Could someone help me out?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Could someone help me out?
2
Thu, 08-28-2003 - 7:21am
My dd just had her 2yr well baby appt. and they told me that her shots were optional. (i vaccinate both of my children) Then they started to tell me about the 2 shots that i could decide if i want her to have them or not. I havent decided yet on 1 of them. The first one is for Hep.A. the dr said that this is the one that can be spread from infected person to non infected person by eating,drinking after them, touching hands if the infected person should happen to sneeze and doesnt wash his hands then touches my child. My question for that one is the vaccine for Hep A, a live virus? or what? ( i tried to ask the dr. but he is so not smart. i am on an army base in Europe)

The second vaccine, I went ahead and let my dd have it, was for a type on meningitis. (They didnt tell me what one and have yet to call me back) The nurse said that my dd is at a higher risk for catching it since we live in Italy and they dont vaccinate for it here (that i am aware of. i am assuming this, she didnt come right out and tell me) but yet the disease is still out there and very catchable. If that made any sense. My question on that is do you know what type of meningitis it could be? I have NO idea on where to look for it.

Any help? TIA

Lyndsay

Avatar for suschi
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 08-28-2003 - 8:27am
First off, you are getting inaccurate info, Hep A is not spread by sneezing. You need to request the vaccine inserts of the two you mentioned and read them through. That may be all you need to answer the questions you have.

Personally, Hep A is not necessary, if your child had it, you would probably never know because it is so MILD, and self limiting. The other vaccine is probably Prevnar, and the series is usually completed by the time the infant is 15 months of age. The insert will explain the high risk groups recommended that covers the older child. I recommend NOT allowing the shots until you have the inserts in hand and have read them. I am not talking about the vague limited vaccine information sheet normally given with the shots, I mean the insert that includes prescribing information.

HTH,

Christine

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 08-28-2003 - 9:56am
Lindasy,

Here is what I found out from a brief search through a medical manual, CDC fact sheets, and WebMD. Ask you doctor to provide you with the vaccine inserts if you need more clinical information.

Regarding long term risks:

The infection is not treated with medication. Hepatitis A goes away on its own in most cases. Home treatment, such as eating balanced meals and drinking plenty of water, usually helps the body recover.

Regarding you live virus question:

There is no live virus in hepatitis A vaccines. The virus is inactivated during production of the vaccines, similar to Salk-type inactivated polio vaccine.

Is Hepatitis A Vaccine Safe?

Yes, hepatitis A vaccine has an excellent safety profile. No serious adverse events have been attributed definitively to hepatitis A vaccine. Soreness at the injection site is the most frequently reported side effect.

Any adverse event suspected to be associated with hepatitis A vaccination should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS forms can be obtained by calling 1-800-822-7967.


Can Other Vaccines Be Given at the Same Time That Hepatitis A Vaccine Is Given?

Yes. Hepatitis B, diphtheria, poliovirus (oral and inactivated), tetanus, oral typhoid, cholera, Japanese encephalitis, rabies, yellow fever vaccine or immune globulin can be given at the same time that hepatitis A vaccine is given, but at a different injection site.

How Long Does Immunity Last after Hepatitis A Vaccination?

Although data on long-term protection are limited, estimates based on modeling techniques suggest that protection will last for at least 20 years.

When Are Persons Protected after Receiving Hepatitis A Vaccine?

Protection against hepatitis A begins four weeks after the first dose of hepatitis A vaccine. Check with your doctor for when the next dose is due.

Should Prevaccination Testing Be Done?

Prevaccination testing is done only in specific instances to control cost (e.g., persons who were likely to have had hepatitis A in the past). This includes persons who were born in countries with high levels of hepatitis A virus infection, elderly persons, and persons who have clotting factor disorders and may have received factor concentrates in the past.



Persons Who Should Receive Hepatitis A Vaccine

Hepatitis A vaccination provides protection before one is exposed to hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for the following groups who are at increased risk for infection and for any person wishing to obtain immunity.

Persons Traveling to or Working in Countries That Have High or Intermediate Rates of Hepatitis A.

All susceptible persons traveling to or working in countries that have high or intermediate rates of hepatitis A should be vaccinated or receive immune globulin before traveling. Persons from developed countries who travel to developing countries are at high risk for hepatitis A. Such persons include tourists, military personnel, missionaries, and others who work or study abroad in countries that have high or intermediate levels of of hepatitis A. The risk for hepatitis A exists even for travelers to urban areas, those who stay in luxury hotels, and those who report that they have good hygiene and that they are careful about what they drink and eat.


Persons Who Have Occupational Risk for Infection

Persons who work with hepatitis A virus-infected primates or with hepatitis A virus in a research laboratory setting should be vaccinated. No other groups have been shown to be at increased risk for hepatitis A virus infection because of occupational exposure.

Outbreaks of hepatitis A have been reported among persons working with non-human primates that are susceptible to hepatitis A virus infection, including several Old World and New World species. Primates that were infected were those that had been born in the wild, not those that had been born and raised in captivity.

Persons Who Have Chronic Liver Disease

Persons with chronic liver disease who have never had hepatitis A should be vaccinated, as there is a higher rate of fulminant (rapid onset of liver failure, often leading to death) hepatitis A among persons with chronic liver disease. Persons who are either awaiting or have received liver transplants also should be vaccinated.

Persons Who Have Clotting-Factor Disorders

Persons who have never had hepatitis A and who are administered clotting-factor concentrates, especially solvent detergent-treated preparations, should be given hepatitis A vaccine.

All persons with hemophilia (Factor VIII, Factor IX) who receive replacement therapy should be vaccinated because there appears to be an increased risk of transmission from clotting-factor concentrates that are not heat inactivated.

Day-Care Attendees

The frequency of outbreaks of hepatitis A is not high enough in this setting to warrant routine hepatitis A vaccination. In some communities, however, day-care centers play a role in sustaining community-wide outbreaks. In this situation, consideration should be given to adding hepatitis A vaccine to the prevention plan for children and staff in the involved center(s).

Travel and the Prevention of Hepatitis A

Who Should Receive Protection Against Hepatitis A Before Travel?

All susceptible persons traveling to or working in countries that have high or intermediate rates of hepatitis A should be vaccinated or receive immune globulin before traveling. Persons from developed countries who travel to developing countries are at high risk for hepatitis A. Such persons include tourists, military personnel, missionaries, and others who work or study abroad in countries that have high or intermediate levels of of hepatitis A. The risk for hepatitis A exists even for travelers to urban areas, those who stay in luxury hotels, and those who report that they have good hygiene and that they are careful about what they drink and eat.


I hope this helps. Please do ask for more detailed advice. Even a military doctor is required to provide you with precise information provided to him by drug manufacturers.

-Amy

PS: The menegitis vaccine is probably Prevnar. That is typically given in the US to young infants and it has shown a dramatic decrease in the rate of menegitis in newborns and infants. Streptococcus bacteria is what this vaccine is meant to fight against. It was the leading cause of menegitis and pnuemonia after the introduction of the Hib B vaccine. More about that vaccine:


"There is also another vaccine that these children must take to prevent meningitis caused by another bacterium called Hemophilus influenza B, or Hib. It was once also the leading cause of bacterial meningitis but lost that distinction after the FDA approved an infant Hib vaccine in 1990." (WebMD and CDC vaccination fact sheets)