Antibody Titers

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Antibody Titers
7
Thu, 04-17-2008 - 4:30pm

We've touched on this subject in the past, I thought I'd pass on a friend's comments on the subject:


{"Protective titer levels" doesn't mean anything. Titers rise after exposure to a new threat whether it be natural or vaccine. Then they fall. If there is a detectable titer, it means the animal (including human animals) has been exposed to that organism in the past. If a titer is high or rising, the exposure was recent or ongoing. If there is no detectable titer, either the animal has not been exposed, the antibody level is too low to detect, or the immune system is too damaged to respond. Why would an animal continue to waste resources on antibodies that aren't needed? That's what memory cells are for--so that if that organism comes along again the immune system can quickly marshall the necessary resources to combat it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-05-2003
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 10:02am

This is interesting in light of a debate I heard on the radio yesterday re the Mumps vaccine failure study in Iowa.

They were discussing primary and secondary vaccine failure and the lack of research done on distinguishing between those types of failures and why they happen.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-05-2003
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 10:04am

Oh it's online if you want to listen to it!

http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/2008/200804/20080417.html

Scroll midway down to part two.

The Current: Part 2

Vaccines - Mumps Victim

Mumps is one of those diseases that was supposed to be on its way to disappearing, thanks to an effective vaccine and better public health management. But in 2006 and 2007 there were mumps outbreaks in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom.

C.J. O'Brien knows firsthand how nasty mumps can be. He contracted the disease in 2006 while he was a student at the University of Iowa. He's spoke to us from Des Moines.

Future of Vaccines - Study

Researchers at the US Centers for Disease Control have been looking into that outbreak in Iowa, with their findings getting published in April 2008 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Gustavo Dayan is co-author of the report and he joined us from Swiftwater, Pennsylvania.

Future of Vaccines - Public Health

Here in Canada, more than 200 cases of mumps reported during an outbreak in Nova Scotia in the spring of 2007 that was traced to students at Dalhousie University. Cases were later reported in New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Ontario and Alberta. To find out where Canada stands on the mumps vaccine, we were joined by Doctor Arlene King, the Director General of the Centre for Immunization and Respiratory Infections Division at the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Future of Vaccines - Author

This isn't the first time we've had to confront the possibility that a vaccine is no longer as effective as it once was. For some historical perspective on vaccines, we were joined from Washington by Arthur Allen, author of Vaccine: The Controversial Story of Medicine's Greatest Lifesaver.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 12:18pm

I particularly liked her description of the body wasting resources to circulate antibodies for threats that may not be necessary.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Fri, 04-18-2008 - 11:58pm

Thanks for this post! Your friend's comments were so easy to read and understand!

Had you posted this previously?

http://www-immuno.path.cam.ac.uk/~immuno/part1/lec15/lec15_97.html

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Sat, 04-19-2008 - 1:52pm

I don't think so?

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Sat, 04-19-2008 - 4:12pm
I had read it before, that is why I asked. 'Bout to read it again. :)
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Sat, 04-19-2008 - 11:07pm

I don't know if I posted it here or not... she does have a way with words, no?