? about cpox vax (m)

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
? about cpox vax (m)
6
Tue, 06-24-2003 - 9:05pm
I would like info on both sides of the cpox vax. I am up in the air about it because I have heard so many conflicitng things. My 9 1/2 month old is fully vaxed, except for the hepB which I decided to wait until he was a year old for on the suggestion of a nurse/friend. I am definately (mostly) pro-vax for us, but I am unsure about the cpox and would appreciate some input. School requirements are not an issue as I will be homeschooing for at least the first several years.

Thanks,

Kimberly


Edited 6/24/2003 9:06:44 PM ET by klpmommy

Avatar for kidoctr
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Wed, 06-25-2003 - 7:54pm
Hi Kimberly, for my (provax) opinion about Varivax:

http://pages.ivillage.com/vaccinesupport/FAQ.html (question #6)

HTH - Eve

CL of the PP Vaccine Support board

http://messageboards.ivillage.com/iv-ppvaccines

Co-CL of the PS Child Health Board

http://messageboards.ivillage.com/iv-psped

Our family website: www.geocities.com/kidoctr

 
 
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 06-25-2003 - 10:43pm
Not all peds think alike of course, so here's the thoughts of a couple more of them



http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/310/6971/2

<>

<< If the protective effect of immunisation wanes a programme of universal immunisation may create a population of adults who are at risk of serious illness and thus turn a relatively benign childhood illness into a major cause of illness and teratogenicity>>

<< Thus the benefits to most children from chickenpox immunisation would be minimal: the benefits accrue only to immunocompromised children>>

<>

<< Studies have shown that universal chickenpox immunisation is not cost effective in terms of health costs alone.7 8 These studies may even underestimate the costs, because they do not account for the possible increase in costs if universal immunisation delays disease until adulthood>>

<>

Assistant professor of paediatrics MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA

Associate professor of paediatrics Department of Paediatrics, La Rabida Children's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60649, USA

The MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics is supported by grants from the Dorothy J MacLean family, the Henry J Kaiser Family Foundation, the Andrew W Mellon Foundation, and the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Lainie Friedman Ross, John D Lantos



Jan

Avatar for suschi
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 06-28-2003 - 7:59am
"Given the mild course of chickenpox in healthy children, such a policy is not justified."

Great article, will add that to my files.

From the drug makers standpoint, "Given the millions of dollars that will be generated by the mandatory use of this vaccine, such a policy is justified."

And that's the bottom line.

Christine

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-08-2003
Wed, 07-09-2003 - 4:06pm
I just wanted to say that im pro vac. My daughter who is 5 had her pox shot when she was 1 or 1 1/2 i dont remeber that well lol. Anyways last year right after he little brother was born she got the chicken pox from preschool. She basically only had spots on her face she barely even itched at all and didnt have fever. Im glad she got the shot cause she could had it a lot worse it could have been all over her body and she could have gotten a fever and gotten sick.

Cindy
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-14-2003
Thu, 07-17-2003 - 12:48pm
Jan's post said it all I think. Unfortunately varivax is now mandatory in my state. I have decided to skip it anyway, so one more thing to worry about fighting when my baby reaches school age. Anyhow, I wanted to add that if you are against abortion like I am...the last I heard/knew varivax is made using tissue from aborted fetuses. Pretty disgusting IMO. Also another good reason to skip it. Good luck in your descision.

Avatar for keeley_14383
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 07-17-2003 - 3:58pm
I was torn about Varivax, too. I am also pro-life, and I also live in a state that mandates it for school. My two older boys just got the shot yesterday, actually. I'm still not sure it was the right thing to do, but it is done. Here's the scoop about the "abortion" link -- Varivax (as well as MMR) is indeed cultured on cell lines that were originally taken from an aborted fetus (in the 1960's). This is a continuous line of cells that has been growing ever since (in other words they don't need more cells from current abortions). So these cells are ancestors of the original fetal cells. I would whole-heartedly be against using a vaccine grown on cells from fetuses aborted now, or even if they occasionally had to replenish or something -- but after a lot of thought and prayer over MMR and reading what my church says about it, I decided I could use these vaccines and not be hypocritical with my pro-life position. If you decide something different, but want the *other* vaccines, it is possible you could claim a religious exemption for school just for MMR and Varivax. (However, this would not work if you still want MMR.)

Best of luck to you --

Keeley