Can anyone explain this to me?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-2008
Can anyone explain this to me?
10
Fri, 09-25-2009 - 11:12am
The CDC says that there are only about 10,000 cases or pertussis (whooping cough) per year... if that is the case, then the chances of catching whooping cough are low even for the unvaccinated, but then I find information like this http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-05-26-whooping-cough_N.htm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Fri, 09-25-2009 - 1:13pm

Kat,


I was getting ready to reply when I noted it would be a very lengthy reply! Do yourself a favor; 1) don't panic; 2) go to your nearest bookstore and get "Vaccine Safety Manual" Neil Z. Miller, April 2008. In here, you will get the history of disease, the vaccines, the studies done.

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-21-2006
Fri, 09-25-2009 - 7:54pm

I was born in Poland in the 80s and they did not vaccinate for pertussis at the time. It was one of those things that kids just got much like croup, or a cold nowadays. I had it, my parents had it, everyone I grew up with had it (the same is true for measles and mumps actually!). I have never heard of it as being something serious until I started researching vaccines and reading about how "deadly" it is. I don't know what the actually numbers are or your chances of catching it or anything but its really much milder than it seems.


iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Mon, 09-28-2009 - 12:12am

In healthy people over the age of two and younger than 50, it's not actually "deadly". It sounds good, when trying to sell the product.

If a newborn infant catches whooping cough, it could be really bad. I kept my babies at home during cold and flu season. I may have taken them out a little bit, but I did avoid crowds and ran the opposite direction each and every time someone coughed :)

Neither of mine got the Pertussis vaccine. That is the one that they they blamed my brother's Autism (a/k/a Mental Retardation) on. Back then (early 70's), it was the whole cell pertussis vaccine, today it's A-Cellular. But since the majority of SIDS cases were vaccinated with the DTaP within 3 weeks of death - I have yet to believe it made that big a difference.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Mon, 09-28-2009 - 12:38am

Scare Tactics

It's a lot to do with money and politics. The FDA and CDC are as corrupt as most of our politicians in the whitehouse. Scientists who sit on committees which decide if vaccines go on the schedule or not - they are allowed to hold financial interests in pharmaceuticals while simultaneously making vaccine decisions for the entire country (and some other countries as well).

The best way to describe it would be to link an article about global warming:

http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=ZTBiMTRlMDQxNzEyMmRhZjU3ZmYzODI5MGY4ZWI5OWM=&w=MQ==

Learning about the corruption in this country is disgusting and sad.

To learn about vaccines, read here because we offer tons of good articles and not all of them are opinion pieces. As Randi has suggested, get Miller's book if you are serious about learning.

What you'll want to consider (and I doubt any medical professional will tell you) is that the vaccine has a very questionable efficacy rate:

http://www.ajc.com/health/content/metro/stories/2009/03/22/whooping_cough_vaccine.html

This happened in my state. The week it happened, we were in a museum filled with Cobb County school children. Neither of my children got Pertussis, none of the kids who were with us did either. None were vaccinated for Pertussis. We may have been exposed to the disease, may not have been exposed. Not everyone will get a disease when exposed...we're all different.

Here is some additional reading:

http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress/vaccine-efficacy-how-often-do-vaccines-work/dtap/

I had something better in mind, but for some strange reason, its not there...

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/Organizations/DDIL/pertuss.html

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-2008
Mon, 09-28-2009 - 12:00pm
Thanks for all your advice.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Mon, 09-28-2009 - 12:47pm

From what I can gather from Dr. Sears, he seems to support vaccinations, but, with a common sense approach, and isn't one that shuns parents because they think otherwise, one way or the other. I like him, he seems well versed and appears to also put the patient ahead of politics, which I really admire.


Do also really encourage you to get the VSM. The author is only a researcher, but what he's gathered is history and studies, and I think that that is very beneficial given that everything is able to be backed up. (minus there are some parts in the book which are emotion/opinion driven).


Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Mon, 09-28-2009 - 3:50pm

I'm glad to hear you're arming yourself with information. One thing I want to tell you is to look for references as you are reading along. When something jumps out at you, look for proof that its more than just opinion. I think that was the one thing that separates Miller's book from the rest. Every fact is backed up with some sort of reference.

And if we haven't welcomed you already - welcome to the board!

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Mon, 09-28-2009 - 3:57pm

"all written by doctors (and I checked their credentials)"

I had to smile when I read that because I was thinking "Doctors are the ones telling us to vaccinate". ;)

You would be shocked to learn just how much vaccine research and study goes on in med school. Pediatricians spend almost no time at all studying the human brain. Neurological disorders are a specialty so basically, they just need to learn when to write a referral.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Tue, 09-29-2009 - 11:02pm
I was at a conference a while ago (couple of years)

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Wed, 09-30-2009 - 7:52am
That makes sense to me, and I totally respect his position on the matter.
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Rands