Your Kids: College

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Your Kids: College
18
Fri, 06-21-2013 - 10:32am

Would you like your children to go to college? Why or why not?

Do you plan to encourage your kids into a certain path in college? E.g. liberal arts, STEM, vocational? Or will your children be free to choose whichever path they would like?

What is the purpose of college, IYO? 

I belong to another discussion board where someone brings up a "degrees that don't pay off" article every few months to help fuel their perception that most college is worthless. I am curious if this opinion is specific to that group or if it is common in a general sense.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Fri, 06-21-2013 - 4:14pm

arryl wrote:
<p>My ODD plans on getting a degree "that doesn't pay off", art history, possibly with a teaching certificate along with a graduate certificate in museum administration.  I think just about everyone one is good at something, not every kid is going to be a scientist, an engineer, a lawyer or a doctor.  As long as she can make a living for herself and is happy with it, then I am happy.  Do I believe all kids need to go to college, or are cut out for college, no, there are all different paths in life.  I also think our society has gotten out of hand when a secretarial position now requires a college degree and college costs are through the roof and student loans, while not a necessity for everyone, are also out of hand.</p>

How many secretarial positions are there now, and it certainly isn't a growing job role. Traditional secretarial work has be eliminated with the expansion of technology in the workplace. 50 years ago the best and the brightest women became secretaries, nurses, or teachers. Today. almost any field is open to women in the workplace, and secretary is no longer a profession.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 06-21-2013 - 4:28pm

I think the term, secretary has been replaced by administrative assistant. And a lot of those jobs require college degrees now or so many hours of college coursework.. Long ago kids were getting those kinds of jobs right out of high school b/c high school skills were all that was necessary. I dont' think the pay for that kind of job demands a college degree.

I can't speak for arryl but that's what I take from that statement. 

 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 06-21-2013 - 4:35pm

ashmama wrote:
<p>My daughter starts college at the end of August. I have no idea, nor does she, what she wants to major in, so she's trying a bit of everything until she has to decide. I would be greatly concerned if she wanted to get an engineering degree or some other "practical" degree, because while those degrees certainly earn you more money right out of college, I don't think they provide as broad an education as a a degree in the humanities does.</p><p>My son is only a sophomore, so he has a little more time to decide, but so far, the schools he is interested in are all liberal arts colleges. If either of my kids had shown a disinclination for academic work and a strong interest in a particular trade, then we would have sent them to a vocational high school first, and then to whatever certificate program they needed to complete the study of their trade.</p><p>I know this is against the current wisdom (and I completely understand why some parents don't want to shell out hundreds of thousands of dollars for a philosophy major!), but I think we've headed in the wrong direction in recent years. College isn't, nor should it be, a trade school.</p><p> </p>

My friend's DS will be 11th grader next year, He is at an alternative public school and has been accepted to some kind of vocational pre-engineering program, It's high school coursework but I think she said that will prepare him for engineering in college.  A lot of people turn their noses up at vocational school but the reality is sometimes those schools prepare kids for if not more for college later on. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 06-21-2013 - 5:26pm

Would you like your children to go to college? Why or why not?

Yes, I would.  I think going to college and specifically go away (as in living in a dorm, even if one stays in town) is a valuable learning experience for a child and not just academics.  I think one learns a lot about themselves if they live with a roommate or alone.  I'm not sure that one can obtain a job in today's world without at least a college degree, for the majority, there are of course exceptions to that rule.

Do you plan to encourage your kids into a certain path in college? E.g. liberal arts, STEM, vocational? Or will your children be free to choose whichever path they would like?

I'm encouraging based on each individual child but ultimately the decision is up to them.  We are working on the process now with my oldest, checking out his options and so forth.

What is the purpose of college, IYO? 

See above.

PumpkinAngel

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Fri, 06-21-2013 - 6:02pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>I think the term, secretary has been replaced by administrative assistant. And a lot of those jobs require college degrees now or so many hours of college coursework.. Long ago kids were getting those kinds of jobs right out of high school b/c high school skills were all that was necessary. I dont' think the pay for that kind of job demands a college degree.</p><p>I can't speak for arryl but that's what I take from that statement. </p><p> </p>

Not really. The term secretary hasn't been replaced by admin assst.  The job has changed from a secretarial one to an administrative one.  It's a much bigger change than just a title.

At my employer, we have widely varying levels of administrative positions (and even some technically secretarial positions).   Some require a college degree; some don't.  The admin asst position and the accounting specialist positions in my office do not require a college degree and neither of the staff in those positions have one (although my acct spec is one semester away from her degree - in English.)    And while those two aren't paid big bucks (we do work for a public institution after all), they make a more than decent wage (and got raises today!)

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Fri, 06-21-2013 - 6:06pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
My friend's DS will be 11th grader next year, He is at an alternative public school and has been accepted to some kind of vocational pre-engineering program, It's high school coursework but I think she said that will prepare him for engineering in college.  A lot of people turn their noses up at vocational school but the reality is sometimes those schools prepare kids for if not more for college later on. </p>

we have a strong vocational program in our high school - one of the programs is a pre-engineering program where half of the students' classes for their junior and senior year are done at our local vo-tech instead of at the high school.  Most of those students go on to full four-year universities and major in engineering. So vo-tech education is transforming greatly as well.

I am a fan of vocational ed, because it provides skills, knowledge and education for those that aren't a candidate for a college degree.  And we'll always need carpenters and cosmeticians and mechanics, etc.  

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-05-2007
Fri, 06-21-2013 - 7:04pm

Would you like your children to go to college? Why or why not?
Yes.  I think that there are more life lessons being a college student than just the education.  Also, having an education opens up opportunities.  We often have that conversation.  I want them to be able to choose their profession, to woh, to sah, to have a spouse that has those same choices.......  Having a college education doesn't guarentee those choses, but it increases the odds that they will be available.

 

Do you plan to encourage your kids into a certain path in college? E.g. liberal arts, STEM, vocational? Or will your children be free to choose whichever path they would like?
Eh, I certainly hope that I continue to have the type of relationships with my kids that they will seek my advice.  I will certainly encourage them to take paths that each one is most likely to be successful in, but ultimately, it's their choice.

 

What is the purpose of college, IYO?
See my answer above.  :)

 

I belong to another discussion board where someone brings up a "degrees that don't pay off" article every few months to help fuel their perception that most college is worthless. I am curious if this opinion is specific to that group or if it is common in a general sense.
Again, eh.  I don't think that having an education is a waste, even if one does something completely different than what they went to school for. 

*********

Ducky

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Sat, 06-22-2013 - 10:28am

Would you like your children to go to college? Why or why not?

Yes. I think the college experience itself provides as much opportunity for learning as the time spent in the classroom. Even if they don't end up using their degree (like their mother), it does provide a safety net for them.

Do you plan to encourage your kids into a certain path in college? E.g. liberal arts, STEM, vocational? Or will your children be free to choose whichever path they would like?

Free to choose whichever path they would like. My parents pushed business over education. I ended up in education before SAH anyway. I will support whatever field they choose.

What is the purpose of college, IYO? 

Classroom instruction provides instructional knowledge on a broad variety of topics early on, which hopefully helps the kid narrow down their focus to what they really want to do. Outside of the classroom, the kids learn to juggle extra-curriculars, working, and hone their interpersonal skills.

I belong to another discussion board where someone brings up a "degrees that don't pay off" article every few months to help fuel their perception that most college is worthless. I am curious if this opinion is specific to that group or if it is common in a general sense.

Specific to that group. I'm a huge proponent of the collegiate experience.

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