Bad injections

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-13-2008
Bad injections
11
Sat, 07-25-2009 - 9:26pm

I choose to be selective when vaccinating my kids (ages 3 and 7 weeks). But one thing that has really been bothering me is how they inject the vaccines into my kids.


After the doctor leaves and the medical technician comes in (NOTE: Med tech, not nurse. Med techs have a few months of training, nurses have degrees), when the tech comes in the give the shots they always

Kate
Wife to Andrew
Mom to Aidan (4) and Kieran (1)


 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Tue, 07-28-2009 - 9:57pm
ITA!! :) I'm not saying the doctors are bad .. just that their plates are full .. and it takes a nurse who also has experience and know s what he/she is doing to be able to work as a part of that team.



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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-14-2005
Tue, 07-28-2009 - 3:30pm
Welcome to the board Heather!





iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Tue, 07-28-2009 - 3:23pm
I think like with any other profession there are those that follow protocol and do their jobs as effectively as possible and there are those that do not.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Tue, 07-28-2009 - 1:41pm

"But we both know the truth, it's all in what you can stand on your conscience."

I think I know what you mean there, and if I do, I want to tell you that from my experiences, you'll get that with *any* job. Brace yourself because Motherhood REALLY brings it on :) .

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Tue, 07-28-2009 - 1:12pm

"I can't tell you the number of times in the last month alone, that if it were not for a nurse, patients may have died or been seriously injured by new doctors."

I have heard of nurses correcting doctors before, that's pretty common. And not always new doctors either. Like I said, I think it comes from experience and doctors have to acquire the experience just like all other professions. My client's wife works for a plastic surgeon and my best friend is an Assistant to an Ophthalmologist. they both tell stories of how the doctor, along with the nurses, are trained to use new equipment. The nurses often remind the doctor of something they were told during class that the doctor had forgotten and sometimes, it was something of extreme importance. But all of us have to get experience...and in my eyes it matters more than anything else. Nurses are there to support the doctor, and it's a shame that some doctors are so full of themselves and talk down to them like they do. IF truth be told, they couldn't do the job without them. But again, it's not the book learning that makes a person great at what they do, it's experience. Just my opinion though :) .

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Tue, 07-28-2009 - 12:59pm

I'm glad you're joining us. Welcome to the board!

I have many friends who work in health care and I feel that what makes someone good at their job is more about dedication and experience than whatever degree they may hold. I was doing the same work before (not in the medical field) I started school as I am doing now so, the degree only meant better pay for me. I was trained by my Aunt to do the work so I got real experience before the book learning and let me tell ya - the book learning was so far from reality it wasn't funny. That is why I believe that experience means so much more than schooling. Dedication is what matters most, in any job. Some people take it upon them selves to further their learning by self-education and to me, someone who takes the initiative to do that will certainly understand their job much better than a person who stopped learning once their degree or certification was in-hand. I don't know anything anything nursing degrees but I know it took my Mom less than 4 years and she had an LPN license, an RN license and another one that I don't know the name of - it allowed her to work for an Ambulance Service (EMT?). She only put in a few years of work and then went back to her old job because it paid more. When I look at the importance of a nurse and the importance of her old job, I find it sad that her nursing job paid so much less. And yes, she was giving shots and taking blood.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-19-2009
Tue, 07-28-2009 - 11:40am
we could go on about this forever, like you said about being

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Tue, 07-28-2009 - 9:35am

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I no longer practice as a nurse (just waiting for my license to run out) because of those things and much worse that I have seen.

How about this - How many "medical professionals" (of any kind) do you see who actually wash their hands for 15-30 seconds before caring for you???>>

I'm going to disagree with you a bit (OK, a lot) on your information .. Most nurses (at least in the northeast) DO have degrees .. either associate degrees (2 years) or baccalaureate degrees (4 years). You have to not only satisfactorily complete your nursing education (which usually means GPA higher than 3.0) AND pass the licensure exam. Diploma nurses have been nurses for so long that I would trust their experience over that of an ADN almost any day ... their education did not end with their diploma .. you still have to complete annual competencies and continuing education credits.

There are accelerated BSN programs -- which take 16-18 months to complete, but they require a prior baccalaureate degree which fulfills all pre-req requirements for a nursing program -- and then 16-18 months which includes all nursing courses and usually around 500 hours of clinical experience.

NOT the same as a med-tech. Med techs are qualified to check blood pressures, weights and measure your height.

With regard to hand washing .. the Joint Commission, which accredits health care institutions has a list of their National Patient Safety Goals .. one of those goals is reduced transmission of infection / nosocomial infections. To meet these goals, hospitals actually have to keep track of their "hand hygiene" -- sounds silly, but they audit doctors and nurses and "spy" on us to make sure we're washing our hands adequately. We have big campaigns in the hospital to "foam in and foam out" -- you lose points if you don't do both .. the percent compliance is posted weekly -- and the goal is 100% compliance throughout the facility. There are signs in all of the patient rooms to remind patients, to remind their providers to wash their hands -- it's a big deal and it is getting a lot of attention.

The recommendation with regard to aspiration is as follows:

"ACIP does not recommend aspiration when administering vaccines because no data exist to justify the need for this practice. IM injections are not given in areas where large vessels are present. Given the size of the needle and the angle at which you inject the vaccine, it is difficult to cannulate a vessel without rupturing it and even more difficult to actually deliver the vaccine intravenously. We are aware of no reports of a vaccine being administered intravenously and causing harm in the absence of aspiration."

Not sure where you worked -- or what went so wrong that you would choose to stop practicing, but I'm sorry that you've been so turned off by the profession. I hope that you will be able to come to terms with that decision and not continue to speak negatively about nurses. I can't tell you the number of times in the last month alone, that if it were not for a nurse, patients may have died or been seriously injured by new doctors. It doesn't make me want to leave my job -- it reinforces the need for nurses to be well-educated and attentive to their patients -- and to advocate for your patients. We can read a chart, look up labs and we certainly spend more time with our patients than the doctors do. We often know more than the family and are really in a position to push for the things our patients do or do not need. I certainly wouldn't be downplaying the importance nurses have in the health care setting or implying that they are uneducated and uncaring, but that's JMO! :)




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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-19-2009
Mon, 07-27-2009 - 6:39pm

I am a nurse and I hate to break it to you but you have 2 things wrong. first, most nurses don't have degrees, we have licensure - that means 1-2 years of school (the same as a med-tech).


second, they no longer recommend aspiration of the needle in infants, I don't know why - it's stupid.


I no longer practice as

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Sun, 07-26-2009 - 9:26pm

The OBGYN that I used when Vannah was born confided in me that none of her children have gotten the Hep B shot and never would get it either. When you hear that from your doctor, you start to really open your eyes...or I did. I had already refused it for Brayden but mostly because it was very new. I had no idea, at the time, what the risk factors of a baby actually getting the disease were.

Now it sends me off in a tizzy every time I think about it!

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