Throw Back Thursday

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Throw Back Thursday
37
Thu, 04-24-2014 - 8:39am

Or has my kids call it, TBT Lol. 

What favorite memory do you have about childhood?

Did you have a job in high school?

What dreams did you have as a child and are you living them now?

 

 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 2:13pm

That is correct, Pumpkin. And the rest of the saying "...and don't let the bed bugs bite" is now a renewed concern. Every time I go to a hotel, I check the bed bug registry after hearing about a friend's horrible infestation.

http://www.bedbugregistry.com/

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 2:10pm

Jam, I'll bet that 3/4 bed was once a rope bed. My parents had one also, supported with slats, but it had been a rope bed at one point. They had to have a mattress custom made for it since modern mattresses didn't fit. DH and I used to get that bed when we visited and I always complained about the miserable mattress. My mom's classic reply: "I've had that mattress for 50 years and it has never given me any trouble, which is more than I can say for some of my children."

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 1:33pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">emptynester2009</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;In early American beds the mattress supports were rope also.  &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>DH inherited his grandfather or great grandfather's bed, it's as old as the 1800s or early 1900s and they call it a 3/4 bed.  The middle or inside is open or hollow, theyd support the 'mattress' with slats.  I've actually never heard of rope support, interesting.</p>

If I remember correctly it's actually where the phrase, "Good night, sleep tight" originated.  The ropes needed to be tight in order to have a comfortable sleep....so, Good night, sleep tight.

PumpkinAngel

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 12:05pm

emptynester2009 wrote:
<p>In early American beds the mattress supports were rope also.  </p>

DH inherited his grandfather or great grandfather's bed, it's as old as the 1800s or early 1900s and they call it a 3/4 bed.  The middle or inside is open or hollow, theyd support the 'mattress' with slats.  I've actually never heard of rope support, interesting.

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 9:08am

emptynester2009 wrote:
<p>In early American beds the mattress supports were rope also.  </p>

We have an antique bed that had a rope support.

PumpkinAngel

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 8:55am
"In early American beds the mattress supports were rope also." ------- It makes sense, although the American ones were probably not based on Greek models ;)
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Registered: 08-22-2009
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 8:43am

In early American beds the mattress supports were rope also.  

Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 8:33am
"mothers would tether their babies to bed posts with rope so they could get their work done, " ------------ LOL, my childhood may not have been ideal, but we were not tethered with rope. In traditional Indian beds, the support for the mattress is a web made from rope. Interestingly, ancient Greek beds were made the exact same way, so the tradition in India may go back to Alexander's (the Great) days.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 8:30am

rollmops2009 wrote:
<p><span>My dad made the bunk beds my sister and I shared as kids.  They were so cool. </span></p><p><strong><span>My dad built all our beds too. My parents had a traditional Indian bed they had brought back with them (basically 4 posts and rope). I still find the idea of buying a bed in a store slightly strange.</span></strong></p>
. My husband built our boys' bunk beds, too.  He did a lift-type thing with three drawers under the bed and a chest of drawers at one end of the unit.  They boys used that thing until our older son went off to college.  

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 04-25-2014 - 5:31am

rollmops2009 wrote:
<p><span>Do you have sisters rollmops?</span></p><p><strong><span>Yes, but not that I grew up with (much younger). Why do you ask?</span></strong></p>

No reason, Just curious. 

 

 

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