Would you hire a hot nanny?

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-21-2003
Would you hire a hot nanny?
418
Mon, 09-29-2003 - 4:45pm
The other thread about being jealous of the nanny reminded me of this. Everyday when I come home from school I pass by the most gorgeous nanny (she looks all of 18), waiting with one of her charges for another one to get off the bus. She's been dressed in shorts up to there and low cut belly shirts. I can't imagine why anyone in their right mind would hire her. I mean, you can trust your husband but still, who needs it? Even if your husband didn't have a wandering eye, I'd hate to have to compare myself to some PYT all the time.

I had a friend who was rather average looking and she hired an absolute knockout of a nanny from Romania. This girl looked like a model, and she also used to run around in a t-shirt and panties.

Is it me, or would this bug anyone else?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-23-2003
Sun, 11-23-2003 - 3:01pm
Ha! I will never hire a nanny either unless it is under those conditions, but if I did....I'd hire an older woman with more "child care experience". Not because I don't trust my husband, I totally do. But a marriage can only with withstand so much temptation. And the same would go in the other direction as well. Much as I might love to hire a hot young pool boy and give him quarters in the pool house, I wouldn't do that either. No matter which partner is in question, why dangle the carrot if you're not 100% ok with your bait getting taken? Trust is important but so is common sense!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 11-23-2003 - 2:36am
Well, she gets child support from the father, most of which goes towards daycare and the rest towards clothing for her son (they grow so fast at that age). she lives with her Mom (her Dad is divorced and lives in Hawaii so living with him isn't an option), which gives her housing and food and gets a small stipend from her dad (who also co-signed on her car) to pay car payments, insurance and gas, as she drives an hour each way to/from school. Her school awarded her a $5K/year scholarship based on her high school GPA, which she must maintain each year in order to receive the next year's award; failure to meet that GPA once will lose her all scholarship money from the school and she's coming up on her final year with the scholarship money secure. She makes up the rest with student loans and a couple of small, locally awarded scholarships.

Basically, she's working VERY hard and tapping all the resources available to her and based on her very hard work, those resources are panning out.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sun, 11-23-2003 - 2:29am
Wow, why bother marrying one, then, if that's all the faith you have in the "breed"? Seems like if you really feel that way about men, what kind of nanny to hire is the LEAST of your concerns.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 11-22-2003 - 11:01pm
>>>.....i'm sorry but you can't trust men - however devoted they seem!

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That's BS. You might not be able to trust your DH, but I most certainly trust mine.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 11-22-2003 - 11:00pm
>>>I'm curious about one thing though, I could never figure out how single moms could afford to attend college and support a child without working? Do her parents help out? Also who watches the baby while she's in school? Do colleges have daycare now? I went in the dark ages when they didn't...

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When I worked in a university, a young woman with a young child (she had him when she was 14) worked for me while attending school full time. Her family didn't live near by & couldn't afford to help her out financially. She attended a high school for pregnant teens, (the school provided in-house day care & time for feeding, bonding, as well as parenting classes). Once in college received some assistance for partial day care tuition through a state work/school program. To receive the money, she needed to attend college at least 12 credits per semester. Plus, she worked approx. 30 hrs/week for me.

The university I worked for did not have an on-site day care, but the university I attended did, it was part of their education department...I think that's pretty common.

It takes a strong, hardworking, and dedicated person to pull it off (which she was). She wanted to make a good life for herself & her son...and through hard work & education, she was on her way.

There have been single moms for a long time who work, go to school, and manage to be good mothers at the same time...even in the "dark ages".

;)


Edited 11/23/2003 1:25:37 AM ET by iomoon

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-22-2003
Sat, 11-22-2003 - 6:27pm
If I ever hired a nanny - which wouldn't happen unless I was famous - she would look like Mrs.doubtfire.....i'm sorry but you can't trust men - however devoted they seem!
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-21-2003
Sat, 11-22-2003 - 3:49pm
Sounds like they've got their act together, good for them.

I'm curious about one thing though, I could never figure out how single moms could afford to attend college and support a child without working? Do her parents help out? Also who watches the baby while she's in school? Do colleges have daycare now? I went in the dark ages when they didn't...

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 11-22-2003 - 3:35pm
They both sound like they've got a lot of pluck. John must get that from his momma. Are they going to be living near you?
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 11-22-2003 - 3:12pm
<>

What a lovely thing to say, thank you!

John is 21, his to-be-fiancee is 6 months older and will be 22 when he pops the big question. They are currently planning their wedding for the summer of 2005.

John has been employed as a network admin for a government contractor since he graduated high school; in fact it was his internship with the federal government, won during the summer before his senior year in high school, that led to his first job as a contractor. He's been regularly promoted, received regular raises and won several bonuses since then (some in the form of company stock, some monetary awards). His company pays most of his tuition costs for his college and the rest he pays for with bowling scholarships that he earns from the tournaments he plays in through the New England and Pennsylvania Junior Bowler's Tour events.

His to-be-fiancee is and has been atttending college full-time since she graduated, with the goal of becoming a high school teacher. Her pregnancy with her son only caused her to lose one semester, so she'll do her student teaching session in the fall of 2004. One of the reasons she wants to work at the high school level is because she believes that her own experience can be helpful to high school girls who become pregnant and believe they will have to drop out or give up their dreams of secondary education--particularly her experience with which agencies to approach for which kinds of assistance. As I mentioned, she managed to continue her education full time, missing out only on the semester her son was born, while carrying a full course load AND while commuting more than an hour each way every day in order to attend a college that met all the requirements she needed (assistance, teacher's college, etc.)

They are planning their early finances with the idea of living on John's income only (which shouldn't be too hard, given he earns more than I do and I'm doing okay) to give her time to find a job in the area and gain some work experience.

John's currently on track with savings to provide a 20% down payment on a house sometime this summer or fall. A family friend of his to-be-fiancee's works as a loan officer for a local bank who specifically works with new buyers through the various first-time buyer programs available in the area including a couple that closely team up FNMA with local banks and she has been advising him on how to have his finances set up so that it will look best on the loan application. her own son is John's age, works in construction and bought his own home last summer.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-21-2003
Sat, 11-22-2003 - 2:01pm
Don't worry, you don't need the handbook, it seems that you've got the grandmother thing down pat.

Trust me, my not wanting to rush into grandmotherhood has got more to do with my children than it does with my forsaking a youthful appearance and attitude. For starters my oldest is only 14, and hopefully he'll have completed college, grad school and have a few years of progessional experience under his belt before he is mature enough to choose a wife let alone start a family. The odds for a successful marriage are stacked in his favor if he follows that route.

Just curious, how old is your son? His fiance? What do they do?

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