Thursday Three

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thursday Three
33
Thu, 11-21-2013 - 5:39am

Are you a morning person or night owl?

What are your feelings about the stand your ground law? 

Are you a procrastinator or more pro-active?  Does it depend on the situation/issue? 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2013
Thu, 11-21-2013 - 11:45am

The law gained a lot of attention in the Zimmerman case, Makes me wonder where he'd be if there hadn't been that law...

Probably in jail where he belongs as he has really proved what type of person he really is after his case was over.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 11-21-2013 - 11:52am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Are you a morning person or night owl?</p><p>What are your feelings about the stand your ground law? </p><p>Are you a procrastinator or more pro-active?  Does it depend on the situation/issue? </p>

A bit of both, depends on the situation and both.  Yes, it depends on the situation/issue.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 11-21-2013 - 4:23pm

emptynester2009 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;Are you a morning person or night owl?&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;What are your feelings about the stand your ground law? &lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Are you a procrastinator or more pro-active?  Does it depend on the situation/issue? &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>Morning person</p><p>I think that it should apply when one is on one's own property,  their actual ground.  Do not think it should apply in a public situation.</p><p>Depends on the situation. A lot of the time it is determined by whether putting it off would actually make it more work in the long run.  </p>

So if someone is stealing your car parked in your driveway, you have the right to shoot and, if he doesn't heed that warning, the right to kill him?

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 11-21-2013 - 11:40pm

>So if someone is stealing your car parked in your driveway, you have the right to shoot and, if he doesn't heed that warning, the right to kill him?</p>[/quote]

Stand your ground is about bodily injury not things.  If someone is stealing a car and the owner is safe in their house they do not not have the right to kill that person. 

If  someone is in their house and they feel threatened because someone broke in, they do. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 11-22-2013 - 5:46am
Probably in jail where he belongs as he has really proved what type of person he really is after his case was over.
 
These are my thoughts too. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 11-22-2013 - 5:49am

It's really not that simple, Feeling threatened and actually being in harms way are two different things.  SYG does not give you the right to kill someone b/c you "felt" threatened. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 11-22-2013 - 6:05am

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">emptynester2009</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;jamblessedthree&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;Are you a morning person or night owl?&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;What are your feelings about the stand your ground law? &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;Are you a procrastinator or more pro-active?  Does it depend on the situation/issue? &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Morning person&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;<span style="text-decoration:underline"><strong>I think that it should apply when one is on one's own property,  their actual ground.  Do not think it should apply in a public situation.</strong></span>&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;Depends on the situation. A lot of the time it is determined by whether putting it off would actually make it more work in the long run.  &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>So if someone is stealing your car parked in your driveway, you have the right to shoot and, if he doesn't heed that warning, the right to kill him?</p>

And if it applies to our own property why wouldn't it also matter in public?  The law is crazy, I agree thardy. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 11-22-2013 - 6:15am

I am usually more pro-active to get things done and out of the way.

You're welcome to do my Christmas gift wrapping, Lol, That I do put off and put off...

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 11-22-2013 - 6:46am
Gift wrapping is cruelly something I'm good at. I collect coordinated grosgrain, satin, velvet ribbons and bows all year in a limited palette of colors, a well as specialty papers in those colors. I make handcrafted gift tags and save them from year to year. I look forward to seeing those pretty boxes under the tree every year.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Fri, 11-22-2013 - 7:08am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>It's really not that simple, Feeling threatened and actually being in harms way are two different things.  SYG does not give you the right to kill someone b/c you "felt" threatened. </p>

Again  it depends on where that threat it.  In TX   I have never heard of a SYG law  but have heard of "your home is your castle"  laws.  Which basically means that you have a right to defend your home.

There was a case recently in a nearby town.  A young man was lost and walking around in a neighborhood.   A man thought that he was up to no good and shot and kiled him.  He was convicted of murder.  Both because he was not in actual danger,  and because he used excessive force in shooting him many times. So it did not meet the criteria of "your home is your castle" laws.

A few years ago in another town in the area, a young man broke into a house because he heard that there was drugs. there that he intended to steal.  The occupant of the house shot and killed him. He was not convicted of any crime because it did fit the criteria of the "home is your castle' law.  Someone broke into his home, which put him in danger.