This one, Not so much, Lol. 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:12pm

<What would "other" mean?  Some work for only the pay and benefits, Retirement is a benefit right?>

I had a friend who loved to travel and he worked for an airline. Free airline travel was a perq for him.

I have many friends who work for universities and their children can attend for low or no cost. That's a wonderful "other" benefit.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:12pm

geschichtsgal wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">savcal2011</em> wrote:</div>Health insurance and other, yes. But retirement? No.</blockquote></p><p>I do know one woman, who at least the rumor mill says is working only for retirement.  They live off of her husband's salary and she puts her entire paycheck into retirement.</p>

I did that for years.  But that doesn't mean I was working "only for retirement."

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 05-02-2013 - 6:12pm

<<

savcal2011 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">springfever2013</em> wrote:</div>You have never known someone who was working only for the benefits?&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>Health insurance and other, yes. But retirement? No.</p>

What would "other" mean?  Some work for only the pay and benefits, Retirement is a benefit right? >>

Except of course you were specific with a single benefit, retirement...not benefits in general.  There are many other benefits to working, perks or beanies so to speak.  I have never known anyone to work only for retirement, which was your original comment and not this new and different comment.

PumpkinAngel

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