12 year vaccines?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-10-2009
12 year vaccines?
17
Thu, 06-11-2009 - 1:53pm

Hi,


I posted this on another brd too, but it doesn't appear to be very active.


It's time for me to head to the Dr to get my 12 yr old dd's vaccinations.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
In reply to: pamms2
Thu, 06-11-2009 - 2:36pm

Try going here for product insert information:


http://www.vaccinesafety.edu/package_inserts.htm


Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
In reply to: pamms2
Fri, 06-12-2009 - 12:29am

Neither vaccine is "live" b/c they are all against bacterial infections, and use only a part of the toxoid to create the vaccine. (:

As far as her past medical history .. I don't see how any of that would be directly related to or increase her risk of adverse reactions from a vaccine .. but you can't ever say for certain if a person will or will not have a reaction. You have to do what you feel best doing.




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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: pamms2
Fri, 06-12-2009 - 4:39pm

The package inserts list the side effects. (PP gave you a link). I am not sure which one you're talking about when you refer to having a choice of oral or injection. Much has changed in twelve years. That was possibly the Rotovirus Vaccine, it was added to the schedule around '99. It was pulled because it caused more death than the CDC could justify with their fancy wording.

There is also the polio vaccine that used to come as an oral dose or an injection but they gave both (back when oral polio was used) - I don't think that was ever a choice of one or the other. They pulled the oral polio vaccine (after many many years of use) because it was found that the vaccine actually caused milder forms of polio. I believe it was around 2001 or 2002 when they took it off the vaccine schedule in all 50 states (they probably still use it in developing countries). The vaccine causing the disease is nothing new, the polio vaccines before that one did the same. Check the package insert for the newest version, it may list milder forms of polio as side effects too.

There are other oral vaccines I'm sure but I'm not real well versed in how they are administered.

Call your daughter's doctor and ask specifically which vaccines she is scheduled for. Some are made by more than one manufacturer so you'll want to read the package insert for the specific vaccine.

Let us know, we're always happy to give you our side's opinions around here. We'll offer you many facts that you won't find by yourself unless you are really good at research. Many of the ladies here are :).

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: pamms2
Fri, 06-12-2009 - 8:07pm

Something to give consideration to when reading about vaccines:

Often, a package insert will use the word "rare" to describe side effects. The truth of the matter is that nobody knows how often these reactions - serious or not - occur. The trials and studies are extremely short-term...laughably so.

When your doctor or some internet doctor tells you something such as "The likelihood of a serious adverse reaction is extremely low" - just know that they can't back up that "extremely low" with any significance AT ALL. Also consider the wording. Notice that they don't say "The likelihood of an adverse reaction is extremely low". No, they put the word "serious" in there to cover their butt. But just know - serious or not serious - nobody knows the real numbers behind the likelihood of a vaccine reaction. Nobody keeps up with these numbers. Only 1-2% gets reported to VAERS.

If you would like to know more about HPV vaccine (Guardasil), do a search on this website, there are many posts about how RARE the side effects are NOT. It's a dangerous vaccine and leaves the parent with some false sense of security that their child is forever protected from all the strains that cause cancer. You would be seriously mistaken to believe that. It is a very very dangerous vaccine. I'll teach my daughter to keep her legs closed instead of getting that vaccine that could possibly kill her.

Sorry - I just came from the "other" board and read about holding children (PRE-TEENS) down - like animals - to administer their ever-so-necessary shots...how sick!

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-03-2005
In reply to: pamms2
Mon, 06-22-2009 - 10:20pm

Yes, I found the info about holding a child down to give the vaccine disturbing as well.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: pamms2
Tue, 06-23-2009 - 12:10am

"I hate the idea of doing either, but can't even imagine living with the possible consequences of not having her get them."

In a world where vaccines worked every time, that sort of thinking would be valid. I used to think that way myself, but now I cringe when I hear comments that make me think the person believes that vaccines never fail. :)

Yes, it's hard to be a Mom. My son threw-up for a day, was fine the next day and then had another day of throwing up. As a Mom, we try to think of what it could be...a virus...something he ate? But in all honesty, the thoughts that it could be a vaccine preventable disease never enters my mind. Mainly because most of those diseases are unheard of in this country. The way we live has changed our environment drastically so the spread of disease is less likely. Instead of weakening my child's immune system, I prefer to learn ways of strengthening it. Maybe one day he'll be as healthy as his never-vaccinated sister.

Something that will make being a Mom a little easier (or it did for me) was to learn about each disease and how it's spread. I have a mental picture of measles rash in my mind and I look at pictures of measles rash often...it's the only one I ever even think about. But really, it depends on the age and the activities the child participates in. Learn how each disease is spread what each one would look like and that may make you feel a bit better. It would also help to learn that they are not fatal diseases, even the CDC says so. :) Understanding scare tactics will make a huge difference in the way you see the vaccines and the diseases both.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-03-2005
In reply to: pamms2
Tue, 06-23-2009 - 11:24am

Hi,


I understand that the vaccines are not 100% protection, but still...if she were to get something that could have been prevented...even if it is just

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
In reply to: pamms2
Tue, 06-23-2009 - 12:58pm
Hi There. Got 2 kids, ages 2 and 3. Both only had 1st hep b vacc.

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: pamms2
Tue, 06-23-2009 - 3:26pm

"Our state requires Td and the Dr recommends Tdap to cover that."

I don't have time to look for myself, can you tell me what Td is? I don't remember what state you are from, but the word "required" may be misleading.

My pediatrician recommended all vaccines, it was all or nothing with the entire practice :( . Even for vaccines for disease spread only by sexual contact - they recommended my newborn have it. Even the ones that are for diseases which can only be gotten if a wound is not properly cleaned. Some doctors pick and choose, it's interesting to learn the reasons.

I would be interested to know which other vaccines he recommends more than what's on the schedule. I love an open minded doctor!

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: pamms2
Tue, 06-23-2009 - 3:54pm

Did you find the package insert for adacel and Manatra?

I'll see what I can find on those two.

Yes, I started out vaccinating. I researched and decided to only give my child certain ones and I waited until he was past two yrs old. I later realized that the doctors get their information from the pharma-mafia so I got the truth instead. My youngest has never had a vaccine. She had the Chickenpox, but unless you ask to see her belly, you wouldn't have known it. She played like nothing was wrong for the entire week.

Her brother was vaccinated for Chickenpox and still got Chickenpox a few months later. I'm so glad they both had the disease! Now I don't have to worry about Chickenpox killing them as adults when their vaccine wears off. (They have life-long immunity, which the vaccine does not provide.) In addition, my daughter's babies will be immune from chickenpox during infancy. Again - you won't get that from the vaccine!

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